Windows 11 launching on October 5 in phased rollout

Posted:
in General Discussion edited August 2021
PCs with Windows 11 pre-installed and free upgrades to the new operating system will become available to users starting October 5 -- minus the ability to run Android apps.

Windows 11 coming October 5
Windows 11 coming October 5


Windows 11 offers a new redesign, updated Start menu, and better integration with Microsoft 365. Microsoft will be rolling out the update in a phased approach with a "focus on quality."

According to a Windows blog post, new eligible devices will be offered the upgrade first. Then, it will roll out over time to in-market devices based on intelligence models.

These intelligence models consider the hardware eligibility, reliability metrics, age of device, and other factors. Microsoft expects all eligible devices will be upgraded to Windows 11 by mid-2022.

Also, a report from Windows Central says one major feature of Windows 11 will be delayed until 2022 -- Android app support. While Microsoft is working with Amazon and Intel on support, it says that the feature has to be pushed back to a later update.

Microsoft also lists multiple PCs that will run Windows 11 pre-installed with a new purchase.
  • Acer Swift 5
  • Acer Swift X
  • Asus Zenbook Flip 13
  • Asus Zenbook 14
  • Alienware x15
  • Dell XPS 13
  • HP Spectre x360
  • Samsung Galaxy Book Pro
  • Surface Pro 7
  • Surface Laptop 4
Those who want the Windows 11 experience right away may want to opt for a new PC. Otherwise, users will be waiting for the rollout algorithm to enable the update for their PC.

Mac users will have a more difficult time, however. Microsoft requires TPM 2.0 in order to run Windows 11, so Mac users will have to enable workarounds or use virtualization software to access the new operating system on incompatible hardware.

Check to see if Windows 11 is ready for your device by going to Settings, then "Windows Update." Next, select "Check for updates" to see if the upgrade is available starting October 5.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 16
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    "new eligible devices will be offered the upgrade first. Then, it will roll out over time to in-market devices based on intelligence models."

    So, if I read this correctly, system requirements will be changing and becoming more lax over many months...

    This sounds like it'll be incredibly confusing to users:  "Will my machine run Windows 11?   Yesterday it couldn't.  Maybe tomorrow!"
    Plus, Microsoft states a requirement of TPM 2.0 -- but previous articles say that installing from an ISO negates that as a requirement.

    Is Microsoft TRYING to make this confusing?
    Could they (for some reason?) be pushing people to just buy a new machine?  
    .... Why would they do that?   While they do sell hardware, they are not a major vendor.
    ikir
  • Reply 2 of 16
    ikirikir Posts: 127member
    As always: big mess.
    rotateleftbyteopinion
  • Reply 3 of 16

    Plus, Microsoft states a requirement of TPM 2.0 -- but previous articles say that installing from an ISO negates that as a requirement.
    As I recall, the install from ISO thing only worked if you copied a specific file (I forget which one) from the Win 10 ISO to the Win 11 one.  An unmodified Win 11 ISO would still have the TPM 2.0 requirement.
  • Reply 4 of 16
     I have a powerful desktop that does not have TPM 2.0 on board or through firmware.  I not going to upgrade for the sake of upgrading just for Windows 11 Pro.  Why discards a still very fast PC just because Microsoft and PC manufacturers insist you do so? Some hacker will eventually defeat the TPM 2.0 chip anyways!  History is on my side.
    edited August 2021
  • Reply 5 of 16
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member

    Plus, Microsoft states a requirement of TPM 2.0 -- but previous articles say that installing from an ISO negates that as a requirement.
    As I recall, the install from ISO thing only worked if you copied a specific file (I forget which one) from the Win 10 ISO to the Win 11 one.  An unmodified Win 11 ISO would still have the TPM 2.0 requirement.

    Perhaps, but earlier Apple Insider reported:
    ""Users with older PCs that don't meet the company's recommendations can download an ISO of the operating system and install it manually, according to the report."
  • Reply 6 of 16
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 6,018member
     I have a powerful desktop that does not have TPM 2.0 on board or through firmware.  I not going to upgrade for the sake of upgrading just for Windows 11 Pro.  Why discards a still very fast PC just because Microsoft and PC manufacturers insist you do so? Some hacker will eventually defeat the TPM 2.0 chip anyways!  History is on my side.
    It's kind of moot.  It's not like Windows10 is going to suddenly stop working.  Windows10 is expected to be EOL in October of 2025.  That's still another four years away and by then, you will probably have retired your PC anyways with far faster, newer tech or just be content with how its running.

    I myself run Windows in a VM so it's a non-issue.
    edited August 2021
  • Reply 7 of 16
    dewmedewme Posts: 4,640member

    Plus, Microsoft states a requirement of TPM 2.0 -- but previous articles say that installing from an ISO negates that as a requirement.
    As I recall, the install from ISO thing only worked if you copied a specific file (I forget which one) from the Win 10 ISO to the Win 11 one.  An unmodified Win 11 ISO would still have the TPM 2.0 requirement.

    Perhaps, but earlier Apple Insider reported:
    ""Users with older PCs that don't meet the company's recommendations can download an ISO of the operating system and install it manually, according to the report."
    Latest rumor has it that Windows Update won’t work on “unsupported” Windows 11 systems. Whatever. Windows 11 is like adding an extra pickle to a Windows 10 hamburger that already has pickles on it. 

    Unless Microsoft adds something to compel me to upgrade to Windows 11 I’ll keep on using Windows 10. I run Windows because I have to, not because I want to. I’ve been using Windows since version 2.x and there’s really nothing about it that gets me excited. 

    Windows 10 is the most reliable and stable version of Windows ever. It doesn’t suck or make me want to throw my PC into a wood chipper. As long as Microsoft can maintain Windows where it is with version 10 in terms of stability and keep it out of the chipper, I’m totally happy with it and aspire to nothing more. 
    FileMakerFellermuthuk_vanalingambruce young
  • Reply 8 of 16
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 6,018member
    dewme said:

    Plus, Microsoft states a requirement of TPM 2.0 -- but previous articles say that installing from an ISO negates that as a requirement.
    As I recall, the install from ISO thing only worked if you copied a specific file (I forget which one) from the Win 10 ISO to the Win 11 one.  An unmodified Win 11 ISO would still have the TPM 2.0 requirement.

    Perhaps, but earlier Apple Insider reported:
    ""Users with older PCs that don't meet the company's recommendations can download an ISO of the operating system and install it manually, according to the report."
    Latest rumor has it that Windows Update won’t work on “unsupported” Windows 11 systems. Whatever. Windows 11 is like adding an extra pickle to a Windows 10 hamburger that already has pickles on it. 

    Unless Microsoft adds something to compel me to upgrade to Windows 11 I’ll keep on using Windows 10. I run Windows because I have to, not because I want to. I’ve been using Windows since version 2.x and there’s really nothing about it that gets me excited. 

    Windows 10 is the most reliable and stable version of Windows ever. It doesn’t suck or make me want to throw my PC into a wood chipper. As long as Microsoft can maintain Windows where it is with version 10 in terms of stability and keep it out of the chipper, I’m totally happy with it and aspire to nothing more. 
    Do you update to every new MacOS release?  If so, do you "have to" or "want to" even though for many it doesn't really add anything to compel many? 
  • Reply 9 of 16
    dewme said:

    Plus, Microsoft states a requirement of TPM 2.0 -- but previous articles say that installing from an ISO negates that as a requirement.
    As I recall, the install from ISO thing only worked if you copied a specific file (I forget which one) from the Win 10 ISO to the Win 11 one.  An unmodified Win 11 ISO would still have the TPM 2.0 requirement.

    Perhaps, but earlier Apple Insider reported:
    ""Users with older PCs that don't meet the company's recommendations can download an ISO of the operating system and install it manually, according to the report."
    Latest rumor has it that Windows Update won’t work on “unsupported” Windows 11 systems. Whatever. Windows 11 is like adding an extra pickle to a Windows 10 hamburger that already has pickles on it. 

    Unless Microsoft adds something to compel me to upgrade to Windows 11 I’ll keep on using Windows 10. I run Windows because I have to, not because I want to. I’ve been using Windows since version 2.x and there’s really nothing about it that gets me excited. 

    Windows 10 is the most reliable and stable version of Windows ever. It doesn’t suck or make me want to throw my PC into a wood chipper. As long as Microsoft can maintain Windows where it is with version 10 in terms of stability and keep it out of the chipper, I’m totally happy with it and aspire to nothing more. 

    There's no reason to think that Windows installed via an ISO would be unsupported.   Actually that's how BootCamp tells you to do it.
  • Reply 10 of 16
    rob53rob53 Posts: 3,090member
    When will Windows 11 ARM be officially released? Microsoft has been continuously updating it so I don't think it's just a hobbyOS. It actually installs, loads and runs a lot better on my M1 MBA than Windows 11 x86 runs on my iMac.

    sflocal said:
    Do you update to every new MacOS release?  If so, do you "have to" or "want to" even though for many it doesn't really add anything to compel many? 
    Both. 
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 11 of 16
    Hope they don’t keep the home vs professional version nonsense.
    bruce young
  • Reply 12 of 16
    chasmchasm Posts: 2,611member
    I have not personally experienced the Win11 betas, but based on what my Windows Insider friends are saying ... a fairly large number of damn miracles are going to have to occur in September to avoid that being a complete cluster.

    I am however amused by the Mac-like look (from a few years ago) of Windows 11, which my WI friends never fail to describe as "innovative" when what they should be saying is "clearly borrowed."
    bruce youngbeowulfschmidt
  • Reply 13 of 16
    chasm said:
    I have not personally experienced the Win11 betas, but based on what my Windows Insider friends are saying ... a fairly large number of damn miracles are going to have to occur in September to avoid that being a complete cluster.

    I am however amused by the Mac-like look (from a few years ago) of Windows 11, which my WI friends never fail to describe as "innovative" when what they should be saying is "clearly borrowed."
    As much as I like Windows for its flexibility and ability to run virtually any hardware I choose to attach to my PC, that "borrowing" is "innovative"...for Windows. 🤣
  • Reply 14 of 16
    dewmedewme Posts: 4,640member
    sflocal said:
    dewme said:

    Plus, Microsoft states a requirement of TPM 2.0 -- but previous articles say that installing from an ISO negates that as a requirement.
    As I recall, the install from ISO thing only worked if you copied a specific file (I forget which one) from the Win 10 ISO to the Win 11 one.  An unmodified Win 11 ISO would still have the TPM 2.0 requirement.

    Perhaps, but earlier Apple Insider reported:
    ""Users with older PCs that don't meet the company's recommendations can download an ISO of the operating system and install it manually, according to the report."
    Latest rumor has it that Windows Update won’t work on “unsupported” Windows 11 systems. Whatever. Windows 11 is like adding an extra pickle to a Windows 10 hamburger that already has pickles on it. 

    Unless Microsoft adds something to compel me to upgrade to Windows 11 I’ll keep on using Windows 10. I run Windows because I have to, not because I want to. I’ve been using Windows since version 2.x and there’s really nothing about it that gets me excited. 

    Windows 10 is the most reliable and stable version of Windows ever. It doesn’t suck or make me want to throw my PC into a wood chipper. As long as Microsoft can maintain Windows where it is with version 10 in terms of stability and keep it out of the chipper, I’m totally happy with it and aspire to nothing more. 
    Do you update to every new MacOS release?  If so, do you "have to" or "want to" even though for many it doesn't really add anything to compel many? 

    For security reasons I do update to the newest version of the operating system that my hardware will support. However, I have never (at least not in the past 30 years) updated my hardware or bought a new computer to support a newer version of any operating system. I'm currently running Mojave, Catalina, and Big Sur on 4 Macs. When Monterey ships, one of the Big Sur Macs will be switched over to Monterey, so I'll have 4 versions of macOS running. One of my PCs will stay with Windows 10 forever and the other will move to Windows 11 if it is as stable as Windows 10.

    Like you said, neither Windows nor macOS have incorporated anything overly compelling into their operating systems in a very long time. They are both stable enough and provide a good enough foundation for the things that really matter - running the applications that I depend on. There are things that the operating systems vendors gush about during presentations and announcements, but like so many things that "do good demo," once you get the new OS installed they provide little to no real benefit in your daily routine and workflow.

    Over the past 3 or 4 macOS releases about the only things that have really changed my day-to-day use of my Macs are dark mode, FaceTime on the Mac (with WiFi calling), and ... I don't know, little nuances of improved usability. Sure, there are things that I have to do differently today, like Photos and Music versus Aperture and iTunes, but so what? Operating systems are like underwear, they serve a purpose and are there to support you, do their thing under the covers, prevent wedgies, etc., but they aren't the most important part of your wardrobe, the applications are. Yeah, the OS vendors always throw in some accessory or condiment apps as part of the OS, but they are seldom as good as non built-in apps that are carefully designed by folks whose whole world is wrapped up in making apps they can sell as a main course.

    If Microsoft supported the Office 365 suite natively on Linux it would have a bigger negative impact on Windows sales than the Mac has ever had. It's all about the apps.
    edited September 2021 muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 15 of 16
    dewmedewme Posts: 4,640member
    FWIW, Microsoft is now telling Insiders who have Windows 11 on unsupported machines that they must return to Windows 10. They are no longer allowing Windows 11 installs on those machines. 
  • Reply 16 of 16
    dewme said:
    FWIW, Microsoft is now telling Insiders who have Windows 11 on unsupported machines that they must return to Windows 10. They are no longer allowing Windows 11 installs on those machines. 

    Why is TPM 2.0 so critical to Microsoft that they would turn down retail sales for it?
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