Eye-tracking app Eyeware Beam free to download in iPhone beta

Posted:
in iOS
The eye-tracking app Eyeware Beam has been released in a public beta, with the app providing Windows users the ability to track their eyes using the iPhone's TrueDepth camera.




Originally introduced in January, Eyewear Beam is an app that brings head and eye tracking to consumers, without requiring any extra hardware other than an iPhone. Connected to a Windows PC, the app uses the TrueDepth camera array normally used for Face ID to perform the task, treating the iPhone as a webcam.

The app can be used to introduce head movements as a game input, as well as for game streamers to show their audience what they're actively looking at. It also has a use for training, with it able to show where a player or worker is looking within an application or game, so they can see how they pay attention to events and actions.

The head-tracking feature works with over 150 games, which support Open Track or Free Track integration. The eye-tracking is able to be added as an overlay of a game or a screen within the streaming and screen recording tool OBS.

To use the app, a software counterpart has to be installed on the computer in order to communicate with the iPhone app. For the moment, it only supports Windows, with no macOS support at this time.

On the mobile device side, it is compatible with all iPhone versions with a TrueDepth camera, as well as the iPad Pro with Face ID support, running on iOS or iPadOS 13 or later.

In the public beta, the app is free to download and use from the App Store. A paid version will arrive later in 2021, and will include new features and other improvements, though pricing has yet to be announced.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 10
    boxcatcherboxcatcher Posts: 239member
    No macOS support is baffling
    seanjwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 10
    No macOS support is baffling
    It's not baffling at all if their target audience is gamers and game streamers.
  • Reply 3 of 10
    Can’t games use the built in head pointer in macOS?
  • Reply 4 of 10
    This is one of the most exciting things I’ve read about in a while—not because of this particular implementation in gaming or whatever, but because of other potential applications of the TrueDepth technology.

    I mean, my sister-in-law has ALS—she communicates using an expensive yet limited proprietary device (tobii dynavox) that tracks her eye movements—she is five years in, so hers is not the latest model, but still even a brand-new unit can’t handle super-basic things we take for granted, like group texts or sending photos in texts. 

    The prospect of using an iPhone or iPad for something like this, in conjunction with iPadOS or macOS or even Windows is full of possibilities.
    edited July 2 eyeware_beamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 10
    This is one of the most exciting things I’ve read about in a while—not because of this particular implementation in gaming or whatever, but because of other potential applications of the TrueDepth technology.

    I mean, my sister-in-law has ALS—she communicates using an expensive yet limited proprietary device (tobii dynavox) that tracks her eye movements—she is five years in, so hers is not the latest model, but still even a brand-new unit can’t handle super-basic things we take for granted, like group texts or sending photos in texts. 

    The prospect of using an iPhone or iPad for something like this, in conjunction with iPadOS or macOS or even Windows is full of possibilities.
    Like head pointer I mentioned above, Apple provides loads of accessibility options as standard that many people don’t know exist. You probably know, but I just mention in case it’s helpful: https://support.apple.com/en-gb/guide/mac-help/mchlp1400/11.0/mac/11.0
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 10
    No macOS support is baffling
     Hey there! The macOS version is a topic on our roadmap for the long term. Presently, the focus is on Windows-enabled PCs as most gamers & streamers have this setup.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 10
    This is one of the most exciting things I’ve read about in a while—not because of this particular implementation in gaming or whatever, but because of other potential applications of the TrueDepth technology.

    I mean, my sister-in-law has ALS—she communicates using an expensive yet limited proprietary device (tobii dynavox) that tracks her eye movements—she is five years in, so hers is not the latest model, but still even a brand-new unit can’t handle super-basic things we take for granted, like group texts or sending photos in texts. 

    The prospect of using an iPhone or iPad for something like this, in conjunction with iPadOS or macOS or even Windows is full of possibilities.


    Hi @Tenthousandthings, we’re very happy to see your comment here. We, too, believe that the TrueDepth camera brings a lot of potential to the assistive technology market. And, that a lot of people could benefit from this type of tech evolving as fast as it does. Although, things don’t evolve as quickly as we’d want them to when we’re speaking of the assistive tech/medical markets. Our current focus is not on assistive technology, although this was the main market focus when we started building the core eye tracking software back in 2016. 

    However, a first step we’re taking to support the community is the creation of an SDK that will enable developers to prototype and integrate eye tracking capabilities in whatever tools they are building (accessibility solutions, specific interaction experiences, immersive game experiences etc.). If interested, please get in touch with us here https://beam.eyeware.tech/developers/ or over email directly. 

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 10
    normmnormm Posts: 639member
    This is one of the most exciting things I’ve read about in a while—not because of this particular implementation in gaming or whatever, but because of other potential applications of the TrueDepth technology.

    I mean, my sister-in-law has ALS—she communicates using an expensive yet limited proprietary device (tobii dynavox) that tracks her eye movements—she is five years in, so hers is not the latest model, but still even a brand-new unit can’t handle super-basic things we take for granted, like group texts or sending photos in texts. 

    The prospect of using an iPhone or iPad for something like this, in conjunction with iPadOS or macOS or even Windows is full of possibilities.


    Hi @Tenthousandthings, we’re very happy to see your comment here. We, too, believe that the TrueDepth camera brings a lot of potential to the assistive technology market. And, that a lot of people could benefit from this type of tech evolving as fast as it does. Although, things don’t evolve as quickly as we’d want them to when we’re speaking of the assistive tech/medical markets. Our current focus is not on assistive technology, although this was the main market focus when we started building the core eye tracking software back in 2016. 

    However, a first step we’re taking to support the community is the creation of an SDK that will enable developers to prototype and integrate eye tracking capabilities in whatever tools they are building (accessibility solutions, specific interaction experiences, immersive game experiences etc.). If interested, please get in touch with us here https://beam.eyeware.tech/developers/ or over email directly. 

    A few years ago, before the TrueDepth camera, my brother-in-law's best friend died of ALS.  He never had good technology to help him remain able to communicate.  He once spent 12 hours blinking at an assistant holding cardboard cards, giving yes/no answers to write a speech for a friend's wedding.  I tried to find out from Apple's assistive technologies people if they had eye-tracking on their roadmap, but didn't get an answer.  I hope Apple is aware of the Eyewear-Beam people, and will perhaps collaborate to make their product part of the built-in assistive technologies.  It should be possible to do almost everything on an iPhone using eye tracking and blinking.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 10
    Er, iOS (like macOS I mentioned) does head tracking by default too! @normm ;
    edited July 8 eyeware_beam
  • Reply 10 of 10
    normm said:
    A few years ago, before the TrueDepth camera, my brother-in-law's best friend died of ALS.  He never had good technology to help him remain able to communicate.  He once spent 12 hours blinking at an assistant holding cardboard cards, giving yes/no answers to write a speech for a friend's wedding.  I tried to find out from Apple's assistive technologies people if they had eye-tracking on their roadmap, but didn't get an answer.  I hope Apple is aware of the Eyewear-Beam people, and will perhaps collaborate to make their product part of the built-in assistive technologies.  It should be possible to do almost everything on an iPhone using eye tracking and blinking.
    That's terrible to hear that about your brother-in-law's best friend. We're really trying to get in touch with relevant developers to show them what our SDK can allow them to create. Potential use cases for eye and head tracking enabled software are limitless and can really benefit augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices and more as you point out. We're already in touch with https://www.everyonecan.org.uk and hope with their help we can jumpstart some software development in this area with our what we offer at https://beam.eyeware.tech/developers.
    edited September 8
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