iPhone 13 Pro Max supports faster 27W charging, but only temporarily

Posted:
in iPhone
Apple's new iPhone 13 Pro Max can temporarily support higher wattage charging than its predecessor, allowing for the device to reach full battery more quickly.

Credit: Apple
Credit: Apple


According to tests conducted by ChargerLAB, the iPhone 13 Pro Max can receive up to 27 watts of power when plugged into the right charging adapter. Previously, the charging speeds capped out at about 22 watts.

The iPhone 13 Pro Max won't stay at 27W of power the entire time, however. Testing cited by Twitter user DuanRui indicates that it'll maintain the higher wattage for about 27 minutes. In testing, the device took a total of 86 minutes to fully charge.

iPhone 13 Pro Max uses a 30W PD charger, which can maintain 26W power for about 27 minutes, and it takes 86 minutes to fully charge. pic.twitter.com/qN67104Sem

-- DuanRui (@duanrui1205)


In other tests, including some performed by AppleInsider on Wednesday, it appears that the 27W charging only kicks in when a battery is at about 10% capacity and rising. If the battery life is above 40%, it'll charge at around 23 watts.

The higher charging speeds appear to be limited to the iPhone 13 Pro Max model, since DuanRui said that the base iPhone 13 Pro caps out at 20W. The faster charging isn't available with MagSafe or Qi wireless charging, which only supports 15W of charging at most. Users will also need a power adapter that supports charge rates of 9V at three amps.

Users can take advantage of the higher charging speeds with most modern 30W or higher charging bricks.

Read on AppleInsider
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 26
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 6,007member
    It's my understanding that even with Apple's battery-saving tech, charging batteries that fast tends to degrade them faster.  I don't understand the difficulty in just charing them with a humble 5-watt charger overnight while one is sleeping.  I have an external battery pack to charge my devices when traveling when there are minimal charging options.
    JFC_PAjas99macplusplusthtStrangeDaysmagman1979watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 26
    sflocal said:
    It's my understanding that even with Apple's battery-saving tech, charging batteries that fast tends to degrade them faster.  I don't understand the difficulty in just charing them with a humble 5-watt charger overnight while one is sleeping.  I have an external battery pack to charge my devices when traveling when there are minimal charging options.
    This: though I try and restrict my charge to between 20-70% so I charge while I’m awake. I’ve got the Apple MagSafe pack and an older Anker stick if needed. Either is casually pocketable though I’m coming to really like the no cable of the MagSafe pack if not it’s inefficiency and slowness. 

    Does the strategy work? Well my bought at release iPhone 12 Pro Max currently has a battery health reading of 92%…
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 26
    So, it works pretty much as intended? Doesn't all fast charging gizmos start to limit the wattage after 50% or so? Due to how li-ion batteries reach peak voltage around that point and after that there's diminishing returns, also batteries heat up etc. I'm not an expert, but I think this is just the nature of battery chemistry and not just a Apple thing. Other than they seem to be more aggressive in saving battery lifetime with smart software limitations.
    edited September 2021 thtCloudTalkinwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 26
    dk49dk49 Posts: 228member
    sflocal said:
    It's my understanding that even with Apple's battery-saving tech, charging batteries that fast tends to degrade them faster.  I don't understand the difficulty in just charing them with a humble 5-watt charger overnight while one is sleeping.  I have an external battery pack to charge my devices when traveling when there are minimal charging options.

    ..................................................

    That's fine if iPhones can run through the entire day on a single charge. But unfortunately, that's not the case. I have used 3 iPhone models in the past 10 years, and I have always found myself charging my iPhone multiple times in a day, even though I don't have heaviest of the usage.

    edited September 2021
  • Reply 5 of 26
    dk49 said:
    sflocal said:
    It's my understanding that even with Apple's battery-saving tech, charging batteries that fast tends to degrade them faster.  I don't understand the difficulty in just charing them with a humble 5-watt charger overnight while one is sleeping.  I have an external battery pack to charge my devices when traveling when there are minimal charging options.
    That's fine if iPhones can run through the entire day on a single charge. But unfortunately, that's not the case. I have used 3 iPhone models in the past 10 years, and I have always found myself charging my iPhone multiple times in a day, even though I don't have heaviest of the usage.
    Counterpoint: iPhones last all day with normal use. 
    magman1979watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 26
    chadbagchadbag Posts: 1,800member
    dk49 said:
    sflocal said:
    It's my understanding that even with Apple's battery-saving tech, charging batteries that fast tends to degrade them faster.  I don't understand the difficulty in just charing them with a humble 5-watt charger overnight while one is sleeping.  I have an external battery pack to charge my devices when traveling when there are minimal charging options.

    ..................................................

    That's fine if iPhones can run through the entire day on a single charge. But unfortunately, that's not the case. I have used 3 iPhone models in the past 10 years, and I have always found myself charging my iPhone multiple times in a day, even though I don't have heaviest of the usage.

    Really?  Most days I get by even on my 85% healthy XS Max on a charge.  I occasionally have to top up if I use Maps (GPS) for a long session or find myself in a bad signal area for a longer period of time.   None of my iPhones in the last 20 years have been unable to last a day on a charge over their first two or three years of life with normal intermediate daily use. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 26
    JFC_PA said:
    This: though I try and restrict my charge to between 20-70% so I charge while I’m awake. I’ve got the Apple MagSafe pack and an older Anker stick if needed. Either is casually pocketable though I’m coming to really like the no cable of the MagSafe pack if not it’s inefficiency and slowness. 

    Does the strategy work? Well my bought at release iPhone 12 Pro Max currently has a battery health reading of 92%…
    My bought new 12 Pro Max is 96% and I do nothing special at all. Plug it in when it’s low. Plug it in at night. Whatever. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 26
    My launch day 12 Pro Max is 96% health. I use the 20W adapter and charge it to full in the morning. I usually do that again to full during the afternoon or early evening. I don’t leave it on a charger after it’s full or overnight.

    I guess the only things I could do better is charge it on 5W? I wonder if that would have me at 98-100% health?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 26
    sflocal said:
    It's my understanding that even with Apple's battery-saving tech, charging batteries that fast tends to degrade them faster.  I don't understand the difficulty in just charing them with a humble 5-watt charger overnight while one is sleeping.  I have an external battery pack to charge my devices when traveling when there are minimal charging options.
    All fast chargers charge at a variable rate.  They charge that way to mitigate battery degradation.  Apple is being ultra-ultra-ultra conservative with their fast charging.  They can afford to do so because their customer base is accepting of their pace of development of charging tech.  Also Apple's customer base primarily operates from a perspective of slow charging: 5W for years and years so any improvement seems like it's a big improvement.  

    Fast charging will degrade a battery quicker than low power charging.  Just how much more degradation, and how quickly it would occur, is the real question.  Charging tech has come a loooong way outside of the garden.  Without getting too far into the weeds, here's an easy read look at fast charging that's not from Apple.  https://www.androidcentral.com/warp-charge
    crowleymuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 10 of 26
    JFC_PA said:
    sflocal said:
    It's my understanding that even with Apple's battery-saving tech, charging batteries that fast tends to degrade them faster.  I don't understand the difficulty in just charing them with a humble 5-watt charger overnight while one is sleeping.  I have an external battery pack to charge my devices when traveling when there are minimal charging options.


    Does the strategy work? Well my bought at release iPhone 12 Pro Max currently has a battery health reading of 92%…
    I am awful at battery care. I charge mine to the max whenever I can because I’m scarred from trying to keep my iPhone 6 with charge while limping along for 6 months on a dead battery—I made it till the X was released. 

    I too have a 12 Pro now—acquired on day 1. It also has 92% battery health…
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 26
    JFC_PA said:
    sflocal said:
    It's my understanding that even with Apple's battery-saving tech, charging batteries that fast tends to degrade them faster.  I don't understand the difficulty in just charing them with a humble 5-watt charger overnight while one is sleeping.  I have an external battery pack to charge my devices when traveling when there are minimal charging options.
    This: though I try and restrict my charge to between 20-70% so I charge while I’m awake. I’ve got the Apple MagSafe pack and an older Anker stick if needed. Either is casually pocketable though I’m coming to really like the no cable of the MagSafe pack if not it’s inefficiency and slowness. 

    Does the strategy work? Well my bought at release iPhone 12 Pro Max currently has a battery health reading of 92%…
    Just turn on optimize battery charging in the battery settings and forget about it. That’ll go a long way towards battery longevity.

    I, on the other hand, am on the iPhone upgrade program and get the new phone every year so I don’t really care about battery health. In that sense I sort of wish there was a setting that was the opposite of the optimize battery setting. A boost charging setting that would let me charge from 0-100% in 15 minutes like Qualcomm QC 5.0. I’ll take the battery health hit since I’ll have a new phone by the time battery health issues would have started to manifest. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 26
    JFC_PA said:
    sflocal said:
    It's my understanding that even with Apple's battery-saving tech, charging batteries that fast tends to degrade them faster.  I don't understand the difficulty in just charing them with a humble 5-watt charger overnight while one is sleeping.  I have an external battery pack to charge my devices when traveling when there are minimal charging options.
    This: though I try and restrict my charge to between 20-70% so I charge while I’m awake. I’ve got the Apple MagSafe pack and an older Anker stick if needed. Either is casually pocketable though I’m coming to really like the no cable of the MagSafe pack if not it’s inefficiency and slowness. 

    Does the strategy work? Well my bought at release iPhone 12 Pro Max currently has a battery health reading of 92%…
    I do none of that with my iPhone 12 Pro Max that I got on launch day. It’s at 92% too. Lol. Absolutely trash my iPhone battery between 100 and 0. Don’t do much charging beyond 12W though. 

    I do try to care for my laptop batteries in a manner similar to what you’ve noted. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 26
    ikirikir Posts: 127member
    Even 12w charges quite fast. I love my MagSafe stand with iPhone 12 mini whic charge “only” 12W.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 26
    I just upgraded to the 13 Pro Max and sold my iPhone 11 Pro.  I never thought twice about the battery on my 11 Pro.  I have a Bose sound dock at work and would leave the phone plugged in all day long which would keep the battery at 100%.  Some days I would let the battery run down to 5-10% before charging.  Most of the time would use a mix of my 5 watt charger, my 29 watt charger and a Qi charger depending on where I was and what I had available.  Other times I'd start charging it when it was 90% to top it off.  Basically I followed no rules and charged it randomly with different powered chargers at different times of the day.  When I sold the phone, battery health was 92%.  Don't worry about the battery and just live your life!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 26
    nicholfdnicholfd Posts: 806member
    sflocal said:
    It's my understanding that even with Apple's battery-saving tech, charging batteries that fast tends to degrade them faster.  I don't understand the difficulty in just charing them with a humble 5-watt charger overnight while one is sleeping.  I have an external battery pack to charge my devices when traveling when there are minimal charging options.
    All fast chargers charge at a variable rate.  They charge that way to mitigate battery degradation.  Apple is being ultra-ultra-ultra conservative with their fast charging.  They can afford to do so because their customer base is accepting of their pace of development of charging tech.  Also Apple's customer base primarily operates from a perspective of slow charging: 5W for years and years so any improvement seems like it's a big improvement.  

    Fast charging will degrade a battery quicker than low power charging.  Just how much more degradation, and how quickly it would occur, is the real question.  Charging tech has come a loooong way outside of the garden.  Without getting too far into the weeds, here's an easy read look at fast charging that's not from Apple.  https://www.androidcentral.com/warp-charge
    FYI - the "charger" does not determine the rate.  The device decides how fast it charges (charging circularity is in the device), up to the maximum juice/rate the "charger" can provide.  The "charger" you plug into the wall, that has a USB-A/USB-C connection is just a power supply.  The correct name for it is "Power Supply" - it only provides a power source, up to its maximum rated capacity.

    Also, some of "% battery health" is the battery lottery.  Batteries are chemical devices.  Even with good QC, and the best attempts at making all of them identical, there are still some variances.  I build RC battery packs.  I might order 20-50 cells of a good brand name (Panasonic, Sony, Samsung) and make sure they are real (not knockoffs).  I bin the cells by their capacity.  I don't want to put a "lesser" cell in a pack with cells that have more capacity - the pack will trend toward the lowest common denominator, the weakest cell.

    Heat is a big battery killer.  It can occur when fast charging, leaving in a car, leaving in sunlight, heavy use for extended time (heavy game playing).  This most likely affects iPhone batteries more than Apple's charging settings.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 26
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,430member
    nicholfd said:
    sflocal said:
    It's my understanding that even with Apple's battery-saving tech, charging batteries that fast tends to degrade them faster.  I don't understand the difficulty in just charing them with a humble 5-watt charger overnight while one is sleeping.  I have an external battery pack to charge my devices when traveling when there are minimal charging options.
    All fast chargers charge at a variable rate.  They charge that way to mitigate battery degradation.  Apple is being ultra-ultra-ultra conservative with their fast charging.  They can afford to do so because their customer base is accepting of their pace of development of charging tech.  Also Apple's customer base primarily operates from a perspective of slow charging: 5W for years and years so any improvement seems like it's a big improvement.  

    Fast charging will degrade a battery quicker than low power charging.  Just how much more degradation, and how quickly it would occur, is the real question.  Charging tech has come a loooong way outside of the garden.  Without getting too far into the weeds, here's an easy read look at fast charging that's not from Apple.  https://www.androidcentral.com/warp-charge
    FYI - the "charger" does not determine the rate.  The device decides how fast it charges (charging circularity is in the device), up to the maximum juice/rate the "charger" can provide.  The "charger" you plug into the wall, that has a USB-A/USB-C connection is just a power supply.  The correct name for it is "Power Supply" - it only provides a power source, up to its maximum rated capacity.

    Also, some of "% battery health" is the battery lottery.  Batteries are chemical devices.  Even with good QC, and the best attempts at making all of them identical, there are still some variances.  I build RC battery packs.  I might order 20-50 cells of a good brand name (Panasonic, Sony, Samsung) and make sure they are real (not knockoffs).  I bin the cells by their capacity.  I don't want to put a "lesser" cell in a pack with cells that have more capacity - the pack will trend toward the lowest common denominator, the weakest cell.

    Heat is a big battery killer.  It can occur when fast charging, leaving in a car, leaving in sunlight, heavy use for extended time (heavy game playing).  This most likely affects iPhone batteries more than Apple's charging settings.
    To be fair, he didn't claim the charger decided anything. 

    Modern fast charging requires chips in the chargers, phones and cables. 

    Yes, heat and cold can affect battery health and performance but all the fast charging devices I've used have never shown any worrying degradation over time. In fact they have always performed splendidly. So much so that the notion of fast charging and battery health issues have long been forgotten.


    CloudTalkin
  • Reply 17 of 26
    nicholfdnicholfd Posts: 806member
    avon b7 said:
    nicholfd said:
    sflocal said:
    It's my understanding that even with Apple's battery-saving tech, charging batteries that fast tends to degrade them faster.  I don't understand the difficulty in just charing them with a humble 5-watt charger overnight while one is sleeping.  I have an external battery pack to charge my devices when traveling when there are minimal charging options.
    All fast chargers charge at a variable rate.  They charge that way to mitigate battery degradation.  Apple is being ultra-ultra-ultra conservative with their fast charging.  They can afford to do so because their customer base is accepting of their pace of development of charging tech.  Also Apple's customer base primarily operates from a perspective of slow charging: 5W for years and years so any improvement seems like it's a big improvement.  

    Fast charging will degrade a battery quicker than low power charging.  Just how much more degradation, and how quickly it would occur, is the real question.  Charging tech has come a loooong way outside of the garden.  Without getting too far into the weeds, here's an easy read look at fast charging that's not from Apple.  https://www.androidcentral.com/warp-charge
    FYI - the "charger" does not determine the rate.  The device decides how fast it charges (charging circularity is in the device), up to the maximum juice/rate the "charger" can provide.  The "charger" you plug into the wall, that has a USB-A/USB-C connection is just a power supply.  The correct name for it is "Power Supply" - it only provides a power source, up to its maximum rated capacity.

    Also, some of "% battery health" is the battery lottery.  Batteries are chemical devices.  Even with good QC, and the best attempts at making all of them identical, there are still some variances.  I build RC battery packs.  I might order 20-50 cells of a good brand name (Panasonic, Sony, Samsung) and make sure they are real (not knockoffs).  I bin the cells by their capacity.  I don't want to put a "lesser" cell in a pack with cells that have more capacity - the pack will trend toward the lowest common denominator, the weakest cell.

    Heat is a big battery killer.  It can occur when fast charging, leaving in a car, leaving in sunlight, heavy use for extended time (heavy game playing).  This most likely affects iPhone batteries more than Apple's charging settings.
    To be fair, he didn't claim the charger decided anything. 

    Modern fast charging requires chips in the chargers, phones and cables. 

    Yes, heat and cold can affect battery health and performance but all the fast charging devices I've used have never shown any worrying degradation over time. In fact they have always performed splendidly. So much so that the notion of fast charging and battery health issues have long been forgotten.


    I guess "All fast chargers charge at a variable rate." means something different to you & me.  The power supply is not a charger.  It is a power supply.  It negotiates with the charging circuitry inside the devices, to provide voltage/amperage the device needs.  It then provides that, unless the device re-negotiates.  The power supply generally changes nothing - it is all managed by the device.  (I should say I've seen power supplies that will attempt to renegotiate the available voltage/amperage, or just start limiting the current, if the power supply is getting hot, but this is not the norm.)

    Regarding charging rates vs. heat, generally the faster you charge, the more heat that is generated.  If the battery is heating up, that will affect longterm battery life.  But as you said, most modern devices manage battery charge speed/heat so as to try & not affect the battery's longevity. 
    thtwatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 26
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,430member
    nicholfd said:
    avon b7 said:
    nicholfd said:
    sflocal said:
    It's my understanding that even with Apple's battery-saving tech, charging batteries that fast tends to degrade them faster.  I don't understand the difficulty in just charing them with a humble 5-watt charger overnight while one is sleeping.  I have an external battery pack to charge my devices when traveling when there are minimal charging options.
    All fast chargers charge at a variable rate.  They charge that way to mitigate battery degradation.  Apple is being ultra-ultra-ultra conservative with their fast charging.  They can afford to do so because their customer base is accepting of their pace of development of charging tech.  Also Apple's customer base primarily operates from a perspective of slow charging: 5W for years and years so any improvement seems like it's a big improvement.  

    Fast charging will degrade a battery quicker than low power charging.  Just how much more degradation, and how quickly it would occur, is the real question.  Charging tech has come a loooong way outside of the garden.  Without getting too far into the weeds, here's an easy read look at fast charging that's not from Apple.  https://www.androidcentral.com/warp-charge
    FYI - the "charger" does not determine the rate.  The device decides how fast it charges (charging circularity is in the device), up to the maximum juice/rate the "charger" can provide.  The "charger" you plug into the wall, that has a USB-A/USB-C connection is just a power supply.  The correct name for it is "Power Supply" - it only provides a power source, up to its maximum rated capacity.

    Also, some of "% battery health" is the battery lottery.  Batteries are chemical devices.  Even with good QC, and the best attempts at making all of them identical, there are still some variances.  I build RC battery packs.  I might order 20-50 cells of a good brand name (Panasonic, Sony, Samsung) and make sure they are real (not knockoffs).  I bin the cells by their capacity.  I don't want to put a "lesser" cell in a pack with cells that have more capacity - the pack will trend toward the lowest common denominator, the weakest cell.

    Heat is a big battery killer.  It can occur when fast charging, leaving in a car, leaving in sunlight, heavy use for extended time (heavy game playing).  This most likely affects iPhone batteries more than Apple's charging settings.
    To be fair, he didn't claim the charger decided anything. 

    Modern fast charging requires chips in the chargers, phones and cables. 

    Yes, heat and cold can affect battery health and performance but all the fast charging devices I've used have never shown any worrying degradation over time. In fact they have always performed splendidly. So much so that the notion of fast charging and battery health issues have long been forgotten.


    I guess "All fast chargers charge at a variable rate." means something different to you & me.  The power supply is not a charger.  It is a power supply.  It negotiates with the charging circuitry inside the devices, to provide voltage/amperage the device needs.  It then provides that, unless the device re-negotiates.  The power supply generally changes nothing - it is all managed by the device.  (I should say I've seen power supplies that will attempt to renegotiate the available voltage/amperage, or just start limiting the current, if the power supply is getting hot, but this is not the norm.)

    Regarding charging rates vs. heat, generally the faster you charge, the more heat that is generated.  If the battery is heating up, that will affect longterm battery life.  But as you said, most modern devices manage battery charge speed/heat so as to try & not affect the battery's longevity. 
    I think it's splitting hairs to say a power brick is only supplying power and not charging. 

    They are one and the same in terms of language usage. 

    One thing everyone should be able to agree on nowadays though is that fast charging really doesn't have a noticeable detrimental effect on most users' batteries and that, of the big companies that have long histories in fast charging, I'd say all of them take the chemical, performance, heat management and safety aspects to a different level. 

    Then AI is used to fine tune charging and maintenance. 

    After absolutely abusing my phone in terms of charging (but always using Huawei chargers, external batteries and cables) I only just received a warning from my phone that performance isn't now optimum. It is three years old and gets extensive use 7 days a week. I haven't actually noticed a drop off in performance yet but that in part is due to my wacky charging habits. I really abuse it. 


  • Reply 19 of 26
    nicholfdnicholfd Posts: 806member
    avon b7 said:
    nicholfd said:
    avon b7 said:
    nicholfd said:
    sflocal said:
    It's my understanding that even with Apple's battery-saving tech, charging batteries that fast tends to degrade them faster.  I don't understand the difficulty in just charing them with a humble 5-watt charger overnight while one is sleeping.  I have an external battery pack to charge my devices when traveling when there are minimal charging options.
    All fast chargers charge at a variable rate.  They charge that way to mitigate battery degradation.  Apple is being ultra-ultra-ultra conservative with their fast charging.  They can afford to do so because their customer base is accepting of their pace of development of charging tech.  Also Apple's customer base primarily operates from a perspective of slow charging: 5W for years and years so any improvement seems like it's a big improvement.  

    Fast charging will degrade a battery quicker than low power charging.  Just how much more degradation, and how quickly it would occur, is the real question.  Charging tech has come a loooong way outside of the garden.  Without getting too far into the weeds, here's an easy read look at fast charging that's not from Apple.  https://www.androidcentral.com/warp-charge
    FYI - the "charger" does not determine the rate.  The device decides how fast it charges (charging circularity is in the device), up to the maximum juice/rate the "charger" can provide.  The "charger" you plug into the wall, that has a USB-A/USB-C connection is just a power supply.  The correct name for it is "Power Supply" - it only provides a power source, up to its maximum rated capacity.

    Also, some of "% battery health" is the battery lottery.  Batteries are chemical devices.  Even with good QC, and the best attempts at making all of them identical, there are still some variances.  I build RC battery packs.  I might order 20-50 cells of a good brand name (Panasonic, Sony, Samsung) and make sure they are real (not knockoffs).  I bin the cells by their capacity.  I don't want to put a "lesser" cell in a pack with cells that have more capacity - the pack will trend toward the lowest common denominator, the weakest cell.

    Heat is a big battery killer.  It can occur when fast charging, leaving in a car, leaving in sunlight, heavy use for extended time (heavy game playing).  This most likely affects iPhone batteries more than Apple's charging settings.
    To be fair, he didn't claim the charger decided anything. 

    Modern fast charging requires chips in the chargers, phones and cables. 

    Yes, heat and cold can affect battery health and performance but all the fast charging devices I've used have never shown any worrying degradation over time. In fact they have always performed splendidly. So much so that the notion of fast charging and battery health issues have long been forgotten.


    I guess "All fast chargers charge at a variable rate." means something different to you & me.  The power supply is not a charger.  It is a power supply.  It negotiates with the charging circuitry inside the devices, to provide voltage/amperage the device needs.  It then provides that, unless the device re-negotiates.  The power supply generally changes nothing - it is all managed by the device.  (I should say I've seen power supplies that will attempt to renegotiate the available voltage/amperage, or just start limiting the current, if the power supply is getting hot, but this is not the norm.)

    Regarding charging rates vs. heat, generally the faster you charge, the more heat that is generated.  If the battery is heating up, that will affect longterm battery life.  But as you said, most modern devices manage battery charge speed/heat so as to try & not affect the battery's longevity. 
    I think it's splitting hairs to say a power brick is only supplying power and not charging. 

    They are one and the same in terms of language usage. 

    It is not.  People may not know the difference, but that doesn't mean they are correct.  They are not one and the same, except for ignorant people (meaning they don't know any better.)

    Perfect example - your iPhone is full.  if the power brick/supply was doing the charging, it would continue to try & charge the battery, damaging it.  It can't - the charger & intelligence is in the device.  The brick is purely a power supply.

    Same applies to electric vehicles (I own two).  Charger is built into the car.  The "charger" cable that's connected is merely a power supply/source.  I often have to explain this to people...
    thtwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 26
    nicholfd said:
    sflocal said:
    It's my understanding that even with Apple's battery-saving tech, charging batteries that fast tends to degrade them faster.  I don't understand the difficulty in just charing them with a humble 5-watt charger overnight while one is sleeping.  I have an external battery pack to charge my devices when traveling when there are minimal charging options.
    All fast chargers charge at a variable rate.  They charge that way to mitigate battery degradation.  Apple is being ultra-ultra-ultra conservative with their fast charging.  They can afford to do so because their customer base is accepting of their pace of development of charging tech.  Also Apple's customer base primarily operates from a perspective of slow charging: 5W for years and years so any improvement seems like it's a big improvement.  

    Fast charging will degrade a battery quicker than low power charging.  Just how much more degradation, and how quickly it would occur, is the real question.  Charging tech has come a loooong way outside of the garden.  Without getting too far into the weeds, here's an easy read look at fast charging that's not from Apple.  https://www.androidcentral.com/warp-charge
    FYI - the "charger" does not determine the rate.  The device decides how fast it charges (charging circularity is in the device), up to the maximum juice/rate the "charger" can provide.  The "charger" you plug into the wall, that has a USB-A/USB-C connection is just a power supply.  The correct name for it is "Power Supply" - it only provides a power source, up to its maximum rated capacity.

    Also, some of "% battery health" is the battery lottery.  Batteries are chemical devices.  Even with good QC, and the best attempts at making all of them identical, there are still some variances.  I build RC battery packs.  I might order 20-50 cells of a good brand name (Panasonic, Sony, Samsung) and make sure they are real (not knockoffs).  I bin the cells by their capacity.  I don't want to put a "lesser" cell in a pack with cells that have more capacity - the pack will trend toward the lowest common denominator, the weakest cell.

    Heat is a big battery killer.  It can occur when fast charging, leaving in a car, leaving in sunlight, heavy use for extended time (heavy game playing).  This most likely affects iPhone batteries more than Apple's charging settings.
    I don't actually recall claiming the charger determined the rate.  The pedantic nature of your contribution really didn't add to the conversation imo.  What you did was the equivalent of "well actually it's cotton swab or facial tissue instead of Q-Tip or Kleenex".  Uhhhh, okay.

    Whether the charging circuitry is in the phone, the brick, or both, the fast charging occurs at a variable rate... which was the point.  That variable rate helps mitigate battery degradation (secondary point) by , among other things, regulating the heat generated by the charging process.  

    Call it a power supply.  S'cool.  I'll call it a charging brick.  We'll both be okay and we'll both know exactly what the other means. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
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