Apple making display repairs harder on iPhone 13 Pro is a step too far

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 43

    In an opinion piece I think it would be kinder if the author at least tried to unpack Apple’s position. “Apple claims that opening up repair access to its devices would create consumer safety and security risks.”

    Those “consumer safety and security risks” are very apparent to me.  Last summer, several people in my neighborhood "lost" their iPhones at local beaches, and community members helped the owners track the lost items down with "find my" (why people find this so hard I don't know).

    Last known location - a "phone repair shop" some 40km away (but no, the police won't investigate, and I've no idea why).

    So I guess someone can spend a morning "collecting" iPhones and by the afternoon have a few dollars in their pocket.

    This creates a “safety and security risk” for iPhone owners.

    After iPhone's - the next most common thing stolen here are BMW's - and again, it's for parts.  If BMW could stop 3rd party repairs, they absolutely would, because folk around here are now actively campaigning "don't buy a BMW" because it's bringing crime to the area (particularly at night). I doubt BMW are very happy about the crime or the consumer response.

    You can buy BMW parts as "genuine" or “thirdparty”, but it doesn't stop people stealing BMW's for parts.  Having "3rd party" suppliers for Apple parts is also not  going to discourage or prevent the theft of iPhone's for parts.  Making the iPhone irreparable (except by Apple) and/or the parts unuseful (as described here: the display can be replaced but it breaks Face ID) are significantly more effective strategies for combatting theft and keeping iPhone owners safe.

    omar moralesmagman1979sdw2001williamlondon
  • Reply 22 of 43
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,753member
    Good, if I get a part as critical as the screen w/ Face ID replaced, I wanna be DAMNED sure it's a vetted replacement that will be certified as legit, and not get replaced with some cheap knock-off Chinese junk that may do illicit things later.

    These articles are so stupid.
    Nowhere near as stupid as the claim that a "cheap knock-off Chinese junk that may do illicit things". Like what? Explode? Stop working? Phone 911? Somehow send screenshots of your browsing of anti-China news to China? What is the worst thing that a screen could do, please enlighten us all.

    magman1979 said:
    tylersdad said:
    The lengths to which people will go to excuse anti-consumer behavior by Apple is stunning. 
    The lengths to which trolls try to spin positive direction from Apple to PROTECT consumers in a negative light is stunning...

    Again, please do enlighten us as to how you know this is protecting the consumer? Because you apparently know more than everyone else.
    edited September 2021 muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 23 of 43
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,753member
    mcdave said:
    So you’re blaming Apple because the component swap doesn’t work how unauthorised/untrained ‘repairers’ assumed it would?

    If I try to replace a component on my car and lack the tools/expertise to do the job properly, I don’t blame the manufacturer.

    Did if ever occur to these idiots that, contrary to troll propaganda, Apple doesn’t just use generic parts with unmodified firmware. These fake repairers should be taken to court for fraud.
    If someone has the expertise to swap the display in the iPhone, it still won't work. It'll only work if someone can re-flash the display firmware. It's like a garage changing the tyres on your car only for the car's computer to say sorry, you can't use those tyres because the manufacturer doesn't approve. It's idiotic, as is your claim that people who make non-genuine parts should be taken to court for fraud. 
    muthuk_vanalingamTheWabbit61OpenSourceGeekR2R
  • Reply 24 of 43
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,753member
    As usual, I very much doubt this is a waxed mustache-twirling ploy by Apple to generate some couch cushion change revenue, and is more likely related to authentic security components. I recall a similar story about Touch ID years back.
    As usual your obsession with claiming everything Apple does is for the benefit of the customer on literally every story means you're wrong, again. On prior iPhones, TrueTone is disabled after a display swap. The TrueTone components are entirely separate to the display. I suppose you'd claim this is for "security components" too? 

    The hilarious thing about some Apple obsessives like you claiming that third party displays might somehow compromise security, is that the very nature of Apple's restriction on original displays being available is causing people to be more likely to end up with a non-original display, therefore decreasing security. And your rubbish about this not being a cash cow? Why is it then I can get a replacement display for an iPhone X on Amazon for $70, but Apple charges $279? $209 for 20 minutes technician time? Also, Apple sure as hell isn't paying the same wholesale price per display as an Amazon vendor. You're so full of crap.
    edited September 2021 muthuk_vanalingamOpenSourceGeekR2R
  • Reply 25 of 43
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,753member
    macxpress said:
    IreneW said:
    Is this an opinion piece? Because it makes zero sense. What this article advocates is for Apple to put it’s customers at risk somthat some bottom feeder random repair shop can service Apple products their way.  ߙ䰟鄰 
    What "risk" are you talking about? I have had a lot of third-party repairs to my iPhones all these years, should i be worried?
     It can also make the phone insecure after the repair. Who knows what a 3rd party did to that phone, where they get their parts from, etc. They can inadvertently install a malicious piece of hardware. 
    [citation needed]
    edited September 2021
  • Reply 26 of 43
    I’m thinking of this from the perspective of cybersecurity threat vectors where ic chips and sensors on the display possibly may or can be injected with code that allows the circumvention of faceid security. 
  • Reply 27 of 43
    "Apple could fix this by giving 3rd party repair shops an opportunity to be an Apple Authorized Repair Center so they can get proper training and get genuine parts only from Apple directly."


    I'm sure only honest individuals would sign up for this. 
    williamlondon
  • Reply 28 of 43
    Apple's practice of making repair impossible is absolutely disgusting!! Not only is this bad for the environment, it is also a slap to the face of the consumer, and ultimately robs us of our rights and power; ownership. Preventing sales of apple replacement parts, making it illegal by way of printing an Apple logo on a flex cable and claiming "copyright infringement" if that part is purchased by anyone else. One of many slimy tactics apple uses to prevent repair for the masses. Disgusting!
    muthuk_vanalingamelijahgwilliamlondonOpenSourceGeekR2R
  • Reply 29 of 43
    It makes complete sense to require Apple to replace the FaceID component as THAT is tied to the Secure Enclave. The screen is not part of that. The screen and faceID are two independent components. Users breaking one should have no impact/bearing on the functionality of the other. This is just the typical cash grab by Apple.
    muthuk_vanalingamelijahgwilliamlondonOpenSourceGeekR2R
  • Reply 30 of 43
    macxpress said:
    IreneW said:
    Is this an opinion piece? Because it makes zero sense. What this article advocates is for Apple to put it’s customers at risk somthat some bottom feeder random repair shop can service Apple products their way.  ߙ䰟鄰 
    What "risk" are you talking about? I have had a lot of third-party repairs to my iPhones all these years, should i be worried?
    Maybe you're not worried but Apple certainly is. Apple holds their products to a high standard, even to a 2nd or 3rd hand owner. So if their phone was repaired by Bob's repair and they did a shitty job because they don't know wtf they're doing and it goes to a 1st time iPhone buyer with issues, none of which are Apple's doing that harms Apple's image. The 2nd or 3rd owner of the phone may have no clue what so ever the phone was repaired by a 3rd party. It can also make the phone insecure after the repair. Who knows what a 3rd party did to that phone, where they get their parts from, etc. They can inadvertently install a malicious piece of hardware.

    So in my eyes the "risk" is someone owning the iPhone that is now possibly insecure and possibly with inferior 3rd party hardware installed. 

    Lets not forget that Apple designs the phone to have the owners personal information on it from their credit cards, health information, drivers license, COVID-19 vaccination status cards, insurance cards, etc, etc. If this gets breached because of a non-Apple part installed, who gets the blame? Apple does. It doesn't matter if the owner allowed it to happen. Apple is the one who catches the crap in the end with news articles, lawsuits, etc. This results in negative perception that iPhones are not secure which can make owners (or potential owners) not use the phone to its fullest capabilities. 

    Apple could fix this by giving 3rd party repair shops an opportunity to be an Apple Authorized Repair Center so they can get proper training and get genuine parts only from Apple directly.  
    Really!? As a consumer you care about the 2nd/3rd owner of said device, but not the ORIGINAL owner who’s now forced to pay obscene prices for a screen replacement to Apple if they want the UNRELATED FaceID to continue to work?
    muthuk_vanalingamelijahgwilliamlondon
  • Reply 31 of 43
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 18,016member
    I'm not saying Apple is right to go this far, but this article is filled with nonsensical points.  

    Opening up repair access would undoubtedly help mitigate some of those waste issues. 

    Totally unsupported and definitely not "undoubtedly."  Are you implying that if a third party can't repair a phone, the consumer will just toss it?  


    As with any financial costs, lower-income iPhone users will be the most affected.

    I don't know what this means or where it comes from, but it's completely absurd.  iPhones are premium products.  Having one is not a Right (capitalization intended).  There are plenty of cheaper options for those who are "lower income."  Don't want a phone that can't have a screen replaced at the mall?  Great. Don't buy one, just like I'm not buying a Model S Tesla because it costs $100,000.  Imagine claiming that lower income Tesla owners are most affected by the need for battery replacement and limited service locations.  

    Warning users away from going to third-party repair services is one thing, but actively punishing users for doing so is another.
    ...
    At the very least, Apple shouldn't arbitrarily punish users for making a non-security related repair decision about a device that they own. 

    Punish?  Face ID doesn't work with third party screen repairs on iPhone 13. They state as much.  Whether it's a good policy or not isn't the point.  It's not a "punishment" in any sense.  And honestly, the whole "non-security related repairs" just sounds a like weasel term.  Since so-called Right to Repair is not the law, it's written nowhere that people should have the right to "non-security related repairs."   It's the first time I've even seen that term.  

    Should Apple allow third party screen repairs?  Probably. Are they punishing consumers and discriminating against "lower income" iPhone owners? No.  That's ridiculous.  


    edited September 2021 williamlondonomar morales
  • Reply 32 of 43
    Good, if I get a part as critical as the screen w/ Face ID replaced, I wanna be DAMNED sure it's a vetted replacement that will be certified as legit, and not get replaced with some cheap knock-off Chinese junk that may do illicit things later.

    These articles are so stupid.
    Try reading the article properly. The FaceID hardware and the display are entirely separate components in the iPhone 13. A display cannot do something illicit. It’s a screen. 

    These comments are so stupid. 
    muthuk_vanalingamelijahgwilliamlondonardum
  • Reply 33 of 43

    Even iFixit notes that the cable linking the display module to the rest of the device is "scary thin and way too short." In other words, it's easy to mess up a screen swap.

    Can’t type outside the quote. Here we have opinions. ifixit are not experts in manufacturing, just opening up and repairing. Two different professions. These cables are inside the cramped space of phones. Every bit of space matters. Further as resolutions, refresh rates and additional stuff gets added, the bandwidth needed goes up and manufacturing tolerances goes down. Physics is dictating cable size. Manufacturers have to work out resistance, capacitance, skew rates, while delivering battery life to please consumers. Consumers don’t care about repair when buying items. RFI has to be considered, for preventing RFI from being received and to prevent RFI from being generated. Your traces have to be smooth. 

    Considering how many weird hacks there is and the display is an input with the digitizer, future display fingerprint reader, I’m not sure we can fully write off the display do something bad. 

  • Reply 34 of 43
    digitol said:
    Apple's practice of making repair impossible is absolutely disgusting!! Not only is this bad for the environment, it is also a slap to the face of the consumer, and ultimately robs us of our rights and power; ownership. Preventing sales of apple replacement parts, making it illegal by way of printing an Apple logo on a flex cable and claiming "copyright infringement" if that part is purchased by anyone else. One of many slimy tactics apple uses to prevent repair for the masses. Disgusting!
    What a bunch of DISGUSTING nonsense.
  • Reply 35 of 43
    macxpress said:
    IreneW said:
    Is this an opinion piece? Because it makes zero sense. What this article advocates is for Apple to put it’s customers at risk somthat some bottom feeder random repair shop can service Apple products their way.  ߙ䰟鄰 
    What "risk" are you talking about? I have had a lot of third-party repairs to my iPhones all these years, should i be worried?
    Maybe you're not worried but Apple certainly is. Apple holds their products to a high standard, even to a 2nd or 3rd hand owner. So if their phone was repaired by Bob's repair and they did a shitty job because they don't know wtf they're doing and it goes to a 1st time iPhone buyer with issues, none of which are Apple's doing that harms Apple's image. The 2nd or 3rd owner of the phone may have no clue what so ever the phone was repaired by a 3rd party. It can also make the phone insecure after the repair. Who knows what a 3rd party did to that phone, where they get their parts from, etc. They can inadvertently install a malicious piece of hardware.

    So in my eyes the "risk" is someone owning the iPhone that is now possibly insecure and possibly with inferior 3rd party hardware installed. 

    Lets not forget that Apple designs the phone to have the owners personal information on it from their credit cards, health information, drivers license, COVID-19 vaccination status cards, insurance cards, etc, etc. If this gets breached because of a non-Apple part installed, who gets the blame? Apple does. It doesn't matter if the owner allowed it to happen. Apple is the one who catches the crap in the end with news articles, lawsuits, etc. This results in negative perception that iPhones are not secure which can make owners (or potential owners) not use the phone to its fullest capabilities. 

    Apple could fix this by giving 3rd party repair shops an opportunity to be an Apple Authorized Repair Center so they can get proper training and get genuine parts only from Apple directly.  
    Really!? As a consumer you care about the 2nd/3rd owner of said device, but not the ORIGINAL owner who’s now forced to pay obscene prices for a screen replacement to Apple if they want the UNRELATED FaceID to continue to work?
    Reading comprehension isn't your strong suit is it? I never said I cared, I said Apple cares and provided reasons why they could possibly do what they do. 

    What is considered obscene prices for a screen replacement? Do you even know how much it costs to get the screen replaced in an iPhone 13? Do you honestly think Apple engineers sit in a conference room and think well how can we fuck over consumers with this next phone? Let's make this as hard as possible to fix so everyone has to come to Apple. 
    edited September 2021 williamlondonFidonet127
  • Reply 36 of 43
    macxpress said:

    Do you honestly think Apple engineers sit in a conference room and think well how can we fuck over consumers with this next phone? 
    Considering for a moment just politics in life today, I'd say many people do succumb to that type of thinking, Occam's razor be damned.

    Why assume there's a simple explanation when one can imagine a complex twisty-turny, assumption-filled theory that feeds one's ignorant and partisan biases ultimately making one a master of victimhood? The "oh woe is me" crowd that everyone else is out to get.
    Fidonet127
  • Reply 37 of 43
    mcdave said:
    So you’re blaming Apple because the component swap doesn’t work how unauthorised/untrained ‘repairers’ assumed it would?

    If I try to replace a component on my car and lack the tools/expertise to do the job properly, I don’t blame the manufacturer.

    Did if ever occur to these idiots that, contrary to troll propaganda, Apple doesn’t just use generic parts with unmodified firmware. These fake repairers should be taken to court for fraud.
    You do realize IFixit has some of the best board level engineers in the country dont you, they are hardly redneck,  tobacco chewing dirt farmers using hammers to replace the screens most 3rd party repair shops have better qualified techs then the genius bar and Apples 3rd party repair centers they utilize for component level repair. And most 3rd party repair stores can fix the computer/IPhone and save your data at the same time. Something Apple refuses to do.
    muthuk_vanalingamelijahg
  • Reply 38 of 43
    elijahg said:
    macxpress said:
    IreneW said:
    Is this an opinion piece? Because it makes zero sense. What this article advocates is for Apple to put it’s customers at risk somthat some bottom feeder random repair shop can service Apple products their way.  ߙ䰟鄰 
    What "risk" are you talking about? I have had a lot of third-party repairs to my iPhones all these years, should i be worried?
     It can also make the phone insecure after the repair. Who knows what a 3rd party did to that phone, where they get their parts from, etc. They can inadvertently install a malicious piece of hardware. 
    [citation needed]
    A malicious piece of hardware says a person who doesn't know how a rock works, the only security breech I've seen from a repair was Apples own repair facility where an Apple tech released a private sex video off the phone he was repairing. 
    williamlondonelijahg
  • Reply 39 of 43
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,753member
    macxpress said:
    Do you even know how much it costs to get the screen replaced in an iPhone 13? Do you honestly think Apple engineers sit in a conference room and think well how can we fuck over consumers with this next phone? 
    No, engineers aren't trying to fuck over consumers. Cook is fucking over consumers. But that's a distant concern if a few more dollars profit can be made: that is the goal of preventing repairs. Fucking over consumers is simply a side effect of Apple's anti-repair policy and something which apparently doesn't matter by the time someone needs a repair, the phone has already been sold and the beancounter that is Cook values maximum profit over all else. He most definitely does sit in conference rooms complaining that Apple's losing profit to third party repairs, that forces the engineers to come up with ways to prevent them. Otherwise how do you explain the disabling of TrueTone after a display swap; something that's unrelated to privacy or security?

    I noticed you haven't managed to come up with an actual case where a display swap has caused a security breach. How surprising.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 40 of 43
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 5,804member
    elijahg said:
    macxpress said:
    Do you even know how much it costs to get the screen replaced in an iPhone 13? Do you honestly think Apple engineers sit in a conference room and think well how can we fuck over consumers with this next phone? 
    No, engineers aren't trying to fuck over consumers. Cook is fucking over consumers. But that's a distant concern if a few more dollars profit can be made: that is the goal of preventing repairs. Fucking over consumers is simply a side effect of Apple's anti-repair policy and something which apparently doesn't matter by the time someone needs a repair, the phone has already been sold and the beancounter that is Cook values maximum profit over all else. He most definitely does sit in conference rooms complaining that Apple's losing profit to third party repairs, that forces the engineers to come up with ways to prevent them. Otherwise how do you explain the disabling of TrueTone after a display swap; something that's unrelated to privacy or security?

    I noticed you haven't managed to come up with an actual case where a display swap has caused a security breach. How surprising.
    Do you have a tinfoil hat on by chance....

    Judging by sales of iPhones I don't think the majority see things the way you do. If you don't like it then go buy a different brand phone. But of course you won't. You'll just sit here and spew BS and continue to bitch about how Apple is somehow screwing you over. 

    elijahg said:
    No, engineers aren't trying to fuck over consumers. Cook is fucking over consumers. But that's a distant concern if a few more dollars profit can be made: that is the goal of preventing repairs. Fucking over consumers is simply a side effect of Apple's anti-repair policy and something which apparently doesn't matter by the time someone needs a repair, the phone has already been sold and the beancounter that is Cook values maximum profit over all else. He most definitely does sit in conference rooms complaining that Apple's losing profit to third party repairs, that forces the engineers to come up with ways to prevent them. Otherwise how do you explain the disabling of TrueTone after a display swap; something that's unrelated to privacy or security?
    Citation needed...
    edited September 2021 williamlondon
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