Fast charging the Apple Watch Series 7 requires 5W USB-C PD adapter or better

Posted:
in Apple Watch
The new Apple Watch Series 7 can charge 33% faster than its predecessor but requires users to bring their own 5W USB-C power adapter to utilize it.




The Apple Watch Series 7 debuted during the September Apple "California Streaming" Event. The newest Apple Watch saw a few key upgrades, such as a 70% brighter always-on display, a 50% increase in screen size thanks to the curved edges, and shatter-resistant glass.

It can also charge up to 33% faster than the Apple Watch Series 6 -- from 0 percent to 80 percent in about 45 minutes -- but there is a catch.

In a new support document spotted by MacRumors, Apple states that the Apple Watch Series 7 will need a power adapter that "supports USB Power Delivery (USB-PD) of 5W or greater."

Of course, Apple no longer provides chargers in-box with new Apple Watch models. Users will need to provide their own to access fast charging capabilities.

Apple suggests using one of its chargers, such as the Apple 18W, 20W, 29W, 30W, 61W, 87W, or 96W USB-C Power Adapter. However, the support document notes that comparable third-party power adapters will also work, provided they support the USB Power Delivery protocol.

If you're unsure what wattage your Apple charging adaptor utilizes, you can check the top or bottom, as Apple has shown in an example image.

Wattage label outlined in red | Image Credit: Apple
Wattage label outlined in red | Image Credit: Apple


Apple also states that the Apple Watch Series 7 requires an Apple USB-C Magnetic Fast Charging Cable, identified by the aluminum casing and the USB-C connector. Apple includes the fast charge cable with the purchase of the Apple Watch Series 7, but it is also available as a standalone purchase for $29.

It was recently suggested by an analyst that the "Apple Watch 8" may offer three sizes, with a third, larger size hitting the lineup next year.

Analyst Ming-Chi Kuo has also weighed in on what features he believes will be available in the next generation of Apple Watch. He believes that it will include new health management features in 2022, such as the ability to monitor a user's body temperature.

Read on AppleInsider
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 24
    So the older USB-C charging cable for AW would not provide the same charging speed?
  • Reply 2 of 24
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 989member
    So the older USB-C charging cable for AW would not provide the same charging speed?
    It will not support fast charging. You can still use it, but it will only charge at the slower rate. 
    Fidonet127caladanianwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 24
    Overall I’m good with the old usb-a charger and 5W power. I can think of three reasons why fast charging would be good. The cat knocked the watch off the charger, so it didn’t get charged overnight, charge before going to sleep so you can wear it overnight, and a quick charge to get it above 50% so the update will install. 
    StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 24
    dk49dk49 Posts: 185member
    If I plug it into my Macbook Pro's USB-C outlet, will it fast charge? My pro charges my iPhone much faster than the included 5W adapter.
    edited October 15 watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 24
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,722member
    Overall I’m good with the old usb-a charger and 5W power. I can think of three reasons why fast charging would be good. The cat knocked the watch off the charger, so it didn’t get charged overnight, charge before going to sleep so you can wear it overnight, and a quick charge to get it above 50% so the update will install. 
    Yes, charging before sleep tracking is sometimes needed.   But charging in the morning after you are up, having coffee & getting ready for the day is always needed if you use wear it while sleeping -- so fast charging would, in that case, be a big benefit.

    fred1watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 24
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,722member
    The next question is:   Does a more powerful charger charge it faster?    Does a 20 watt charge it faster than a 5 watt?   And, if that is true, does the  benefit continue as you move up the scale?  Or, is there are point where extra wattage does not help?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 24
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 989member
    The next question is:   Does a more powerful charger charge it faster?    Does a 20 watt charge it faster than a 5 watt?   And, if that is true, does the  benefit continue as you move up the scale?  Or, is there are point where extra wattage does not help?
    Does anybody even make 5w USB-C PD charger? I know the article mentioned it, but I gave up looking after 5 minutes on Amazon. 
    edited October 15 watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 24
    F_Kent_DF_Kent_D Posts: 85unconfirmed, member
    Does anybody even make 5w USB-C PD charger? I know the article mentioned it, but I gave up looking after 5 minutes on Amazon. 
    They’re saying at least 5W PD adapter. You’ll see them soon now that there’ll be a market for them. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 24
    F_Kent_DF_Kent_D Posts: 85unconfirmed, member
    dk49 said:
    If I plug it into my Macbook Pro's USB-C outlet, will it fast charge? My pro charges my iPhone much faster than the included 5W adapter.
    Sounds like a good project and article idea for AI
    dk49watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 24
    The original AW charging cable, and pre 7 Watches, used less than 5W. The AW 7 and new charging cable need at least 5W to get faster charging. 

    I am pretty sure that you do not need a PD Charger, but Apple only sells USB-C PD chargers, all of which provide at least 12W without invoking PD voltage switching. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 24
    Will the magsafe duo fast charge the series 7?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 24
    Will the magsafe duo fast charge the series 7?
    Not likely. Based on various articles the MagSafe duo only provides up to 14W total, and only 11W for your iPhone when using the AW charger, which means that based on my dubious math skills, the AW charger side only provides a maximum of 3W to an AW, not the 5W required for faster AW 7 charging. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 24
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 989member
    DangDave said:
    The original AW charging cable, and pre 7 Watches, used less than 5W. The AW 7 and new charging cable need at least 5W to get faster charging. 

    I am pretty sure that you do not need a PD Charger, but Apple only sells USB-C PD chargers, all of which provide at least 12W without invoking PD voltage switching. 
    Just a friendly fyi…But if I were you, I would refrain from making guesses around here, as there are more than a few forum members that will absolutely skewer you for it. And they will take great joy in doing so. Anyway, from the Apple support document:

    ”A comparable third-party USB-C power adapter that supports USB Power Delivery (USB-PD) of 5W or greater”
    fastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 24
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 989member
    Will the magsafe duo fast charge the series 7?
    No. 
    edited October 15 watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 24
    Japhey said:
    DangDave said:
    The original AW charging cable, and pre 7 Watches, used less than 5W. The AW 7 and new charging cable need at least 5W to get faster charging. 

    I am pretty sure that you do not need a PD Charger, but Apple only sells USB-C PD chargers, all of which provide at least 12W without invoking PD voltage switching. 
    Just a friendly fyi…But if I were you, I would refrain from making guesses around here, as there are more than a few forum members that will absolutely skewer you for it. And they will take great joy in doing so. Anyway, from the Apple support document:

    ”A comparable third-party USB-C power adapter that supports USB Power Delivery (USB-PD) of 5W or greater”
     And, so you know what you are talking about? If someone has better and factual and proven information I am always willing to hear it and learn from it. I don’t have an AW 7 yet so I cannot test the voltage, amps, and Watts used by the new charging cord. 
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 24
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 989member
    DangDave said:
    Japhey said:
    DangDave said:
    The original AW charging cable, and pre 7 Watches, used less than 5W. The AW 7 and new charging cable need at least 5W to get faster charging. 

    I am pretty sure that you do not need a PD Charger, but Apple only sells USB-C PD chargers, all of which provide at least 12W without invoking PD voltage switching. 
    Just a friendly fyi…But if I were you, I would refrain from making guesses around here, as there are more than a few forum members that will absolutely skewer you for it. And they will take great joy in doing so. Anyway, from the Apple support document:

    ”A comparable third-party USB-C power adapter that supports USB Power Delivery (USB-PD) of 5W or greater”
     And, so you know what you are talking about? If someone has better and factual and proven information I am always willing to hear it and learn from it. I don’t have an AW 7 yet so I cannot test the voltage, amps, and Watts used by the new charging cord. 
    Yes, I know what I’m talking about because I read both the article and the support document before responding.
    edited October 15 fastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 24
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,122member
    I’m annoyed about something else. The charger puck for the stainless model no longer comes in stainless. It’s now anodized aluminum.DangDave said:
    Japhey said:
    DangDave said:
    The original AW charging cable, and pre 7 Watches, used less than 5W. The AW 7 and new charging cable need at least 5W to get faster charging. 

    I am pretty sure that you do not need a PD Charger, but Apple only sells USB-C PD chargers, all of which provide at least 12W without invoking PD voltage switching. 
    Just a friendly fyi…But if I were you, I would refrain from making guesses around here, as there are more than a few forum members that will absolutely skewer you for it. And they will take great joy in doing so. Anyway, from the Apple support document:

    ”A comparable third-party USB-C power adapter that supports USB Power Delivery (USB-PD) of 5W or greater”
     And, so you know what you are talking about? If someone has better and factual and proven information I am always willing to hear it and learn from it. I don’t have an AW 7 yet so I cannot test the voltage, amps, and Watts used by the new charging cord. 
    Don’t act as though you’re so knowledgeable. You’re not going to test anything.

    he happens to be correct, and you need to apologize to him. The Apple support document is available, and you could have taken the time to get it from Apple support instead of criticizing him.

    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT212769


    Japheyfastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 24
    melgross said:
    I’m annoyed about something else. The charger puck for the stainless model no longer comes in stainless. It’s now anodized aluminum.DangDave said:
    Japhey said:
    DangDave said:
    The original AW charging cable, and pre 7 Watches, used less than 5W. The AW 7 and new charging cable need at least 5W to get faster charging. 

    I am pretty sure that you do not need a PD Charger, but Apple only sells USB-C PD chargers, all of which provide at least 12W without invoking PD voltage switching. 
    Just a friendly fyi…But if I were you, I would refrain from making guesses around here, as there are more than a few forum members that will absolutely skewer you for it. And they will take great joy in doing so. Anyway, from the Apple support document:

    ”A comparable third-party USB-C power adapter that supports USB Power Delivery (USB-PD) of 5W or greater”
     And, so you know what you are talking about? If someone has better and factual and proven information I am always willing to hear it and learn from it. I don’t have an AW 7 yet so I cannot test the voltage, amps, and Watts used by the new charging cord. 
    Don’t act as though you’re so knowledgeable. You’re not going to test anything.

    he happens to be correct, and you need to apologize to him. The Apple support document is available, and you could have taken the time to get it from Apple support instead of criticizing him.

    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT212769


    Read what DD said without assuming ill-intent and there is absolutely nothing to apologize for. I think we can discuss stuff without turning everything into high-drama.
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 24
    citpekscitpeks Posts: 178member
    dk49 said:
    If I plug it into my Macbook Pro's USB-C outlet, will it fast charge? My pro charges my iPhone much faster than the included 5W adapter.

    If it's a late model, it could.  Apple says their USB 3.1G2 ports can supply up to 15W.

    When you, or anyone else, receives their S7, you can use the System Information app to see how much power the Watch cable is requesting from the MBP's USB port, and verify whether it's "fast" charging.

    Apple's support document, while perhaps helpful in providing the detail, is a bit oddly worded, and the source article headline's seizure upon that 5W detail in the headline is probably more harmful than helpful.

    The Watch models have tiny batteries, a bit over 1Wh, and aren't really demanding in term of charging power., even this new "fast" method. In fact, small batteries shouldn't be fed lots of current.

    As a practical matter, USB PD was designed provide a legitimate, non-proprietary universal power delivery standard, with support up to 100W in its original guise, and that has been extended to 240W in the latest spec.  All spec compliant USB-C cables should have a minimum electrical capacity of 60W, so there is more than enough capacity, and extra headroom built into the standard.

    5W is about the minimum baseline for any type of USB power, and has been supported long before PD wad adopted.  It's a trivial amount of power, for PD or not.

    So, for Apple to specify a PD adapter supporting at least 5W is redundant, and it would be hard to imagine any reputable PD power source not able to comply with the requirement.

    If one were to try to read between the lines, that might imply that the power source must support the PD protocol, and that BC is not supported, but it would also be an odd omission, when there are potential sources that can supply 5W, but not via the PD protocol.  If the Watch charger doesn't support BC, it would eliminate those potential sources.
    dk49rundhvidwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 24
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,722member
    melgross said:
    I’m annoyed about something else. The charger puck for the stainless model no longer comes in stainless. It’s now anodized aluminum.DangDave said:
    Japhey said:
    DangDave said:
    The original AW charging cable, and pre 7 Watches, used less than 5W. The AW 7 and new charging cable need at least 5W to get faster charging. 

    I am pretty sure that you do not need a PD Charger, but Apple only sells USB-C PD chargers, all of which provide at least 12W without invoking PD voltage switching. 
    Just a friendly fyi…But if I were you, I would refrain from making guesses around here, as there are more than a few forum members that will absolutely skewer you for it. And they will take great joy in doing so. Anyway, from the Apple support document:

    ”A comparable third-party USB-C power adapter that supports USB Power Delivery (USB-PD) of 5W or greater”
     And, so you know what you are talking about? If someone has better and factual and proven information I am always willing to hear it and learn from it. I don’t have an AW 7 yet so I cannot test the voltage, amps, and Watts used by the new charging cord. 
    Don’t act as though you’re so knowledgeable. ....

    He didn't
    Why are you piling on?

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