A tiny chip makes third party iPhone 13 screen repairs nearly impossible

Posted:
in iPhone
Screen repairs by third parties on the iPhone 13 lineup are more difficult because of a tiny chip pairing an handset to its screen, and there is concern that it could permanently damage the repair industry.

Credit: Apple
Credit: Apple


On the iPhone 13 and iPhone 13 Pro, screen repairs lead to a loss of Face ID functionality. In a blog post Thursday, iFixit has tracked down the apparent culprit of the change.

Specifically, it's a microcontroller chip about the size of a Tic-Tac tucked into the bottom of the screen. The chip pairs -- or "serializes" -- an iPhone to its display, which causes Face ID to become disabled if a third-party screen is installed.

Apple Authorized Service Providers are able to get around this serialization by using proprietary Apple software to log a repair and sync the new display serial number to the microcontroller. As iFixit notes, this allows Apple to approve or deny repairs.

There's a workaround that could allow non-authorized repair shops to perform screen replacements, but it isn't an easy one. It involves removing a soldered chip from an original screen onto a replacement screen.

According to iFixit interviews with some in the repair industry, there's a sense of "trepidation" among technicians at the change. The only options they appear to have are to buy new equipment for the workaround, join Apple's authorized repair network, or quit.

That's because screen repairs are a bedrock of the smartphone repair industry. One repair instructor told iFixit that the industry "was built on iPhone screens."

However, it isn't clear if the change is intentional. In iOS 15, a third-party screen repair would quietly disable Face ID. In later versions of the operating system, it displays an error message.

A source close to Apple told iFixit that the behavior would be fixed in a future update, but whether that will happen remains to be seen.

Read on AppleInsider
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 36
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,666member
    Does the screen include the FaceID module? If not, I can think of no reason to justify this. It’s another example of why we need right to repair laws. Ironically, it’s the type of move that makes an iphone less desirable. If you buy an iphone at your local store and the screen breaks, what do you do if there’s no ‘authorized’ service center near you? You’re stuck mailing it off, paying more money and waiting longer to get your phone back. There are thousands of independent repair shops that can replace a screen in less than a day, often in a few hours. If you’re trying to decide between an Android phone and an iPhone and the iphone is a pain in the ass to repair, it doesn’t make it more attractive.
    williamlondonasdasdmariowincomuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 2 of 36
    MplsP said:
    Does the screen include the FaceID module? If not, I can think of no reason to justify this. It’s another example of why we need right to repair laws. Ironically, it’s the type of move that makes an iphone less desirable. If you buy an iphone at your local store and the screen breaks, what do you do if there’s no ‘authorized’ service center near you? You’re stuck mailing it off, paying more money and waiting longer to get your phone back. There are thousands of independent repair shops that can replace a screen in less than a day, often in a few hours. If you’re trying to decide between an Android phone and an iPhone and the iphone is a pain in the ass to repair, it doesn’t make it more attractive.

    I disagree. As an Apple user and stockholder, it is not Apple’s responsibility to design their products so that other people can make money from repairing them. That’s total nonsense. They don’t need to “justify” how or why they design and build products. It’s amazing the number of people who think that Apple should be forced to help them make money, like that fool at Epic.
    rob53StrangeDayslkruppmontrosemacshammeroftruthp-dogtwokatmewericthehalfbeemikeybabesrepressthis
  • Reply 3 of 36
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,614member
    Again and again Apple does things that provoke the ire of regulators. It's like they *want* to be the target of regulation.
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 4 of 36
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,614member
    MplsP said:
    Does the screen include the FaceID module? If not, I can think of no reason to justify this. It’s another example of why we need right to repair laws. Ironically, it’s the type of move that makes an iphone less desirable. If you buy an iphone at your local store and the screen breaks, what do you do if there’s no ‘authorized’ service center near you? You’re stuck mailing it off, paying more money and waiting longer to get your phone back. There are thousands of independent repair shops that can replace a screen in less than a day, often in a few hours. If you’re trying to decide between an Android phone and an iPhone and the iphone is a pain in the ass to repair, it doesn’t make it more attractive.
    No, it does not. In a similar fashion, previous phones have disabled TrueTone with a display swap, despite it being the exact same TrueTone sensor being used, since you swap the original TrueTone sensor onto the new display. There is a crack for it though, which is to flash the new display with the old display's serial number. 

    I completely agree with the second part of your post - iPhones are expensive as it is, and so people keep them longer, therefore they're more likely to need repair. Then when they do need screen repair, it's $269 at Apple vs $69 from Amazon. Whereas an Android phone can be had for the same price as *just* the screen repair from Apple. It's absurd.

    Cook is so absolutely obsessed with increasing profit he'll draw unwanted attention to Apple's practises just so he can pocket a few more dollars. It's very short term thinking. The more Apple pulls this shit the more seriously I'm thinking of leaving the Apple ecosystem. Cook is gradually pushing the company back to the ideology of 90's Apple, and we all know how well that went.
    edited November 2021 mariowinco
  • Reply 5 of 36
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,614member
    jtmbin said:
    MplsP said:
    Does the screen include the FaceID module? If not, I can think of no reason to justify this. It’s another example of why we need right to repair laws. Ironically, it’s the type of move that makes an iphone less desirable. If you buy an iphone at your local store and the screen breaks, what do you do if there’s no ‘authorized’ service center near you? You’re stuck mailing it off, paying more money and waiting longer to get your phone back. There are thousands of independent repair shops that can replace a screen in less than a day, often in a few hours. If you’re trying to decide between an Android phone and an iPhone and the iphone is a pain in the ass to repair, it doesn’t make it more attractive.

    I disagree. As an Apple user and stockholder, it is not Apple’s responsibility to design their products so that other people can make money from repairing them. That’s total nonsense. They don’t need to “justify” how or why they design and build products. It’s amazing the number of people who think that Apple should be forced to help them make money, like that fool at Epic.
    No one is asking them to design phones "so that other people can make money from repairing them", but people are rightly pissed off that Apple is designing their phones with the express intent that they're harder to repair. They have intentionally added a chip to the display purely for the purpose of restricting repairs. No doubt someone will chat some crap about "security" when they have no more understanding of IC level security than a man off the street.

    So much for being "green" when they do everything they can to encourage you to buy a new phone over fixing an existing one. That's the definition of talking out both sides of their mouth.
    edited November 2021 Ofertwokatmew80s_Apple_Guymichelb76mariowincomuthuk_vanalingambeowulfschmidt
  • Reply 6 of 36
    rob53rob53 Posts: 2,992member
    elijahg said:
    jtmbin said:
    MplsP said:
    Does the screen include the FaceID module? If not, I can think of no reason to justify this. It’s another example of why we need right to repair laws. Ironically, it’s the type of move that makes an iphone less desirable. If you buy an iphone at your local store and the screen breaks, what do you do if there’s no ‘authorized’ service center near you? You’re stuck mailing it off, paying more money and waiting longer to get your phone back. There are thousands of independent repair shops that can replace a screen in less than a day, often in a few hours. If you’re trying to decide between an Android phone and an iPhone and the iphone is a pain in the ass to repair, it doesn’t make it more attractive.

    I disagree. As an Apple user and stockholder, it is not Apple’s responsibility to design their products so that other people can make money from repairing them. That’s total nonsense. They don’t need to “justify” how or why they design and build products. It’s amazing the number of people who think that Apple should be forced to help them make money, like that fool at Epic.
    No one is asking them to design phones "so that other people can make money from repairing them", but people are rightly pissed off that Apple is designing their phones with the express intent that they're harder to repair. They have intentionally added a chip to the display purely for the purpose of restricting repairs. No doubt someone will chat some crap about "security" when they have no more understanding of IC level security than a man off the street.

    So much for being "green" when they do everything they can to encourage you to buy a new phone over fixing an existing one. That's the definition of talking out both sides of their mouth.
    Actually, companies like iFixit are demanding Apple change how they manufacture things so they are easier to repair. I totally agree with @jtmbin and go a lot further. I expect Apple to build products with as few parts as possible to reduce the amount of products with interconnects (wires, plugs, etc.). I don't know if you've ever tried taking apart an iPhone's antenna connectors then reconnecting them but it is very difficult. You usually have one attempt, the second attempt will flatten the connector. Only technicians who know exactly what they are doing should perform this process. It's the same with new car repairs, it's not like the old days where everyone could easily take apart an engine, reassemble it and have it work. Without plenty of training and all the right tools and computers, you can't do that with new cars. I'd rather both be made so they don't need enough repair to support large repair companies. I don't like designs meant to fail so repair companies can survive on poorly built items. Look at the M1 Macs. No memory or storage to replace means no sockets to worry about.

    All you people who try and compare Android phones to Apple phones need to open your eyes. The majority of Android phones are designed to be dumped after a few months of use. They are cheap without any reason to repair. I just saw a non-Apple phone screen on the sidewalk totally smashed. I could tell it wasn't from Apple because of the display connector. I don't know why any phone repair shop would even want to repair these phones, no money in it for them.
    StrangeDayswilliamlondontwokatmewrepressthisuraharascstrrfwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 36
    I care more about device security than right-to-unauthorized-repair-business. (Recall this is similar to how Touch ID worked -- unauthorized replaced parts disabled it, to discourage a bogus nefarious component swap.)

    Also, having recently had my iPhone screen repaired... Authorized shop (Best Buy): $280. Third-party shops: $480. Not seeing the argument for why consumers should want to bring it to a strip mall repair shop...
    edited November 2021 lkruppwilliamlondonhammeroftruthp-dogrepressthisuraharascstrrfwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 36
    elijahg said:
    Again and again Apple does things that provoke the ire of regulators. It's like they *want* to be the target of regulation.
    Hmm can you elaborate on the regulations this in violation of? Hint: just because you don't like something, doesn't mean it's mustache-twirling villainy.

    Shops can get authorized, and IMO they're less expensive than the non.
    williamlondonericthehalfbeeuraharascstrrfwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 36
    YMMV when taking a device to a third party anyway. What happens when they damage your iPhone when replacing your screen? Do they give you another iPhone that is the same model you brought them? No. 

    Basically it boils down to protecting your device and preparing yourself for when those protections fail and how much do you want to spend to fix it. Do you want the same materials as an Apple display? Then you have to use Apple or an authorized 3rd party. Don’t think there is a difference? Better look again. What about warranty? If you break your screen under warranty and pay for a display, it puts your phone back into warranty. What happens when you use a 3rd party and they damage the logic board by not using ESD safe tools and procedures? Will they replace your iPhone? Nope. Will Apple? Not anymore, once they see you replaced the display with a 3rd party. 

    Since the iPhone X, it’s just not worth the risk to pay a 3rd party to fix your display. Cost wise it’s not as good as the older iPhones because OLED displays are expensive, no matter who makes them. That’s why more people are finding out it’s cheaper just to go to Apple to fix. 
    williamlondonp-dogtwokatmewuraharawatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 36
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,614member
    rob53 said:
    elijahg said:
    jtmbin said:
    MplsP said:
    Does the screen include the FaceID module? If not, I can think of no reason to justify this. It’s another example of why we need right to repair laws. Ironically, it’s the type of move that makes an iphone less desirable. If you buy an iphone at your local store and the screen breaks, what do you do if there’s no ‘authorized’ service center near you? You’re stuck mailing it off, paying more money and waiting longer to get your phone back. There are thousands of independent repair shops that can replace a screen in less than a day, often in a few hours. If you’re trying to decide between an Android phone and an iPhone and the iphone is a pain in the ass to repair, it doesn’t make it more attractive.

    I disagree. As an Apple user and stockholder, it is not Apple’s responsibility to design their products so that other people can make money from repairing them. That’s total nonsense. They don’t need to “justify” how or why they design and build products. It’s amazing the number of people who think that Apple should be forced to help them make money, like that fool at Epic.
    No one is asking them to design phones "so that other people can make money from repairing them", but people are rightly pissed off that Apple is designing their phones with the express intent that they're harder to repair. They have intentionally added a chip to the display purely for the purpose of restricting repairs. No doubt someone will chat some crap about "security" when they have no more understanding of IC level security than a man off the street.

    So much for being "green" when they do everything they can to encourage you to buy a new phone over fixing an existing one. That's the definition of talking out both sides of their mouth.
    Actually, companies like iFixit are demanding Apple change how they manufacture things so they are easier to repair. I totally agree with @jtmbin and go a lot further. I expect Apple to build products with as few parts as possible to reduce the amount of products with interconnects (wires, plugs, etc.). I don't know if you've ever tried taking apart an iPhone's antenna connectors then reconnecting them but it is very difficult. You usually have one attempt, the second attempt will flatten the connector. Only technicians who know exactly what they are doing should perform this process. It's the same with new car repairs, it's not like the old days where everyone could easily take apart an engine, reassemble it and have it work. Without plenty of training and all the right tools and computers, you can't do that with new cars. I'd rather both be made so they don't need enough repair to support large repair companies. I don't like designs meant to fail so repair companies can survive on poorly built items. Look at the M1 Macs. No memory or storage to replace means no sockets to worry about.

    All you people who try and compare Android phones to Apple phones need to open your eyes. The majority of Android phones are designed to be dumped after a few months of use. They are cheap without any reason to repair. I just saw a non-Apple phone screen on the sidewalk totally smashed. I could tell it wasn't from Apple because of the display connector. I don't know why any phone repair shop would even want to repair these phones, no money in it for them.
    These extras add complexity and reduce reliability, doing the exact opposite of what you think locking the display to the phone actually does. I have repaired many an iPhone, Android phone, Mac, PC and rebuilt engines. If you are remotely competent none of those repairs are "very difficult" at all. Fiddly, but not difficult. I haven't been "trained" on how to repair any of the above, but some people do just have the nous to be able to do these things. Those that don't will go to a repair shop.

    You don't like devices that're so hard to repair that it needs a "large" third party repair company, but you are fine with the massive Apple doing the repairs instead? If you don't like "designed to fail", why has Apple had to issue numerous repair extensions for various things such as butterfly keyboards and crackling Airpods? Airpods I might add which are literally designed to fail because eventually the non-replaceable battery will wear out. Excepting Samsung, Android phones have pretty comparable failure rates to iPhones. Awkward.

    Who is Apple to stop me doing repairs and modifications on my own device? Do we actually rent these devices from Apple for a one-time fee?

    How is the apparent fact that Android phones are "designed to be dumped" in any way relevant to repairing them? Apart from the fact they are in many cases designed as cheaply and assembled as cheaply as possible, they're still usually easier to repair than iPhones. Surely they should be all glue and rivets, but they aren't. 

    You recognised a "non-iPhone" screen by its display connector, and yet you find taking an iPhone apart hard. But despite this somehow you know all iPhone display connectors. Impressive. 
    asdasdmariowincomuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 11 of 36
    Terrible. 
    I’ve had every iPhone. Smashed my iPhone 11 Pro Max display and Apple repair quoted as £316.44. 
    Replaced it myself with a display from replace base for £99 however True Tone was disabled as a by product of this.
    This year, for the first time ever, I have forked out for Apple Care + with theft loss with my iPhone 13 Pro Max for £239. If I need a new display it will be £25. This is cheaper than a display repair of £316.44.
    They have me over a barrel, my pants are down and I’m taking it, and they know it. 
    I’m going to hold on to this device for many years now. Gone are the days of me upgrading every year.

    williamlondonelijahgOfertwokatmewmariowinco
  • Reply 12 of 36
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,614member
    I care more about device security than right-to-unauthorized-repair-business. (Recall this is similar to how Touch ID worked -- unauthorized replaced parts disabled it, to discourage a bogus nefarious component swap.)

    Also, having recently had my iPhone screen repaired... Authorized shop (Best Buy): $280. Third-party shops: $480. Not seeing the argument for why consumers should want to bring it to a strip mall repair shop...
    And as predicted the armchair embedded EE/software engineer is here, apparently knowing enough about the hardware drivers in iOS to know device security rests upon a display being genuine. Right. You realise there are no FaceID parts in the display, which is the entire issue. TouchID was only disabled if you swapped the sensor - that is security related, it is paired to the secure enclave. The display is not.

    You are going to the wrong third party shops. I replaced my own iPhone X display with one from Amazon for $69. Works great. Cracked Apple's stupid anti-consumer disabling of TrueTone, and it's as good as new. And saved $200 to boot.
    edited November 2021 mariowincomuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 13 of 36
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,614member
    elijahg said:
    Again and again Apple does things that provoke the ire of regulators. It's like they *want* to be the target of regulation.
    Hmm can you elaborate on the regulations this in violation of? Hint: just because you don't like something, doesn't mean it's mustache-twirling villainy.

    Shops can get authorized, and IMO they're less expensive than the non.
    Here you go. Conversely, just because you're obsessed with Apple and have convinced yourself everything they do is pro-consumer, doesn't mean it is.

    https://news.softpedia.com/news/korea-s-ftc-investigated-apple-for-being-too-bossy-in-repair-policies-503265.shtml
    muthuk_vanalingamcuriousrun8
  • Reply 14 of 36
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,614member
    Terrible. 
    I’ve had every iPhone. Smashed my iPhone 11 Pro Max display and Apple repair quoted as £316.44. 
    Replaced it myself with a display from replace base for £99 however True Tone was disabled as a by product of this.
    This year, for the first time ever, I have forked out for Apple Care + with theft loss with my iPhone 13 Pro Max for £239. If I need a new display it will be £25. This is cheaper than a display repair of £316.44.
    They have me over a barrel, my pants are down and I’m taking it, and they know it. 
    I’m going to hold on to this device for many years now. Gone are the days of me upgrading every year.

    Quite happy to assist if you want help cracking Apple's TrueTone lock. 
  • Reply 15 of 36
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,685member
    jtmbin said:
    MplsP said:
    Does the screen include the FaceID module? If not, I can think of no reason to justify this. It’s another example of why we need right to repair laws. Ironically, it’s the type of move that makes an iphone less desirable. If you buy an iphone at your local store and the screen breaks, what do you do if there’s no ‘authorized’ service center near you? You’re stuck mailing it off, paying more money and waiting longer to get your phone back. There are thousands of independent repair shops that can replace a screen in less than a day, often in a few hours. If you’re trying to decide between an Android phone and an iPhone and the iphone is a pain in the ass to repair, it doesn’t make it more attractive.

    I disagree. As an Apple user and stockholder, it is not Apple’s responsibility to design their products so that other people can make money from repairing them. That’s total nonsense. They don’t need to “justify” how or why they design and build products. It’s amazing the number of people who think that Apple should be forced to help them make money, like that fool at Epic.

  • Reply 16 of 36
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,685member
    Jesus AI, get the commenting system fixed on an iPhone. I can’t even edit the post above to put the cursor below the quoted text. 

    Anyway to respond that comment - as a consumer I want the easiest and cheapest way to fix my device as possible. 

    If anything sees me leave this ecosystem it would be Apples repair policy. 
    williamlondonelijahgmariowincomuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 17 of 36
    Terrible. 
    I’ve had every iPhone. Smashed my iPhone 11 Pro Max display and Apple repair quoted as £316.44. 
    Replaced it myself with a display from replace base for £99 however True Tone was disabled as a by product of this.
    This year, for the first time ever, I have forked out for Apple Care + with theft loss with my iPhone 13 Pro Max for £239. If I need a new display it will be £25. This is cheaper than a display repair of £316.44.
    They have me over a barrel, my pants are down and I’m taking it, and they know it. 
    I’m going to hold on to this device for many years now. Gone are the days of me upgrading every year.

    I wonder if you can think that you get you phone at a discount if you don’t choose the Apple Care. 

    Maybe if apple sold this way it could make the blow of a broken part more easier to swallow. That’s a choice at time of purchase. But apple repair is costly.

    Suffered a Smashed camera lens from pocket height. But I’m fortunate the fix was 5usd where I live.
  • Reply 18 of 36
    elijahg said:
    Again and again Apple does things that provoke the ire of regulators. It's like they *want* to be the target of regulation.
    Hmm can you elaborate on the regulations this in violation of? Hint: just because you don't like something, doesn't mean it's mustache-twirling villainy.

    Shops can get authorized, and IMO they're less expensive than the non.
    He said regulators, not existing regulations. Europe is chomping at the bit to crack down on Apple and other tech companies. When they pulled chargers from the iPhones they ran afoul of laws in Brazil and had to ship chargers to all buyers there. Whenever Apple does something to make their control stronger and push out options it gives more ammo to these regulators who want to reign them in. 
    elijahgmariowincowilliamlondon
  • Reply 19 of 36
    davidwdavidw Posts: 1,617member
    elijahg said:
    jtmbin said:
    MplsP said:
    Does the screen include the FaceID module? If not, I can think of no reason to justify this. It’s another example of why we need right to repair laws. Ironically, it’s the type of move that makes an iphone less desirable. If you buy an iphone at your local store and the screen breaks, what do you do if there’s no ‘authorized’ service center near you? You’re stuck mailing it off, paying more money and waiting longer to get your phone back. There are thousands of independent repair shops that can replace a screen in less than a day, often in a few hours. If you’re trying to decide between an Android phone and an iPhone and the iphone is a pain in the ass to repair, it doesn’t make it more attractive.

    I disagree. As an Apple user and stockholder, it is not Apple’s responsibility to design their products so that other people can make money from repairing them. That’s total nonsense. They don’t need to “justify” how or why they design and build products. It’s amazing the number of people who think that Apple should be forced to help them make money, like that fool at Epic.
    No one is asking them to design phones "so that other people can make money from repairing them", but people are rightly pissed off that Apple is designing their phones with the express intent that they're harder to repair. They have intentionally added a chip to the display purely for the purpose of restricting repairs. No doubt someone will chat some crap about "security" when they have no more understanding of IC level security than a man off the street.

    So much for being "green" when they do everything they can to encourage you to buy a new phone over fixing an existing one. That's the definition of talking out both sides of their mouth.
    That is not the way to look at it from the average Apple consumer point of view.

    What Apple is doing is protecting their average consumers. The vast majority of consumers that purchase Apple products are not like you. They do not repair their own iDevices with parts from eBay or look for the cheapest repair service on Amazon or eBay. They will bring their broken iDevice to have it repaired at a local repair shop. Be it an Apple Authorized repair shop or not.

    So when these consumers bring their iDevice to a repair shop (even an Apple Authorized repair shop) for probably the most common repair, a cracked screen and pay to have it repaired with Apple OEM parts, how would they know they actually got Apple OEM parts? How would these consumers know that the repair shop didn't send their iDevice to have it repaired at Amazon for $69 but charged them $300? They would know because their iDevice would display an error message stating that its not an Apple OEM screen or certain functions would no longer work. 

    What Apple is doing is making it difficult for repair shops to rip off the average iDevice owners. Even Apple Authorized repair shops might be prone to ripping off unsuspecting customers, by using non-Apple OEM parts but charging their customers for them. These are probably a much bigger problem that consumers like you, that want to repair their iDevices the cheapest way possible, using the cheapest parts. You at least know what you're paying for and willing to accept the trade off. 

    So you thinking that Apple is screwing Apple iDevice users like you, by making it harder to repair their iDevices, is not the way to look at it. Apple is looking at the bigger picture and trying to prevent the vast majority of iDevice consumers from being ripped off by repair services, that might charge them for Apple OEM parts but are actually using parts bought off eBay. These consumers wouldn't know that, unless Apple some how implement a method to warn them that they might not have gotten what they paid for.   

    Plus when you're paying less that $60 for a used iPhone 6 or less than $150 for a used iPhone 7 or 8, it doesn't really matter if it has an original Apple screen. But when you're paying over $500 for a used iPhone 11 or newer, it matters if the screen is original. And Apple is making it harder for sellers to duped buyers in to thinking that they are getting an iPhone with an original screen. Instead of one from a $69 repair service from Amazon.  Consumers buying and trading in used Apple iDevices is probably a way bigger market than consumers that wants to repair their iDevices themselves or the cheapest way possible. 
    edited November 2021 scstrrfwilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 36
    dewmedewme Posts: 4,314member
    The latest Apple products do appear to be moving towards improved repairability. It will however take time and several product release cycles for Apple to address all repairability concerns because significant portions of their new products are reusing components, subsystems, subassemblies, and manufacturing techniques and equipment from prior generations.

    Product design involves many trade offs and considerations for several quality attributes like performance, security, energy efficiency, reliability, compatibility, ease of assembly, and now, ease of repair by third party repair shops. As totally new products hit the market they will do a better job of balancing all of the quality attributes they try to build into their product, but for existing products it will be much more incremental.

    We really need to get away from the notion that everything we don’t like about someone or a company like Apple is the result of intentional nefarious behaviors directed towards exploiting us. The product release cycles may seen slow to us as consumers, but I guarantee you that inside a company like Apple every team is always under a lot of pressure to release and the pace of work is anything but slow. 
    stompywatto_cobra
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