Latest Apple betas include Digital Legacy, unwanted AirTags scan, direct Hide My Email

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in General Discussion
Apple's latest batch of software betas include a number of new features, include a direct Hide My Email button in Mail and the ability to scan for unwanted AirTags in Find My.

Credit: Andrew O'Hara, AppleInsider
Credit: Andrew O'Hara, AppleInsider


The Cupertino tech giant on Tuesday issued second beta builds for iOS 15.2, macOS Monterey 12.1, and other software updates. Notably, the iOS 15.2 update includes a communication safety feature that detects nudity in messages sent or received from kids.

In addition to that high-profile addition, Apple also introduced Digital Legacy, which it detailed at its WWDC event in June. The feature lets a user set up a Legacy Contact who will be able to access their Apple ID and personal information in the event of their death.

The feature grants access to a user's photos, videos, notes, documents, and other personal information to a Legacy Contact -- though only if they are able to produce the proper access key and a copy of a death certificate.

Additionally, Apple has also added a new button in the Mail app that lets users easily enable Hide My Email on iOS, iPadOS, and macOS.

The iOS 15.2 beta also includes the option to see nearby AirTag devices or other Find My-enabled products. The feature appears aimed at easing concerns about stalking, since it includes an option to scan for "Items That Can Track Me."

That tab allows users to scan for AirTag models or other items nearby -- even if the device belongs to someone else. If any item is detected, Apple gives users the ability to disable the device so it isn't able to be used for tracking purposes.

Apple is currently on the second round of betas for its iOS 15.2 and related software updates. It isn't clear when the point releases will launch to the public, but the company will likely cycle through at least a few more beta builds before then.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 16
    jdgazjdgaz Posts: 385member
     That tab allows users to scan for AirTag models or other items nearby -- even if the device belongs to someone else. If any item is detected, Apple gives users the ability to disable the device so it isn't able to be used for tracking purposes.”. Kind of gives thieves an easy out, eh?  Steal a purse and disable the AirTag inside? Makes no sense to me. 
    tokyojimuviclauyycrandominternetperson
  • Reply 2 of 16
    “That tab allows users to scan for AirTag models or other items nearby -- even if the device belongs to someone else. If any item is detected, Apple gives users the ability to disable the device so it isn't able to be used for tracking purposes.”

    So anyone with an iPhone will be able to completely disable my AirTags if they are close enough, without even seeing them or knowing where they are? (If you hide one in your car, your bike or your luggage, any random malicious person could just walk by and disable it remotely?) It seems like these anti-stalking features are making them a lot less useful, especially for theft scenarios, but maybe still useful if you frequently misplace things. It seems to me that the stalking scenario (where a stranger hides one in your belongings) is infinitely less likely than the stealing scenario, but I guess privacy is the higher priority for Apple.
    llama
  • Reply 3 of 16
    Did they fix notifications?
  • Reply 4 of 16
    And still I can’t share a tag on my dog with the family. Geez!!!   How long does it take to add something like this?   Lost dog has to be one of the popular use cases. 
    randominternetpersonretrogusto
  • Reply 5 of 16
    And still I can’t share a tag on my dog with the family. Geez!!!
    Just put multiple tags on the dog’s collar. One per family member. 
    viclauyyc
  • Reply 6 of 16
    jdgaz said:
    “ That tab allows users to scan for AirTag models or other items nearby -- even if the device belongs to someone else. If any item is detected, Apple gives users the ability to disable the device so it isn't able to be used for tracking purposes.”. Kind of gives thieves an easy out, eh?  Steal a purse and disable the AirTag inside? Makes no sense to me. 
    The reason it doesn’t make sense to you is because that isn’t the purpose of an AirTag. Apple doesn’t market AirTags as an anti-theft or theft recovery device. They specifically use words like “misplace” and “left behind”. 
  • Reply 7 of 16
    jdgaz said:
    “ That tab allows users to scan for AirTag models or other items nearby -- even if the device belongs to someone else. If any item is detected, Apple gives users the ability to disable the device so it isn't able to be used for tracking purposes.”. Kind of gives thieves an easy out, eh?  Steal a purse and disable the AirTag inside? Makes no sense to me. 
    The reason it doesn’t make sense to you is because that isn’t the purpose of an AirTag. Apple doesn’t market AirTags as an anti-theft or theft recovery device. They specifically use words like “misplace” and “left behind”. 
    I hope the range on this new feature is very limited. Otherwise, imagine the havoc one prankster can do while sitting in an airport, disabling hundreds of strangers' Tags.
    retrogustobeowulfschmidt
  • Reply 8 of 16
    jdgaz said:
    “ That tab allows users to scan for AirTag models or other items nearby -- even if the device belongs to someone else. If any item is detected, Apple gives users the ability to disable the device so it isn't able to be used for tracking purposes.”. Kind of gives thieves an easy out, eh?  Steal a purse and disable the AirTag inside? Makes no sense to me. 
    The reason it doesn’t make sense to you is because that isn’t the purpose of an AirTag. Apple doesn’t market AirTags as an anti-theft or theft recovery device. They specifically use words like “misplace” and “left behind”. 
    I hope the range on this new feature is very limited. Otherwise, imagine the havoc one prankster can do while sitting in an airport, disabling hundreds of strangers' Tags.
    Yes, even if only as a way to try to get Apple to re-think their choices. 
  • Reply 9 of 16
    pjorlando said:
    Did they fix notifications?
    Is it broken?  No issues seen on any of my devices.
  • Reply 10 of 16
    Maybe Apple could partner with other companies to integrate the AirTag feature into their products. For example, if you bought a car, motorcycle or suitcase with built-in AirTag and they were well marked as such, they probably wouldn’t need to include anti-stalking features, because nobody is likely to hide any of those things in something else you’d be carrying around. And if it ran off of the onboard battery (or a usb charger built into the suitcase), you wouldn’t even need to worry about replacing the battery. 
  • Reply 11 of 16
    Maybe Apple could partner with other companies to integrate the AirTag feature into their products. For example, if you bought a car, motorcycle or suitcase with built-in AirTag and they were well marked as such, they probably wouldn’t need to include anti-stalking features, because nobody is likely to hide any of those things in something else you’d be carrying around. And if it ran off of the onboard battery (or a usb charger built into the suitcase), you wouldn’t even need to worry about replacing the battery. 
    Already done (but not quite like you describe it).  Other companies can and already do make devices with "Find My..." functionality built in, but it's not an AirTag made by Apple.  The company licenses the technology/software & builds it into their product.  The item is then paired & findable just like AirTags, in the same Find My... app.

    This article is a little dated (April, 2021):  All the Non-Apple Gadgets the "Find My" App Can Find
  • Reply 12 of 16
    jdgaz said:
    “ That tab allows users to scan for AirTag models or other items nearby -- even if the device belongs to someone else. If any item is detected, Apple gives users the ability to disable the device so it isn't able to be used for tracking purposes.”. Kind of gives thieves an easy out, eh?  Steal a purse and disable the AirTag inside? Makes no sense to me. 
    The reason it doesn’t make sense to you is because that isn’t the purpose of an AirTag. Apple doesn’t market AirTags as an anti-theft or theft recovery device. They specifically use words like “misplace” and “left behind”. 
    Irrelevance #1.  Rightly or wrongly, people are using them to recover and/or stolen items, whether or not Apple intends or wants them to. This functionality would appear to directly thwart that use case.  Nice way to piss people off.

    Irrelevance #2.  It doesn't have to be a thief.  As someone pointed out, some jerk in an airport or mall disabling the AirTags of passers by will happen if Apple doesn't do something to prevent it.  I'm gonna be mightily, and rightly pissed, if one of these jerks were to disable the AirTag in my wallet or on my keys while I'm sitting in a restaurant.
  • Reply 13 of 16
    jdgaz said:
    “ That tab allows users to scan for AirTag models or other items nearby -- even if the device belongs to someone else. If any item is detected, Apple gives users the ability to disable the device so it isn't able to be used for tracking purposes.”. Kind of gives thieves an easy out, eh?  Steal a purse and disable the AirTag inside? Makes no sense to me. 
    The reason it doesn’t make sense to you is because that isn’t the purpose of an AirTag. Apple doesn’t market AirTags as an anti-theft or theft recovery device. They specifically use words like “misplace” and “left behind”. 
    Irrelevance #1.  Rightly or wrongly, people are using them to recover and/or stolen items, whether or not Apple intends or wants them to. This functionality would appear to directly thwart that use case.  Nice way to piss people off.

    Irrelevance #2.  It doesn't have to be a thief.  As someone pointed out, some jerk in an airport or mall disabling the AirTags of passers by will happen if Apple doesn't do something to prevent it.  I'm gonna be mightily, and rightly pissed, if one of these jerks were to disable the AirTag in my wallet or on my keys while I'm sitting in a restaurant.
    It’s not irrelevant. Why are people expecting Apple to support a function that wasn’t intended? 

    To your second point, you’re right, it would be very annoying if people can disable whatever AirTag shows up for them. We’ll have to wait and see how this actually works. It would be very stupid if Apple failed to see that as a potential problem. However, I recall (can’t point to anything specific) other reports about AirTags that aren’t tied to you but traveling with you. Sitting in a restaurant or airport wouldn’t really qualify as “traveling” in this case. 
  • Reply 14 of 16
    jdgaz said:
    “ That tab allows users to scan for AirTag models or other items nearby -- even if the device belongs to someone else. If any item is detected, Apple gives users the ability to disable the device so it isn't able to be used for tracking purposes.”. Kind of gives thieves an easy out, eh?  Steal a purse and disable the AirTag inside? Makes no sense to me. 
    The reason it doesn’t make sense to you is because that isn’t the purpose of an AirTag. Apple doesn’t market AirTags as an anti-theft or theft recovery device. They specifically use words like “misplace” and “left behind”. 
    Irrelevance #1.  Rightly or wrongly, people are using them to recover and/or stolen items, whether or not Apple intends or wants them to. This functionality would appear to directly thwart that use case.  Nice way to piss people off.

    Irrelevance #2.  It doesn't have to be a thief.  As someone pointed out, some jerk in an airport or mall disabling the AirTags of passers by will happen if Apple doesn't do something to prevent it.  I'm gonna be mightily, and rightly pissed, if one of these jerks were to disable the AirTag in my wallet or on my keys while I'm sitting in a restaurant.
    It’s not irrelevant. Why are people expecting Apple to support a function that wasn’t intended? 

    To your second point, you’re right, it would be very annoying if people can disable whatever AirTag shows up for them. We’ll have to wait and see how this actually works. It would be very stupid if Apple failed to see that as a potential problem. However, I recall (can’t point to anything specific) other reports about AirTags that aren’t tied to you but traveling with you. Sitting in a restaurant or airport wouldn’t really qualify as “traveling” in this case. 
    There's a difference between "not supporting" a function, and actively thwarting it.  Bearing in mind that under no circumstances do I think Apple has already considered this issue, and is working on a solution, the fact remains that if every Tom, Dick, and Harry with an iPhone can disable, even temporarily, any passing AirTag, that's basically going to defeat even Apple's intended purpose for them.  Like I say, I'm gonna bet on the side of Apple figuring this out, but it's still a concern.
  • Reply 15 of 16
    jdgaz said:
    “ That tab allows users to scan for AirTag models or other items nearby -- even if the device belongs to someone else. If any item is detected, Apple gives users the ability to disable the device so it isn't able to be used for tracking purposes.”. Kind of gives thieves an easy out, eh?  Steal a purse and disable the AirTag inside? Makes no sense to me. 
    The reason it doesn’t make sense to you is because that isn’t the purpose of an AirTag. Apple doesn’t market AirTags as an anti-theft or theft recovery device. They specifically use words like “misplace” and “left behind”. 
    Irrelevance #1.  Rightly or wrongly, people are using them to recover and/or stolen items, whether or not Apple intends or wants them to. This functionality would appear to directly thwart that use case.  Nice way to piss people off.

    Irrelevance #2.  It doesn't have to be a thief.  As someone pointed out, some jerk in an airport or mall disabling the AirTags of passers by will happen if Apple doesn't do something to prevent it.  I'm gonna be mightily, and rightly pissed, if one of these jerks were to disable the AirTag in my wallet or on my keys while I'm sitting in a restaurant.
    It’s not irrelevant. Why are people expecting Apple to support a function that wasn’t intended? 

    To your second point, you’re right, it would be very annoying if people can disable whatever AirTag shows up for them. We’ll have to wait and see how this actually works. It would be very stupid if Apple failed to see that as a potential problem. However, I recall (can’t point to anything specific) other reports about AirTags that aren’t tied to you but traveling with you. Sitting in a restaurant or airport wouldn’t really qualify as “traveling” in this case. 
    There's a difference between "not supporting" a function, and actively thwarting it.  Bearing in mind that under no circumstances do I think Apple has already considered this issue, and is working on a solution, the fact remains that if every Tom, Dick, and Harry with an iPhone can disable, even temporarily, any passing AirTag, that's basically going to defeat even Apple's intended purpose for them.  Like I say, I'm gonna bet on the side of Apple figuring this out, but it's still a concern.
    I think most people are reading more into this that there is.  There are no details on the change (that I saw -  maybe I missed it), but my expectation is that the user who is receiving the notifications that he/she is being "followed" or "tracked", will only be able to disable those notifications to their own device(s).
  • Reply 16 of 16
    jdgaz said:
    “ That tab allows users to scan for AirTag models or other items nearby -- even if the device belongs to someone else. If any item is detected, Apple gives users the ability to disable the device so it isn't able to be used for tracking purposes.”. Kind of gives thieves an easy out, eh?  Steal a purse and disable the AirTag inside? Makes no sense to me. 
    The reason it doesn’t make sense to you is because that isn’t the purpose of an AirTag. Apple doesn’t market AirTags as an anti-theft or theft recovery device. They specifically use words like “misplace” and “left behind”. 
    Irrelevance #1.  Rightly or wrongly, people are using them to recover and/or stolen items, whether or not Apple intends or wants them to. This functionality would appear to directly thwart that use case.  Nice way to piss people off.

    Irrelevance #2.  It doesn't have to be a thief.  As someone pointed out, some jerk in an airport or mall disabling the AirTags of passers by will happen if Apple doesn't do something to prevent it.  I'm gonna be mightily, and rightly pissed, if one of these jerks were to disable the AirTag in my wallet or on my keys while I'm sitting in a restaurant.
    It’s not irrelevant. Why are people expecting Apple to support a function that wasn’t intended? 

    To your second point, you’re right, it would be very annoying if people can disable whatever AirTag shows up for them. We’ll have to wait and see how this actually works. It would be very stupid if Apple failed to see that as a potential problem. However, I recall (can’t point to anything specific) other reports about AirTags that aren’t tied to you but traveling with you. Sitting in a restaurant or airport wouldn’t really qualify as “traveling” in this case. 
    There's a difference between "not supporting" a function, and actively thwarting it.  Bearing in mind that under no circumstances do I think Apple has already considered this issue, and is working on a solution, the fact remains that if every Tom, Dick, and Harry with an iPhone can disable, even temporarily, any passing AirTag, that's basically going to defeat even Apple's intended purpose for them.  Like I say, I'm gonna bet on the side of Apple figuring this out, but it's still a concern.
    Well, I think the issue is the anti-tracking part. If people are expecting to use AirTags as anti-theft, something Apple doesn’t mention at all, then they will be disappointed by the anti-tracking work. 

    It’s kinda nice to know that if some rando drops an AirTag into my open car window I’ll be able to disable it. At the same time, if my friend drops their AirTag enabled keys while in my car it will be handy to know they’re there. Do I need to disable my friend’s AirTag? No. Will I want to disable the strange one? You bet!

    Of course; this is still speculation. I’m curious to see how it works out. 

    Side question: Tile has been out for a long time. We’re people using them as anti-theft devices like they seem to think they should with AirTags?
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