Canon debuts EOS R5 C 8K cinema camera with active cooling system

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Canon has introduced a new hybrid cinema camera that combines professional video capabilities and a full-frame mirrorless body with an active cooling system.

Credit: Canon
Credit: Canon


The EOS R5 C is a cinema camera that can shoot 8K footage at up to 60fps. Additionally, because of its new active cooling system, it doesn't run into any overheating issues. That means the EOS R5 can shoot at 8K and 60fps "indefinitely."

In addition, the new Canon camera can shoot in 8K HDR in both HLG and PQ formats, or 4K at 120fps video recording in 4:2:2 10-bit color with no sensor cropping. It supports ProRes RAW output via HMDI, too.



As a hybrid camera, the EOS R5 can also shoot stills. It's going to have nearly identical performance to the standard R5, with 45-megapixels, 12 fps with the mechanical shutter, or 20 fps with the electronic shutter. It does not, however, have any in-body stabilization.

The EOS R5 C also comes with a 3.2-inch flip-out LCD monitor, and a 5.76 million dot viewfinder. It comes with dual SD card slots, animal eye detection, vehicle detection, a multifunction shoe for accessories, a timecode terminal for multi-camera shoots, and other features.

Canon EOS R5 C key specifications


  • Full frame 8K sensor

  • 30fps footage, or 60fps with power adapter

  • Active cooling system for indefinite 8K recording

  • 45-megapixel sensor

  • High-resolution 20fps with electronic shutter

  • High-resolution 12fps with mechanical shutter

  • Support for 4:2:2 10-bit recording and HEVC 540Mbps

  • HDR support with Canon Log 3, PQ, and HLG capture

  • Cinema RAW Light

  • Compact body, dust- and moisture-resistance

The ROS R5 C is slated to debut in March for $4,499. It can be ordered from a number of retailers, including B&H Photo, Adorama, or Canon's own storefront.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    Canon has introduced a new hybrid cinema camera that combines professional video capabilities and a full-frame mirrorless body with an active cooling system.

    Credit: Canon
    Credit: Canon


    The EOS R5 C is a cinema camera that can shoot 8K footage at up to 60fps. Additionally, because of its new active cooling system, it doesn't run into any overheating issues. That means the EOS R5 can shoot at 8K and 60fps "indefinitely."

    In addition, the new Canon camera can shoot in 8K HDR in both HLG and PQ formats, or 4K at 120fps video recording in 4:2:2 10-bit color with no sensor cropping. It supports ProRes RAW output via HMDI, too.



    As a hybrid camera, the EOS R5 can also shoot stills. It's going to have nearly identical performance to the standard R5, with 45-megapixels, 12 fps with the mechanical shutter, or 20 fps with the electronic shutter. It does not, however, have any in-body stabilization.

    The EOS R5 C also comes with a 3.2-inch flip-out LCD monitor, and a 5.76 million dot viewfinder. It comes with dual SD card slots, animal eye detection, vehicle detection, a multifunction shoe for accessories, a timecode terminal for multi-camera shoots, and other features.

    Canon EOS R5 C key specifications

    • Full frame 8K sensor
    • 30fps footage, or 60fps with power adapter
    • Active cooling system for indefinite 8K recording
    • 45-megapixel sensor
    • High-resolution 20fps with electronic shutter
    • High-resolution 12fps with mechanical shutter
    • Support for 4:2:2 10-bit recording and HEVC 540Mbps
    • HDR support with Canon Log 3, PQ, and HLG capture
    • Cinema RAW Light
    • Compact body, dust- and moisture-resistance
    The ROS R5 C is slated to debut in March for $4,499. It can be ordered from a number of retailers, including B&H Photo, Adorama, or Canon's own storefront.

    Read on AppleInsider
    This thing is as far beyond my Cannon AE1 as an F35 is beyond a P51 Mustang.

    But, what do I do with that AE1?  It is (was?) such a great camera.   I can't throw it out but neither can I use it. 
    So it sits on  shelf in a closet, neatly bundled up with its extra lenses and filters feeling neglected and abandoned.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 13
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,991member
    A camera with a fan? They should have used an M1 Max instead.
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 13
    killroykillroy Posts: 208member
    lkrupp said:
    A camera with a fan? They should have used an M1 Max instead.

    I would guess that a solid-state cooling device like a Peltier cooler wound be too much for the battery.
    edited January 20 watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 13
    If the headline highlight benefit is 8K 60fps video, where is the consumer/prosumer camcorder version of this kind of thing? Same guts, same bigger sensor but packaged as a camcorder with videography features & benefits focus instead of being a stills camera form factor that also shoots video. I'd be quite interested in a great 8K 60fps prosumer camcorder with a big sensor and at least DD sound recording too.

    I wonder why still-shot cameras seem to keep roaring along the advancements trail but camcorders seem to lag... especially since the headline features of the advancements seem to revolve around video.
    edited January 20 watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 13
    The ‘interesting’ part of the title was ‘active cooling’ and no information in the body!
    I have no idea if the ‘sensor’ is the one that ‘heats up’ or just the CPU.
    Do somebody remember when Apple released the biggest computer with a ”[automaker's] liquid cooling system?
    Maybe this camera uses a [Tesla's] ‘heat pump’!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 13
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,253member
    First of all there is in body stabilization, just not IBIS. It’s electronic stabilization as used on other high end Canon video cameras.

    as far as cooling goes, that likely why. It’s easier to cool off a stationary affixed sensor than one mounted in a moving holder because that can’t be heatsinked. Yes, the processor is also a source of heat, and no, the M1 wouldn’t help, in fact it would run much hotter. Much bigger as well.

    no prosumer version because what you want would cost about the same thing. Canon makes pro cameras that have 8K. Don’t ask what they cost. Consumers aren’t buying camcorders anymore. The sales are very low.
    StrangeDayscg27Alex_Vpatchythepiratexyzzy-xxxdarkvaderwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 7 of 13
    I'd buy a prosumer 8K 60fps camcorder version of this long before I would buy this. This is basically a camera trying to cover the buik of very desirable features of a camcorder. While I'll grant you that perhaps as few as only me would be interested buyers- I'd rather have it the other way: a camcorder trying to also cover the bulk of very desirable features of a still camera. 

    Here's a camera with almost all of the touted benefits about video. So they seem to know what benefits are apparently hot to push right now but are trying to realize them in a package that is meant to primarily shoot one great still photo at a time. 

    The funny thing is that Canon is also a big player in consumer/prosumer camcorders. However, I just looked at the prosumer ones on their USA site to see if they had anything comparable and the most expensive one listed there is 4K/30fps. 

    Call me crazy if you will but it seems the core of this same tech could be put into a Canon camcorder body, mixing in the other benefits of a camcorder device (focused on video) and essentially make great use of something already on hand. Instead, the marketing push seems to be trying to get people who shoot video to shoot it with what is structurally a still-shot camera. 

    This is not just a Canon thing- they ALL seem to be reluctant to get their camcorders up to even compete with select cell phone video capabilities. I'm guessing that maybe their broadcast arms don't want in-house competition priced at prosumer/consumer price points???

    Else, I'd rather capture my stills on a mobile device but- IMO- video begs much more so for the bigger sensor and better sound of a dedicated device.

    Just one consumers opinion though. Perhaps mobiles have eaten up the video market but some of the same people still prefer dedicated camera bodies for shooting stills. Purely speculative gut (biased to my own wants): I would think it would be the other way out there. Then, again, I still see countless people shooting video with phone held vertically, dooming the result to the skinny strip (very thick black bars to the left & right) instead of filling their widescreen TVs with video by rotating the phone to landscape. Conceptually, in a still-shot camera body (or in a camcorder body too), they would naturally hold it in a way to capture widescreen-filling video.
    edited January 20 watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 13
    The iPhone is still the best camera for me. Long gone are the days of needing a SLR and DSLR camera. Have to admit though that the technology in these cameras are impressive.
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 13
    melgross said:
    First of all there is in body stabilization, just not IBIS. It’s electronic stabilization as used on other high end Canon video cameras.

    as far as cooling goes, that likely why. It’s easier to cool off a stationary affixed sensor than one mounted in a moving holder because that can’t be heatsinked. Yes, the processor is also a source of heat, and no, the M1 wouldn’t help, in fact it would run much hotter. Much bigger as well.

    no prosumer version because what you want would cost about the same thing. Canon makes pro cameras that have 8K. Don’t ask what they cost. Consumers aren’t buying camcorders anymore. The sales are very low.
    So the distinction is between “in-body image stabilization” and “In-Body Image Stabilization” (which is what IBIS stands for)?

    The guys at DP Review speculated that they may not have included it because it makes less sense in a camera intended for video use, since vibration can damage the systems and gimbals make more sense. Which is not to say that your theory is wrong, of course.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 13
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,253member
    I'd buy a prosumer 8K 60fps camcorder version of this long before I would buy this. This is basically a camera trying to cover the buik of very desirable features of a camcorder. While I'll grant you that perhaps as few as only me would be interested buyers- I'd rather have it the other way: a camcorder trying to also cover the bulk of very desirable features of a still camera. 

    Here's a camera with almost all of the touted benefits about video. So they seem to know what benefits are apparently hot to push right now but are trying to realize them in a package that is meant to primarily shoot one great still photo at a time. 

    The funny thing is that Canon is also a big player in consumer/prosumer camcorders. However, I just looked at the prosumer ones on their USA site to see if they had anything comparable and the most expensive one listed there is 4K/30fps. 

    Call me crazy if you will but it seems the core of this same tech could be put into a Canon camcorder body, mixing in the other benefits of a camcorder device (focused on video) and essentially make great use of something already on hand. Instead, the marketing push seems to be trying to get people who shoot video to shoot it with what is structurally a still-shot camera. 

    This is not just a Canon thing- they ALL seem to be reluctant to get their camcorders up to even compete with select cell phone video capabilities. I'm guessing that maybe their broadcast arms don't want in-house competition priced at prosumer/consumer price points???

    Else, I'd rather capture my stills on a mobile device but- IMO- video begs much more so for the bigger sensor and better sound of a dedicated device.

    Just one consumers opinion though. Perhaps mobiles have eaten up the video market but some of the same people still prefer dedicated camera bodies for shooting stills. Purely speculative gut (biased to my own wants): I would think it would be the other way out there. Then, again, I still see countless people shooting video with phone held vertically, dooming the result to the skinny strip (very thick black bars to the left & right) instead of filling their widescreen TVs with video by rotating the phone to landscape. Conceptually, in a still-shot camera body (or in a camcorder body too), they would naturally hold it in a way to capture widescreen-filling video.
    Because as I already mentioned, fewer camcordered are bought every year. And 8K/60Hz is expensive to make. That’s why you’re not seeing them. Samsung has 8K in a phone or two, but it’s total crap. Next year, Apple may as well, it won’t be great.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 13
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,253member
    melgross said:
    First of all there is in body stabilization, just not IBIS. It’s electronic stabilization as used on other high end Canon video cameras.

    as far as cooling goes, that likely why. It’s easier to cool off a stationary affixed sensor than one mounted in a moving holder because that can’t be heatsinked. Yes, the processor is also a source of heat, and no, the M1 wouldn’t help, in fact it would run much hotter. Much bigger as well.

    no prosumer version because what you want would cost about the same thing. Canon makes pro cameras that have 8K. Don’t ask what they cost. Consumers aren’t buying camcorders anymore. The sales are very low.
    So the distinction is between “in-body image stabilization” and “In-Body Image Stabilization” (which is what IBIS stands for)?

    The guys at DP Review speculated that they may not have included it because it makes less sense in a camera intended for video use, since vibration can damage the systems and gimbals make more sense. Which is not to say that your theory is wrong, of course.
    I find the terminology to be funny at times. What would you call electronic stabilization that works (necessarily) in body? But yeah, they’ve standardized on IBIS as meaning a sensor that moves for corrections. These sensors get hot, and are cooled in HiRez video cameras. When they heat up their noise levels go up considerably.

    from Canon:

    • Coordinated image stabilization (with Canon lenses equipped with optical IS) helps to correct hand-shake and better anti-vibration performance than electronic IS alone
    Notice the last four words; “…than electronic IS alone”
    edited January 20 watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 13
    Why does the video embedded with the article has nothing to do with the subject?  Just wastes bandwidth.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 13
    iOS_Guy80 said:
    The iPhone is still the best camera for me. Long gone are the days of needing a SLR and DSLR camera. Have to admit though that the technology in these cameras are impressive.
    The iPhone Camera is quite good as long as you don't need a capable telephoto lens and as long as low light conditions can be handled by the algorithms used in the iPhone.
    For serious photography a modern system camera with interchangeable lenses is still a must.
    edited January 21 watto_cobra
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