All-female Apple Developer Academy in Saudi Arabia opens to students

Posted:
in iOS
Apple has opened its first Apple Developer Academy in the Middle East and North Africa region, with its Riyadh, Saudi Arabia academy dedicated to teaching aspiring female developers.

Saudi Arabia Apple Developer Academy [via Apple]


Initially announced in July 2021, the Riyadh Apple Developer Academy has now started to teach students about programming and design, with a view to participants having a career in the app economy.

The academy has welcomed female students across the region, aged between 20 to 35, with backgrounds ranging from IT and finance to art, law, and medicine, reports Khaleej Times. More than 600 women per year are expected to take part in courses offered by the academy, including 30-day introductory foundation courses and the 10-month Academy program.

"At Apple we're committed to ensuring everyone has the tools and resources to thrive in the app economy and be part of that transformation," said Apple VP of Education and Enterprise Marketing Susan Prescott. "Through the power of technology and innovation, we are proud to be helping prepare these leaders for new career and entrepreneurship opportunities."

The academy was launched in collaboration with Princess Nourah University and Tuwaiq Academy, and in partnership with the Saudi Federation for Cyber Security, Programming, and Drones.

Apple Developer Academy Director Ohood Mohamed Al Nayel sai "Our goal is to become the region's premier center for female iOS developers while supporting them in becoming active and effective entrepreneurs leading the digital transformation of the kingdom of Saudi Arabia."

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 14
    Maybe teach the women how to inspect their iPhones for NSO Pegasus spyware. Apple should not be supporting Saudi oppression of women with this philanthrocapitalism. It only reinforces their subservience. "Look, women can program computers while wearing a burqa!"
    williamlondon
  • Reply 2 of 14
    charles1 said:
    Maybe teach the women how to inspect their iPhones for NSO Pegasus spyware. Apple should not be supporting Saudi oppression of women with this philanthrocapitalism. It only reinforces their subservience. "Look, women can program computers while wearing a burqa!"
    What they wear is irrelevant. They are gaining a needed skill that fosters independence. 
    lolliverwilliamlondonviclauyycbyronl
  • Reply 3 of 14
    charles1 said:
    Maybe teach the women how to inspect their iPhones for NSO Pegasus spyware. Apple should not be supporting Saudi oppression of women with this philanthrocapitalism. It only reinforces their subservience. "Look, women can program computers while wearing a burqa!"
    Why does everyone in the west believe that women wearing their what they want is a sign of oppression? They are not looking for someone to save them because they don’t need to be saved. Being half naked isn’t even a sign of anything just being morally loose
    Japhey
  • Reply 4 of 14
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 2,937member

    Saudi Arabia imprisons, tortures and executes people for being gay. And yet Apple chooses to reward Saudi Arabia with programs like this? Does Apple protest human rights anywhere? Oh yes, I forgot, Apple protests restrictions on which bathrooms LGBTQ people can use in Texas, but notice that Apple doesn't ever protest imprisonment of gays in other countries. I presume any protest would hurt Apple's sales. So Apple punishes Texas economically for a small crime, but rewards Saudi Arabia for a big crime?

    https://www.inc.com/salvador-rodriguez/tech-texas-bathroom-bill.html <--

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_rights_in_Saudi_Arabia#LGBT_rights <--

    To be fair, I think Apple has the legal right to refuse to do business in any state where Apple doesn't like the bathroom laws, but I only wish Apple would speak up once about human rights in the world and refuse to do business in regimes that are so brutal they would/could actually execute the CEO of Apple if he visited there because of his sexual orientation.


    elijahgbyronl
  • Reply 5 of 14
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,593member

    Saudi Arabia imprisons, tortures and executes people for being gay. And yet Apple chooses to reward Saudi Arabia with programs like this? Does Apple protest human rights anywhere? Oh yes, I forgot, Apple protests restrictions on which bathrooms LGBTQ people can use in Texas, but notice that Apple doesn't ever protest imprisonment of gays in other countries. I presume any protest would hurt Apple's sales. So Apple punishes Texas economically for a small crime, but rewards Saudi Arabia for a big crime?

    https://www.inc.com/salvador-rodriguez/tech-texas-bathroom-bill.html <--

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_rights_in_Saudi_Arabia#LGBT_rights <--

    To be fair, I think Apple has the legal right to refuse to do business in any state where Apple doesn't like the bathroom laws, but I only wish Apple would speak up once about human rights in the world and refuse to do business in regimes that are so brutal they would/could actually execute the CEO of Apple if he visited there because of his sexual orientation.

    Unfortunately is what happens when you have a CEO that is driven entirely by profit above all else. Progressive statements/actions that apply only to the locations where it won't affect Apple's profit means they're doing nothing more than virtue signalling. Statements aimed at supporting people where it'll make a real difference, i.e. calling out regimes for their backwards laws despite a potential hit to profit would have much more effect and also garner much more respect. 
    edited February 5 Alex_Vbyronlmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 6 of 14
    corp1corp1 Posts: 71member
    shiriajin said:
    Why does everyone in the west believe that women wearing their what they want is a sign of oppression?
    As you suggest, it's the unjust laws, regulations, and restrictions targeted at women that are a sign of oppression. I've heard that in the past some countries have tried to prevent women from voting, running for political office, driving, riding public transport, traveling, attending school – even dancing to music or attending soccer matches.

    Thankfully we're beyond that in the 21st century.

    edited February 6 elijahgbyronlStrangeDays
  • Reply 7 of 14
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,067member
    shiriajin said:
    charles1 said:
    Maybe teach the women how to inspect their iPhones for NSO Pegasus spyware. Apple should not be supporting Saudi oppression of women with this philanthrocapitalism. It only reinforces their subservience. "Look, women can program computers while wearing a burqa!"
    Why does everyone in the west believe that women wearing their what they want is a sign of oppression? They are not looking for someone to save them because they don’t need to be saved. Being half naked isn’t even a sign of anything just being morally loose
    Not having to hide your body in a bag or face behind a veil because men supposedly can’t control their temptation is a good thing. Women hidden from view cannot by definition work as equals in society. 
    muthuk_vanalingamnotafan289
  • Reply 8 of 14
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,067member
    elijahg said:

    Saudi Arabia imprisons, tortures and executes people for being gay. And yet Apple chooses to reward Saudi Arabia with programs like this? Does Apple protest human rights anywhere? Oh yes, I forgot, Apple protests restrictions on which bathrooms LGBTQ people can use in Texas, but notice that Apple doesn't ever protest imprisonment of gays in other countries. I presume any protest would hurt Apple's sales. So Apple punishes Texas economically for a small crime, but rewards Saudi Arabia for a big crime?

    https://www.inc.com/salvador-rodriguez/tech-texas-bathroom-bill.html <--

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_rights_in_Saudi_Arabia#LGBT_rights <--

    To be fair, I think Apple has the legal right to refuse to do business in any state where Apple doesn't like the bathroom laws, but I only wish Apple would speak up once about human rights in the world and refuse to do business in regimes that are so brutal they would/could actually execute the CEO of Apple if he visited there because of his sexual orientation.

    Unfortunately is what happens when you have a CEO that is driven entirely by profit above all else. Progressive statements/actions that apply only to the locations where it won't affect Apple's profit means they're doing nothing more than virtue signalling. Statements aimed at supporting people where it'll make a real difference, i.e. calling out regimes for their backwards laws despite a potential hit to profit would have much more effect and also garner much more respect. 
    You’re quite confused and apparently ignorant about Apple’s executive history. Cook has famously been grilled for not pursuing “the bloody ROI” and engaging in efforts with no major pay off, like developing the most handicapped accessible OS on the market, or its green and recycling efforts, etc etc. Apple cannot change laws in a kingdom. The notion that SA represents some huge profit center is likely also untrue. 
    edited February 8 radarthekat
  • Reply 9 of 14
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,496moderator
    elijahg said:

    Saudi Arabia imprisons, tortures and executes people for being gay. And yet Apple chooses to reward Saudi Arabia with programs like this? Does Apple protest human rights anywhere? Oh yes, I forgot, Apple protests restrictions on which bathrooms LGBTQ people can use in Texas, but notice that Apple doesn't ever protest imprisonment of gays in other countries. I presume any protest would hurt Apple's sales. So Apple punishes Texas economically for a small crime, but rewards Saudi Arabia for a big crime?

    https://www.inc.com/salvador-rodriguez/tech-texas-bathroom-bill.html <--

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_rights_in_Saudi_Arabia#LGBT_rights <--

    To be fair, I think Apple has the legal right to refuse to do business in any state where Apple doesn't like the bathroom laws, but I only wish Apple would speak up once about human rights in the world and refuse to do business in regimes that are so brutal they would/could actually execute the CEO of Apple if he visited there because of his sexual orientation.

    Unfortunately is what happens when you have a CEO that is driven entirely by profit above all else. Progressive statements/actions that apply only to the locations where it won't affect Apple's profit means they're doing nothing more than virtue signalling. Statements aimed at supporting people where it'll make a real difference, i.e. calling out regimes for their backwards laws despite a potential hit to profit would have much more effect and also garner much more respect. 
    You’re quite confused and apparently ignorant about Apple’s executive history. Cook has famously been grilled for not pursuing “the bloody ROI” and engaging in efforts with no major pay off, like developing the most handicapped accessible OS on the market, or its green and recycling efforts, etc etc. Apple cannot change laws in a kingdom. The notion that SA represents some huge profit center is likely also untrue. 
    Exactly.  And well said.  Some people would have Apple wait until all human rights issues are resolved in a country (China, Saudi Arabia, et al) before engaging in business in that country.  As though Apple could, through disengagement, affect the needed changes.  As though Apple doing business in these countries is somehow condoning the human rights abuses.  

    A person capable of critical thinking might weigh two approaches.  

    A ) boycott any country that has any record of human rights abuses or worker safety issues or gender inequality or any number of other transgressions, until all such transgressions are satisfactorily resolved in the eyes of the larger world, or

    B ) recognize the reality that sovereign nations don’t all share the same ideals or apply the same values with respect to treatment of people, and that some that don’t share western ideals or values have their own ideals and values based deeply in their religious beliefs and cultural histories.  And further recognize that western values actually espouse freedom of, and respect for, the religious beliefs of others who don’t share your own.  In this context it might be better to engage with these nations and their societies in an effort to foster mutual respect and understanding and perhaps bring about change through deeper engagement and mutual goals.  

    Option B is the option Apple has chosen and that Tim Cook has on multiple occasions directly stated.  And if you think about the futility of changing deeply ingrained religious or cultural beliefs, attitudes and behaviors, you might well come to understand why Apple has chosen to engage rather than to directly oppose.  It just makes sense.  

    Considering the whole context with profit in mind, it further makes sense to engage rather than to oppose, as boycotting does little to change but will do much to open the door and hand the market to those with less scruples.  The Samsungs and others of the world will happily take over those markets.  This would weaken Apple.  I’d rather have piles of money pouring into the coffers of a company that gives a damn and has integrity, that can and does use some of those profits to effect positive change, than into the coffers of their competition.  

    Think different! 
    edited February 8
  • Reply 10 of 14

    Saudi Arabia imprisons, tortures and executes people for being gay. And yet Apple chooses to reward Saudi Arabia with programs like this? Does Apple protest human rights anywhere? Oh yes, I forgot, Apple protests restrictions on which bathrooms LGBTQ people can use in Texas, but notice that Apple doesn't ever protest imprisonment of gays in other countries. I presume any protest would hurt Apple's sales. So Apple punishes Texas economically for a small crime, but rewards Saudi Arabia for a big crime?

    https://www.inc.com/salvador-rodriguez/tech-texas-bathroom-bill.html <--

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_rights_in_Saudi_Arabia#LGBT_rights <--

    To be fair, I think Apple has the legal right to refuse to do business in any state where Apple doesn't like the bathroom laws, but I only wish Apple would speak up once about human rights in the world and refuse to do business in regimes that are so brutal they would/could actually execute the CEO of Apple if he visited there because of his sexual orientation.


    Out of curiosity, are you LGBTQ+ ?
  • Reply 11 of 14

    Saudi Arabia imprisons, tortures and executes people for being gay. And yet Apple chooses to reward Saudi Arabia with programs like this? Does Apple protest human rights anywhere? Oh yes, I forgot, Apple protests restrictions on which bathrooms LGBTQ people can use in Texas, but notice that Apple doesn't ever protest imprisonment of gays in other countries. I presume any protest would hurt Apple's sales. So Apple punishes Texas economically for a small crime, but rewards Saudi Arabia for a big crime?

    https://www.inc.com/salvador-rodriguez/tech-texas-bathroom-bill.html <--

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_rights_in_Saudi_Arabia#LGBT_rights <--

    To be fair, I think Apple has the legal right to refuse to do business in any state where Apple doesn't like the bathroom laws, but I only wish Apple would speak up once about human rights in the world and refuse to do business in regimes that are so brutal they would/could actually execute the CEO of Apple if he visited there because of his sexual orientation.


    Out of curiosity, are you LGBTQ+ ?
    Why should he reveal that in a discussion forum?
  • Reply 12 of 14
    shiriajin said:
    charles1 said:
    Maybe teach the women how to inspect their iPhones for NSO Pegasus spyware. Apple should not be supporting Saudi oppression of women with this philanthrocapitalism. It only reinforces their subservience. "Look, women can program computers while wearing a burqa!"
    Why does everyone in the west believe that women wearing their what they want is a sign of oppression? They are not looking for someone to save them because they don’t need to be saved. Being half naked isn’t even a sign of anything just being morally loose
    They’re not wearing what they want. Unless 100% happen to prefer being covered up in 100 degree heat 365 days a year. Are you really that clueless. 
  • Reply 13 of 14
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 2,937member

    Saudi Arabia imprisons, tortures and executes people for being gay. And yet Apple chooses to reward Saudi Arabia with programs like this? Does Apple protest human rights anywhere? Oh yes, I forgot, Apple protests restrictions on which bathrooms LGBTQ people can use in Texas, but notice that Apple doesn't ever protest imprisonment of gays in other countries. I presume any protest would hurt Apple's sales. So Apple punishes Texas economically for a small crime, but rewards Saudi Arabia for a big crime?

    https://www.inc.com/salvador-rodriguez/tech-texas-bathroom-bill.html <--

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_rights_in_Saudi_Arabia#LGBT_rights <--

    To be fair, I think Apple has the legal right to refuse to do business in any state where Apple doesn't like the bathroom laws, but I only wish Apple would speak up once about human rights in the world and refuse to do business in regimes that are so brutal they would/could actually execute the CEO of Apple if he visited there because of his sexual orientation.


    Out of curiosity, are you LGBTQ+ ?
    I'm very happy that you can't tell. I'm glad that being a supporter of human rights doesn't mean I have to be or not be LGB. I think answering that question has nothing to do with my concerns, so I won't answer.
  • Reply 14 of 14
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 2,937member
    elijahg said:

    Saudi Arabia imprisons, tortures and executes people for being gay. And yet Apple chooses to reward Saudi Arabia with programs like this? Does Apple protest human rights anywhere? Oh yes, I forgot, Apple protests restrictions on which bathrooms LGBTQ people can use in Texas, but notice that Apple doesn't ever protest imprisonment of gays in other countries. I presume any protest would hurt Apple's sales. So Apple punishes Texas economically for a small crime, but rewards Saudi Arabia for a big crime?

    https://www.inc.com/salvador-rodriguez/tech-texas-bathroom-bill.html <--

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_rights_in_Saudi_Arabia#LGBT_rights <--

    To be fair, I think Apple has the legal right to refuse to do business in any state where Apple doesn't like the bathroom laws, but I only wish Apple would speak up once about human rights in the world and refuse to do business in regimes that are so brutal they would/could actually execute the CEO of Apple if he visited there because of his sexual orientation.

    Unfortunately is what happens when you have a CEO that is driven entirely by profit above all else. Progressive statements/actions that apply only to the locations where it won't affect Apple's profit means they're doing nothing more than virtue signalling. Statements aimed at supporting people where it'll make a real difference, i.e. calling out regimes for their backwards laws despite a potential hit to profit would have much more effect and also garner much more respect. 
    You’re quite confused and apparently ignorant about Apple’s executive history. Cook has famously been grilled for not pursuing “the bloody ROI” and engaging in efforts with no major pay off, like developing the most handicapped accessible OS on the market, or its green and recycling efforts, etc etc. Apple cannot change laws in a kingdom. The notion that SA represents some huge profit center is likely also untrue. 
    Exactly.  And well said.  Some people would have Apple wait until all human rights issues are resolved in a country (China, Saudi Arabia, et al) before engaging in business in that country.  As though Apple could, through disengagement, affect the needed changes.  As though Apple doing business in these countries is somehow condoning the human rights abuses.  

    A person capable of critical thinking might weigh two approaches.  

    A ) boycott any country that has any record of human rights abuses or worker safety issues or gender inequality or any number of other transgressions, until all such transgressions are satisfactorily resolved in the eyes of the larger world, or

    B ) recognize the reality that sovereign nations don’t all share the same ideals or apply the same values with respect to treatment of people, and that some that don’t share western ideals or values have their own ideals and values based deeply in their religious beliefs and cultural histories.  And further recognize that western values actually espouse freedom of, and respect for, the religious beliefs of others who don’t share your own.  In this context it might be better to engage with these nations and their societies in an effort to foster mutual respect and understanding and perhaps bring about change through deeper engagement and mutual goals.  

    Option B is the option Apple has chosen and that Tim Cook has on multiple occasions directly stated.  And if you think about the futility of changing deeply ingrained religious or cultural beliefs, attitudes and behaviors, you might well come to understand why Apple has chosen to engage rather than to directly oppose.  It just makes sense.  

    Considering the whole context with profit in mind, it further makes sense to engage rather than to oppose, as boycotting does little to change but will do much to open the door and hand the market to those with less scruples.  The Samsungs and others of the world will happily take over those markets.  This would weaken Apple.  I’d rather have piles of money pouring into the coffers of a company that gives a damn and has integrity, that can and does use some of those profits to effect positive change, than into the coffers of their competition.  

    Think different! 
    I'm very happy that you didn't delete my post or ban me for criticizing Apple over human rights.

    I think my post was mostly about putting pressure on Apple to be consistent in its application of its values. But some people think a double standard for democracies and dictatorships is okay. That's understandable and fair, but only as long as the double standard is acknowledged. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
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