This is the best tool to safely clean your AirPods or AirPods Pro

Posted:
in General Discussion edited May 9
Earwax is nasty. Compound that with dirt and debris, and AirPods can get filthy in a hurry. This tool makes it easier than ever to clean your AirPods, AirPods Pro, or other in-ear earbuds safely.

How to clean your AirPods
How to clean your AirPods


Earbuds, especially Apple's all-white AirPods, have a knack for getting dirty. Ear wax is constantly regenerated within your ear canals, so some always manage to get on the buds no matter how often you clean your ears.

Similarly, your ears have plenty of naturally occurring oils that get on your earbuds which will then attract other lint and debris. At the same time, the tight nooks and crannies make it difficult for typical cleaning tools to be effective.





To that end, many users have come up with their own solutions for keeping them clean, like canned air, cotton swabs, alcohol wipes, microfiber towels, or a combination of the four.

There is a better option.

A weird-looking tool

This odd-looking tool from Hagibis -- though there are similar brands -- was made to help deal with these common issues.

The microfiber end of the cleaning tool
The microfiber end of the cleaning tool


It's a two-sided device with three tools built-in. One side is a long microfiber pipe cleaner-like end. It's soft, and dirt clings to it, similar to a duster.

The pointy end of the cleaning tool
The precision end of the cleaning tool


The middle can then be pulled out and flipped to reveal the other pair of tools. One of the tools looks akin to a ballpoint pen - sans ink -- and the other is a small brush with soft -- yet stiff -- bristles.

Cleaning our earbuds

Cleaning inside the AirPods Pro case
Cleaning inside the AirPods Pro case


The microfiber pipe cleaner end is perfect if you need to clean your AirPods case. It's long enough to get into the deep charging holes on the inside of the case.

Cleaning around the silicone on AirPods Pro
Cleaning around the silicone on AirPods Pro


For the earbuds, we use the precision tools on the flip side. With AirPods Pro, we run the metal tip around the interior edge of the silicone ear tip to get anything off the sides. If the grille looks like it is dirty, you can use the metal tip to gently rub against the mesh to carefully dislodge any debris.

Use the brush on the delicate grille
Use the brush on the delicate grille


Finally, on any earbuds, including the third-generation AirPods, you can use the small brush to get any remaining dirt from the end of the earbud.

Grab your own cleaning tool

Not everyone needs a dedicated cleaning tool, but if you want to make sure your earbuds are as clean as possible, you can give this tool a try. Amazon has them available for around $9. However, they're currently on sale with a 5% off instant coupon.

In 2021, Apple introduced its own Apple polishing cloth. While roundly mocked for its $19 price tag, it immediately sold out -- and is good for cleaning screens.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 15
    I usually use twist ties to clean my lighting port of lint, so would think that it would not be too bad for airpods (I don't have any)......and twist ties are basically free (with bread, etc.).
    edited February 22
  • Reply 2 of 15
    thttht Posts: 4,388member
    I just use a cotton swab.

    My average for functioning workout headphones is still about 1 year. The 2nd pair of PowerBeats Pro is starting to have symptoms of failure. Maybe I move on to bone conduction next?
  • Reply 3 of 15
    Go to a hearing aid seller. They have specialized tool for cleaning hearing aids that does an excellent job.
    Anilu_777dewmeJaiOh81komei1980
  • Reply 4 of 15
    Go to a hearing aid seller. They have specialized tool for cleaning hearing aids that does an excellent job.
    Not only tools but a miniature vacuum cleaner. It’s perfect. 
    komei1980
  • Reply 5 of 15
    mike1mike1 Posts: 2,981member
    I usually use twist ties to clean my lighting port of lint, so would think that it would not be too bad for airpods (I don't have any)......and twist ties are basically free (with bread, etc.).

    Toothpicks work well also.
    zroger73
  • Reply 6 of 15
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,143member
    A dedicated tool :smiley: 

  • Reply 7 of 15
    Why not just wash them? Would the unattaching and attaching cause them to where out?
  • Reply 8 of 15
    Andrew_OSUAndrew_OSU Posts: 531member, editor
    Why not just wash them? Would the unattaching and attaching cause them to where out?
    That's totally ok to do, but wax and oil repel water so you'll still need to scrub or use a tool to get them fully clean. 
  • Reply 9 of 15
    Thanks for the video. As a professional in hearing aid industry I strongly recommend to not use any stiff or sharp instruments to clean your AirPods. You can damage the electronics and speakers accidentally and scratches in the plastic parts will be the perfect spot for germs and bacteria. As Anilu_777 said a mini vacuum cleaner is much better. I have seen one with a soft brush too and it is recommended to use a dryer without heat to dry the AIrPods over night. There are dryers that run with fan and have integrated UV-C light for disinfection. Removing moisture with a dryer and cleaning with a mini vacuum cleaner is the overall best solution any my opinion.
    appleinsideruser
  • Reply 10 of 15
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    I just scrap any debris off -- although I avoid touching the grills.

    I finally figured out my biggest problem though:  My Airpods repeatedly developed a problem where one would not only not charge but actually discharge while in the case.

    It turned out (I think) that it was sweat on the Airpod after a workout (mostly running) where the sweat would run down and corrode the terminal in the bottom of the case.   The case tested fine but the Airpod was not working right -- so Apple kept replacing the Airpod when the case was the problem.
    Now I wipe them off before returning them to the case.
    dewmecgWerks
  • Reply 11 of 15
    Blue tak is the answer. It can clean every part of your AirPods, that tools like this and cotton swabs don't stand a chance against.

    Blue tak can be pushed into the grills on the sides and pulled off to remove tons of wax build up. This is an essential AirPods and AirPods Pro cleaning tool. Nothing else even comes close.
    AppleishcgWerksmike1
  • Reply 12 of 15
    Prometheu said:
    Blue tak is the answer. It can clean every part of your AirPods, that tools like this and cotton swabs don't stand a chance against.

    Blue tak can be pushed into the grills on the sides and pulled off to remove tons of wax build up. This is an essential AirPods and AirPods Pro cleaning tool. Nothing else even comes close.
    Same. People recommended it not long after the first AirPods came out. I bought one pack of white colored Blu Tack and having using it ever since.
  • Reply 13 of 15
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,840member
    I just scrap any debris off -- although I avoid touching the grills.

    I finally figured out my biggest problem though:  My Airpods repeatedly developed a problem where one would not only not charge but actually discharge while in the case.

    It turned out (I think) that it was sweat on the Airpod after a workout (mostly running) where the sweat would run down and corrode the terminal in the bottom of the case.   The case tested fine but the Airpod was not working right -- so Apple kept replacing the Airpod when the case was the problem.
    Now I wipe them off before returning them to the case.
    I'll have to watch for that. I've been having uneven charging/discharge issues as well. But, it must be something like that, as it isn't 100% consistent. The other weird thing, is I can take them out, both 100% charged (or really close), and one might die quite some time before the other. That doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me. It isn't 100% consistent either, though I'd say it is one ear more often than the other (so many one battery is weaker... but it doesn't always do it).
    Buttwax
  • Reply 14 of 15
    cgWerks said:
    I just scrap any debris off -- although I avoid touching the grills.

    I finally figured out my biggest problem though:  My Airpods repeatedly developed a problem where one would not only not charge but actually discharge while in the case.

    It turned out (I think) that it was sweat on the Airpod after a workout (mostly running) where the sweat would run down and corrode the terminal in the bottom of the case.   The case tested fine but the Airpod was not working right -- so Apple kept replacing the Airpod when the case was the problem.
    Now I wipe them off before returning them to the case.
    I'll have to watch for that. I've been having uneven charging/discharge issues as well. But, it must be something like that, as it isn't 100% consistent. The other weird thing, is I can take them out, both 100% charged (or really close), and one might die quite some time before the other. That doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me. It isn't 100% consistent either, though I'd say it is one ear more often than the other (so many one battery is weaker... but it doesn't always do it).

    Good luck with that.   I know it can be irritating and frustrating.   Apple never did suggest that it was due to sweat & corrosion on the terminals -- but when I started wiping them before replacing them in the case the problem stopped happening.  I hope that works for you.
    cgWerks
  • Reply 15 of 15
    I use a Philips Sonicare  toothbrush anytime I feel transparency is not sounding clearly.  I use a new brush and gently press over areas were dirt gets lodged. The vibration dislodges all debris. They sound new when done.

Sign In or Register to comment.