iPhone & AirPods will require USB-C for charging in the EU by late 2024

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in iPhone
The European Union has agreed on new rules adopting USB-C as a common charger, which may force Apple into using the connector instead of Lightning on iPhones by late 2024.




Announced on Tuesday by the Internal Market and Consumer Protection Committee, a deal has been reached on the creation of a common charger.

The intention is to increase device connectivity by having only one main connector used for chargers, instead of multiple different standards. The concept will also reduce e-waste, as using the same connector means one charger could be used for multiple devices.

The provisional agreement on an amended Radio Equipment Directive establishes the single charging solution for certain electronic devices. As well as mobile phones and tablets, it also covers e-readers, earbuds, digital cameras, headphones and headsets, handheld videogame consoles, and portable speakers.

All of those hardware types would need to use USB Type-C for charging, regardless of the manufacturer. Furthermore, notebooks will also need to be adapted to be compliant 40 months after the rules come into force.

It would also require the unbundling of the sale of chargers from the sale of the device, which is what Apple is doing now. There is also a harmonization of fast-charging technology as part of the deal, to further allow for charger-device compatibility.

The European Parliament and Council will have to formally approve the agreement after the summer recess, before it is published in the EU Official Journal. After that, the rules will come into force 20 days later, with provisions starting to apply 24 months later again.

Devices already on the market before the date the rules are applied won't be affected by the changes.

European Union officials have been working on the plan for a number of years, and while the EU formally proposed new legislation in January 2022, it required further backing. Internal Market and Consumer Protection Committee MEPs voted 43 to 2 in favor of the proposals in April.

When micro-USB was required, Apple got around the requirement by including an adapter in every iPhone box. It appears that the adapter approach has been prohibited in the new requirement.

In preparation for any rule changes, Apple has reportedly started to test USB-C in iPhones and new dongles, though a USB-C iPhone isn't expected until 2023.

Read on AppleInsider
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 42
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,247member

    When micro-USB was required, Apple got around the requirement by including an adapter in every iPhone box.
    No they didn't.
    grandact73
  • Reply 2 of 42
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,486administrator
    crowley said:

    When micro-USB was required, Apple got around the requirement by including an adapter in every iPhone box.
    No they didn't.
    Yes, they did.

    30-pin to micro USB. It wasn't forever, though.
    dewmeAlex1Ndarkvaderwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 42
    xbitxbit Posts: 357member
    Mike Wuerthele said:

    Yes, they did.

    30-pin to micro USB. It wasn't forever, though.
    It was available to purchase but it was never included in the box.

    The EU's new rules are a win for Apple. They can move to USB-C (something I'm sure was already in the works) and have a scapegoat to blame when people inevitably complain. 
    edited June 7 DAalsethzeus423igorskygrandact73dewmeAlex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 42
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,247member
    crowley said:

    When micro-USB was required, Apple got around the requirement by including an adapter in every iPhone box.
    No they didn't.
    Yes, they did.

    30-pin to micro USB. It wasn't forever, though.
    Not in the box.  Never a requirement.  No they didn't.
    grandact73Alex1N
  • Reply 5 of 42
    jimh2jimh2 Posts: 428member
    By 2024 most phones will not have ports so the EU’s effect will be nil. 
    zeus423entropyswatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 42
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,486administrator
    xbit said:
    Mike Wuerthele said:

    Yes, they did.

    30-pin to micro USB. It wasn't forever, though.
    It was available to purchase but it was never included in the box.

    The EU's new rules are a win for Apple. They can move to USB-C (something I'm sure was already in the works) and have a scapegoat to blame when people inevitably complain. 
    I've got Apple documentation that says that they did, and that is my recollection based on briefs that I gave way back then, but it was a long time ago.

    I'll look into further it a bit later in the day.
    Alex1Ndarkvaderwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 42
    KBuffettKBuffett Posts: 85member
    Does anyone get the thinking behind the design of Microsoft Surface charging connectors? Very strange design 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 42
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,247member
    KBuffett said:
    Does anyone get the thinking behind the design of Microsoft Surface charging connectors? Very strange design 
    The Surface Connect port?  It's zero-insertion force magnetic and handles high bandwidth data as well as power delivery.  I don't know of any other common port that does all of those, so assume the slightly odd design is to facilitate that.  A shame it's proprietary, but it's pretty neat, probably the best thing about the Surface.
  • Reply 9 of 42
    KBuffettKBuffett Posts: 85member
    crowley said:
    KBuffett said:
    Does anyone get the thinking behind the design of Microsoft Surface charging connectors? Very strange design 
    The Surface Connect port?  It's zero-insertion force magnetic and handles high bandwidth data as well as power delivery.  I don't know of any other common port that does all of those, so assume the slightly odd design is to facilitate that.  A shame it's proprietary, but it's pretty neat, probably the best thing about the Surface.
    Yes, that’s the one. If I recall correctly, the charger only has four pins, surely that’s achievable with a far more compact design.
    It’s probably around 2cm long, it seems like a bad design to me (performance excluded)
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 42
    mfrydmfryd Posts: 150member
    If you read the actual EU rule, it only applies to phones that use wired charging.  Phones without wired charging are exempt.

    Apple's current iPhone 13 can meet the new spec with a software update.  All Apple has to do is to disable charging via the lightning port.  If the lighting port is only for communication, and not for charging, it doesn't have to be USB-C.   That leaves only wireless charging for EU market iPhones.

    When it comes to the law, one should be wary of relying on media summaries as to what the rules actually say.



    cornchipfred1llamaAlex1Nentropysapplguywatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 11 of 42
    gordoncygordoncy Posts: 22member
    The beauty of these regulations is that
    they make future innovations like Magsav (like those on Macs, a wired connector)
    illegal.
    cornchipzeus423
  • Reply 12 of 42
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,247member
    gordoncy said:
    The beauty of these regulations is that
    they make future innovations like Magsav (like those on Macs, a wired connector)
    illegal.
    No they don't.
    llamadarkvader
  • Reply 13 of 42
    mike1mike1 Posts: 2,999member
    crowley said:
    KBuffett said:
    Does anyone get the thinking behind the design of Microsoft Surface charging connectors? Very strange design 
    The Surface Connect port?  It's zero-insertion force magnetic and handles high bandwidth data as well as power delivery.  I don't know of any other common port that does all of those, so assume the slightly odd design is to facilitate that.  A shame it's proprietary, but it's pretty neat, probably the best thing about the Surface.
    So wait, somebody has already developed a connector/port/interface that might be better than USB C but will not be able to sell it in Europe soon?

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 42
    kaiserxkaiserx Posts: 4member
    Apple should go with the USB-C to iPhone, but then make the connector to the puck proprietary 😝
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 42
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,247member
    mike1 said:
    crowley said:
    KBuffett said:
    Does anyone get the thinking behind the design of Microsoft Surface charging connectors? Very strange design 
    The Surface Connect port?  It's zero-insertion force magnetic and handles high bandwidth data as well as power delivery.  I don't know of any other common port that does all of those, so assume the slightly odd design is to facilitate that.  A shame it's proprietary, but it's pretty neat, probably the best thing about the Surface.
    So wait, somebody has already developed a connector/port/interface that might be better than USB C but will not be able to sell it in Europe soon?
    The Surface is not a phone, and it can charge using USB-C anyway.
    darkvader
  • Reply 16 of 42
    ITGUYINSDITGUYINSD Posts: 390member
    This is good in that it will accelerate the development of even better (i.e., faster and more power) USB-C chargers and cables.  As it is now, PD charging standard goes to 100W.  Some more powerful laptops need 130W or even 230W and require a proprietary USB-C charger as the PD standard does not go that high.

    This might spur the ratification of better PD charging limits and over time, prices will come down as supply increases.

    I see it as a win-win.
    edited June 7 darkvader
  • Reply 17 of 42
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,247member
    ITGUYINSD said:
    This is good in that it will accelerate the development of even better (i.e., faster and more power) USB-C chargers and cables.  As it is now, PD charging standard goes to 100W.  Some more powerful laptops need 130W or even 230W and require a proprietary USB-C charger as the PD standard does not go that high.

    This might spur the ratification of better PD charging limits and over time, prices will come down as supply increases.

    I see it as a win-win.
    USB4 supports up to 240W.
    caladanianAlex1Ndarkvaderwatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 42
    DangDaveDangDave Posts: 87member
    I have attached the June 2020 fact sheet for the EU announcement. 

    Apple has been part of the USB-IF since it was formed and I presume it hasn’t always gotten its way, but it will adapt. Other OEMs are going to have to make bigger changes such as adding USB PD along with or in place of QC to their devices sold in the EU. 

    The bottom line is that it’s win win for all of us. 
    muthuk_vanalingamAlex1N
  • Reply 19 of 42
    zeus423zeus423 Posts: 156member
    I honestly don't care what kind of cable is included as long as it works.
    igorskyJaphey
  • Reply 20 of 42
    xbitxbit Posts: 357member
    I've got Apple documentation that says that they did, and that is my recollection based on briefs that I gave way back then, but it was a long time ago.
    I live in the UK and have owned every generation of iPhone since the 3GS. Like the rest of the world, a 3.5mm adapter has sometimes been bundled but never a microUSB adapter. 
    applguyappleinsideruser
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