Hands on: Everything new with CarPlay in iOS 16

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in iOS
Apple heavily featured CarPlay during this year's WWDC keynote. There are several changes planned -- some imminent and some for down the line. Here is what's new with CarPlay and what we'll actually see in iOS 16.

Updated CarPlay UI
Updated CarPlay UI


Thus far, Apple has only issued an initial developer beta of iOS 16. Therefore, some features may change by the final release and some functionality may be added.

Take Maps for example. Apple touted a big update that will allow multi-stop routes. You could plan a trip from your home, to a gas station, to a friend's house, to a coffee shop, to a final destination.

These routes can be created on your Mac with macOS Ventura before being sent to your iPhone. In this first beta, CarPlay doesn't support turn-by-turn directions for these routes. Hopefully, this is included with the full release in the fall of 2022.



Improvements to existing apps

With iOS 16, Apple has made improvements to existing CarPlay apps. With Messages, Siri is now able to automatically send a message after it's been read back to you.

With iOS 15, Siri would need affirmative confirmation before sending a message, which can slow down the process. As long as the message is correct, it will send it on its way without your intervention. If the message needs to be altered, a "change" button is still visible on the CarPlay interface.

Updated Podcast library in iOS 16 CarPlay
Updated Podcast library in iOS 16 CarPlay


The Podcasts app is also getting a big revamp with iOS 16. It was extremely limited before, unable to surface recent episodes. Apple has added a new library with this update allowing you to find saved episodes more easily as well as the latest episodes from any show you follow.

New app categories

Occasionally, Apple adds new categories of supported apps for CarPlay. Typically, CarPlay apps will be navigation or audio apps with only a limited number of other categories available to show in the interface. The iOS 16 update supports two new types of apps.

Both fueling and driving tasks are compatible with iOS 16, though you'll have to wait for developers to deliver this as an update later this year. Fuelling apps are self-explanatory and include any that may help you find fueling stations or lower gas prices.

Driving task apps are a bit broader. Any apps that help with tasks while in the vehicle could be included, such as those that provide toll rates/routes, road information, or towing assistance.

An all-new CarPlay experience

Most users are excited about the all-new CarPlay experience that Apple previewed during the event. Unfortunately, this is not coming soon.

The future of CarPlay
The future of CarPlay


Starting with vehicles that are being announced in late 2023, CarPlay will exist on all your car's screens. It's currently limited to your primary center console display and navigation guidance in the middle of your instrument cluster. The CarPlay of the future will fully take over all displays, including additional dash displays.

CarPlay in the instrument cluster
CarPlay in the instrument cluster


The instrument cluster is full of customization with plenty of fonts, themes, colors, and layouts to choose from. All while retaining the requisite information like the speed, range, fuel levels, RPMs, and more. This is a level of customization we don't often see from Apple.

CarPlay widgets
CarPlay widgets


Large displays or wide displays will be home to widgets. Apple has default widgets for your calendar, weather, audio playback, time, trip info, and Home controls. This, too, is customizable.

We're most excited about the ability to control your vehicle's systems directly from the CarPlay interface. No longer will you need to leave CarPlay to adjust your car's AC, heat the steering wheel, turn on your seat vents, or tune the radio.

This is a huge departure and is what is most likely to give automakers pause. By ceding the entirety of the vehicle to CarPlay, they don't get to highlight their systems.

CarPlay in iOS 16


Apple says vehicles will be announced in late 2023, meaning we won't see this in the wild until 2024. At WWDC, Apple announced commitments from several major manufacturers to adopt this updated version of CarPlay.

Ford, Acura, Honda, Volvo, Land Rover, Nissan, and others were included in this list. That said, how many vehicles and to what degree of support remains to be seen.

Coming soon

At the moment, iOS 16 is currently in developer beta. A public beta is scheduled to be released in July before a full release this fall. Stay tuned to AppleInsider as we walk through more features for Apple's upcoming software updates.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 19
    gregoriusmgregoriusm Posts: 493member
     RPMs”

    Aaaaah!!!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 19
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,679member

    This is a huge departure and is what is most likely to give automakers pause. By ceding the entirety of the vehicle to CarPlay, they don't get to highlight their systems.

    It’s not the inability to ‘highlight their systems’ that will give the carmakers pause. How many carmakers view their heater controls as a source of pride or brand identity? What will give them pause is the fact that instead of being a simple extension of the display CarPlay will now be able to directly control some of the cars systems. That’s a huge change both in terms of functionality and in terms of access and security. 
    StrangeDaysravnorodomwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 19
    CheeseFreezeCheeseFreeze Posts: 1,041member
    MplsP said:

    This is a huge departure and is what is most likely to give automakers pause. By ceding the entirety of the vehicle to CarPlay, they don't get to highlight their systems.

    It’s not the inability to ‘highlight their systems’ that will give the carmakers pause. How many carmakers view their heater controls as a source of pride or brand identity? What will give them pause is the fact that instead of being a simple extension of the display CarPlay will now be able to directly control some of the cars systems. That’s a huge change both in terms of functionality and in terms of access and security. 
    Many carmakers do. And in fact, as a consumer, one of the main things I look at when buying a new car is dashboard ergonomics, usability and functionality.
    Unlike the old days, all cars look alike. All the parts are made in the same type of factory. 
    The same car shapes, the same boring colors. They all have become uniform, dull, set aside the occasional exception. Each brand has the same set of user segments they sell to. They compete but whatever you choose, within any given price range, you’ll be fine. 
    Left to differentiate with is the ‘inside’ of the car. Until that gets taken over by a tech company like Apple, who are much better at it vs car companies who design looking back 10-years.   
    lolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 19
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 2,774member
    One thing I always wanted in MAP App is easy creation of multi-stop customized(drag around) route on your desktop map and send it to phone. The phone/carplay map should follow that exact route.
    Article says Apple is updating routes can be created on your Mac with macOS Ventura before being sent to your iPhone. Question is people using Windows and iPhone, how will it work for them ?
    Another important iPhone Map function needed is ability to drag route to create your own customized route like we can do on desktop version of Map.

    edited June 11
  • Reply 5 of 19
    entropysentropys Posts: 3,594member
    I would hope you could do it in a browser for windows machines.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 19
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,195member
    MplsP said:

    This is a huge departure and is what is most likely to give automakers pause. By ceding the entirety of the vehicle to CarPlay, they don't get to highlight their systems.
    It’s not the inability to ‘highlight their systems’ that will give the carmakers pause. How many carmakers view their heater controls as a source of pride or brand identity? What will give them pause is the fact that instead of being a simple extension of the display CarPlay will now be able to directly control some of the cars systems. That’s a huge change both in terms of functionality and in terms of access and security. 
    Many carmakers do. And in fact, as a consumer, one of the main things I look at when buying a new car is dashboard ergonomics, usability and functionality.
    Unlike the old days, all cars look alike. All the parts are made in the same type of factory. 
    The same car shapes, the same boring colors. They all have become uniform, dull, set aside the occasional exception. Each brand has the same set of user segments they sell to. They compete but whatever you choose, within any given price range, you’ll be fine. 
    Left to differentiate with is the ‘inside’ of the car. Until that gets taken over by a tech company like Apple, who are much better at it vs car companies who design looking back 10-years.   
    No, the reason cars look similar is due to streamlining for fuel efficiency - random shapes & fins don’t work as well as shapes with less drag. Which still doesn’t mean they all look exactly the same, of course. A Porsche, Subaru, Ford, all have their own look. 
    beowulfschmidtwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 19
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,195member
    entropys said:
    I would hope you could do it in a browser for windows machines.
    I would be willing to bet my phone they are not going to develop a web tool for Windows users to plan multi-stop routes to send to their iPhone. I believe you’ll be able to plan stops just fine from the device itself; the sending from a desktop Mac is just a value-add for those in the walled garden. 
    rob53lolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 19
    rob53rob53 Posts: 3,006member
    MplsP said:

    This is a huge departure and is what is most likely to give automakers pause. By ceding the entirety of the vehicle to CarPlay, they don't get to highlight their systems.

    It’s not the inability to ‘highlight their systems’ that will give the carmakers pause. How many carmakers view their heater controls as a source of pride or brand identity? What will give them pause is the fact that instead of being a simple extension of the display CarPlay will now be able to directly control some of the cars systems. That’s a huge change both in terms of functionality and in terms of access and security. 
    How many cars, other than Tesla, use electronically/computer controlled car functions (like heater controls) instead of mechanical/electronic controls? Yes, you can press a button on your dash to turn on your heater but how much of that is controlled by the car's computer? The ODB port allows a lot of diagnostic access, including engine speed, RPM, calculated MPG (if you set the fuel tank size properly), along with TPMS values and a host of other, primarily, engine-related status features. I can display some of these on my Alpine deck so CarPlay should be able to access those if the car manufacturer allows access to them with their manufacturer-unique CarPlay interface (in other words, access to the ODB port. I presume Apple wants more than just simple ODB access, like on my Alpine deck, but I don't believe Apple is attempting to provide an entire vehicle operational connection. Of course, most non-EVs don't have many things to really control. CarPlay already extends the car's features, providing better access to music and car directions than the garbage most car manufacturers put into their current systems. I'm already paying for cellular data, I really don't want to also have to pay for a car cellular data plan. The only good way CarPlay can be integrated into new vehicles is for the manufacturer to make a major change in how everything electronic works in their car while also trying to get the manufacturer to get rid of the majority of their push buttons and dials. That said, my Alpine iLX107 continues to drop connection with my iPhone and the only way to get it back is to stop my truck, turn if off to turn all power to the Alpine deck off, then turn my truck back on. Sooner or later, I'm going to add another pushbutton to my truck to intercept the power going to the Alpine deck so I don't have to stop. My connection is via WiFi and I've seen it drop while going past the same location, making me wonder if there's a business or the police blocking all WiFi signals. This "feature" of my Alpine deck using CarPlay worries my greatly about using an external device or even a combination internal and external device to operate my truck. Tesla controls everything so nothing is left to an external device. Unless the new CarPlay is an embedded device that doesn't actually require an iOS device to function, I don't see it passing NHTSA regulations. If we read the fine print, the new version of CarPlay isn't going to be ready for at least a few years.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 19
    linguistlinguist Posts: 11member
    I'm amazed at the amount of hype for the supposedly new and revolutionary features that may be coming to CarPlay in the future. My new Volvo XC40 Recharge EV already has most of this, running on the Android Automotive Operating System (not quite the same as Android Auto): voice control of climate controls, navigation system, seat position, some driving functions ("Hey Google! Turn on one pedal drive!"), infotainment system, reading text messages on my iPhone, etc. The possibility of setting up a route in Google Maps on my desktop and transferring it to the car is promised for a future version of Volvo Cars (their iOS app). Since I prefer Google Maps to Apple Maps (and accessed via Google Assistant in the car, it's really very smart), that's quite enough in that area.

    I will yield to no one in my long time enthusiasm for Apple's ecosystem, but I don't see the future functionality of CarPlay as something I need to hold my breath for. I was sorry Volvo didn't have CarPlay when I bought the car --- the current version is supposed to arrive via an automatic over-the-air update by the end of this month (it was scheduled earlier, but pulled for engineers to fix some bugs in their implementation). But now I don't really see a lot to look forward to there, apart from a couple of apps that (I think) work in CarPlay but haven't yet been ported to AAOS. Apple's new stuff may well be very nice, when it (together with cars that run it) finally arrives, but it will be largely a matter of catching up, and I'm not holding my breath.
  • Reply 10 of 19
    tmonlinetmonline Posts: 10member
    Retrofitting Car play in existing space 8inches or less will not work for a touch screens. Utter loss of usability. For an iPad environment, again that is a must for a good experience, a good size touch screen is required. 

    Trying to retrofit with all the buttons for everything is just adding clutter.

    Possible automakers trying to compete with Tesla and apple making good usable software for them. Something has to give. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 19
    welshdogwelshdog Posts: 1,833member
    MplsP said:

    This is a huge departure and is what is most likely to give automakers pause. By ceding the entirety of the vehicle to CarPlay, they don't get to highlight their systems.

    It’s not the inability to ‘highlight their systems’ that will give the carmakers pause. How many carmakers view their heater controls as a source of pride or brand identity? What will give them pause is the fact that instead of being a simple extension of the display CarPlay will now be able to directly control some of the cars systems. That’s a huge change both in terms of functionality and in terms of access and security. 

    It could be an issue for some carmakers, but others will see it as a way to co-brand with Apple. They'll promote the CarPlay features in their marketing as a way to entice a subset of potential car buyers. it certainly would be somewhat of an enticement for me, just as cars with Android Auto are a negative. My wife and I have an interest the new Volvo C40 Recharge models. I learned they run on the Android Auto and that annoys me. The car does list Carplay compatibility as a feature, but I figure it is limited within the overall Android OS of the car. Perhaps a couple years from now Volvo (and others) will offer full Android Auto or full expanded CarPlay as an option when you buy.
    lolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 19
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 2,774member
    Apple's next generation of CarPlay is coming in late 2023 —  which cars will support the update -
    Acura,Audi,Ford,Honda,Infiniti,Jaguar,Land Rover,Lincoln,Mercedes,Nissan,Polestar (new addition),Porsche,Renault,Volvo.

    Toyota,Hyundai,etc not on list. Is Toyota again going to drag it's feet to support next gen CarPlay ? Toyota/Lexus was the last to support CarPlay and only happened because millions of Toyota customers complained and went to Honda and others to buy there next new car with CarPlay..

    edited June 11 lolliver
  • Reply 13 of 19
    eriamjheriamjh Posts: 1,385member
    CarPlay features are likely coming out of the delayed Apple Car program.   

    It exists, but it’s hitting many speed bumps.  
    imgmkrwelshdogwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 19
    imgmkrimgmkr Posts: 16member
    lately some auto-makers' display/dash designs are looking better than Car Play screen. 
    my '21 Kia Sorrento's infotainment display is par with looking feel of CP. I rarely use CP these days.
    Apple needs to step up their's and some, eh!
     
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 19
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 2,774member
    imgmkr said:
    lately some auto-makers' display/dash designs are looking better than Car Play screen. 
    my '21 Kia Sorrento's infotainment display is par with looking feel of CP. I rarely use CP these days.
    Apple needs to step up their's and some, eh!
     

    The problem with car manufacturer's own dash/infotainment system once in place; never get updated. On contrary, Apple Play(or android) on your phone can be updated constantly giving you more features for years in future after the car is bought. MAP/Navigation in vehicle is one good example where auto manufacturers miserably failed to keep updating installed navigation system so unfortunately people paid for but never used it because always lacking updates. Instead people start using CarPlay and it was blessing,
    StrangeDayslolliverbeowulfschmidt
  • Reply 16 of 19
    linguistlinguist Posts: 11member
    welshdog said:
    It could be an issue for some carmakers, but others will see it as a way to co-brand with Apple. They'll promote the CarPlay features in their marketing as a way to entice a subset of potential car buyers. it certainly would be somewhat of an enticement for me, just as cars with Android Auto are a negative. My wife and I have an interest the new Volvo C40 Recharge models. I learned they run on the Android Auto and that annoys me. The car does list Carplay compatibility as a feature, but I figure it is limited within the overall Android OS of the car. Perhaps a couple years from now Volvo (and others) will offer full Android Auto or full expanded CarPlay as an option when you buy.
    In considering the Volvo XC40 Recharge EV, I was also unhappy about the Android aspect, and looking forward to the promised CarPlay. CarPlay hasn't materialized yet, though there's good reason to expect the current version soon, but I'm surprised at how well the Android system works in the car. Remember, this is a car, not a desktop ... the things you want the system to do in a car are quite well covered. There are a few apps I wish I had (I'd like Audible, and some are surprised that there's no Waze for Android Automative Operating System), but no big problem (I can run Audible on my iPhone and listen on the car's audio system via bluetooth). There are some problems, but these tend to be matters of connectivity or a need to restart things, stuff that I can assure you Apple will face to the same extent when they get their corresponding system up. I would urge you to test drive the Volvo and see how it works. 
    welshdog
  • Reply 17 of 19
    tundraboytundraboy Posts: 1,836member
    Some dashboard meters/displays are considered to be safety-critical items by the DOT.  At least that was the case a few years ago when BMW had to fix the dash readout on my car for free because the DOT deemed it showed safety-critical info and thus was required to have a longer warranty coverage.

    If CarPlay takes over the dash display, I wonder who takes on that liability, Apple or the car company?  Who pays if a dashboard malfunction leads to an accident? 
    welshdog
  • Reply 18 of 19
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,195member
    imgmkr said:
    lately some auto-makers' display/dash designs are looking better than Car Play screen. 
    my '21 Kia Sorrento's infotainment display is par with looking feel of CP. I rarely use CP these days.
    Apple needs to step up their's and some, eh!
    Is it better than the ‘19 Kia Sorento? Cuz that ain’t special.
    lolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 19
    pjmpjm Posts: 1member
    I’d like to see maps and weather integrated so that you could see weather along a route or storms coming in ahead. Ideally, you might be able to avoid bad weather by changing your departure time, just like you can adjust for traffic.  
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