Apple 35W Dual USB-C power adapters available to order

Posted:
in General Discussion
There are two new 35W Dual USB-C power adapters made by Apple and they are both available to purchase for $59 on Apple's website.

Apple's two 35W dual USB-C power adapters
Apple's two 35W dual USB-C power adapters


When Apple announced the M2 MacBook Air during WWDC it also revealed two new power adapters. There is a compact adapter and a standard adapter that both have two USB-C ports and output 35W.

The compact power adapter is exactly what the name implies -- compact. It offers the same 35W dual USB-C setup as the other adapter, except it uses an integrated, folded AC prong.

The standard power adapter uses Apple's more traditional adapter design with two USB-C ports facing away from the AC prongs. The prongs are also exchangeable with other regional adapters found in Apple's World Travel Adapter Kit.

Customers can order either power adapter on Friday and expect delivery by June 22 with standard shipping. They are both $59 and ship without a cable.

The updated 13-inch MacBook Pro with M2 is also available for pre-order on Apple's website. Initial shipments are expected on June 24.

Where to buy

  • Buy the 35W Dual USB-C Port Compact Power Adapter for $59.
  • Buy the 35W Dual USB-C Port Power Adapter for $59.
  • Buy the World Travel Adapter Kit for $29
Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 8
    Does anyone know if these chargers are GaN?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 8
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 3,212member
    The specs for these chargers on Apple's website state only "USB C"--what a joke. Does anyone know their weight? Anker has a dual USB C 40w charger (not foldable pins, in multiple colors) weighing 3 ounces for under $31 on amazon.
    edited June 2022 watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 8
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 3,212member
    tomstraus said:
    Does anyone know if these chargers are GaN?
    Almost certainly
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 8
    DangDaveDangDave Posts: 98member
    These Apple charging adapters are USB-C PD (Power Delivery). PD is the standard from the USB-IF and is what EU is mandating in their new regulations for fast charging or for charging above 15 watts. All Apple devices that include fast charging or require more than 15 watts have PD.

    Many Anker and other charging adaptors do not have PD, instead they have what they call IQ which means that the voltage will not change and therefore they are limited to 5 volts and therefore 15 watts. So yes, 15 watts is better and faster than 5, 10, or 12 watts, but this is not considered fast charging. 

    What we don’t know is how the two ports share the 35 watts when two connectors are attached? Probably port 1 max 20w, port 2 max 15w?
    dewmeStrangeDaysJapheywatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 8
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 3,212member
    DangDave said:
    Many Anker and other charging adaptors do not have PD, instead they have what they call IQ which means that the voltage will not change and therefore they are limited to 5 volts and therefore 15 watts. So yes, 15 watts is better and faster than 5, 10, or 12 watts, but this is not considered fast charging. 
    I realize you wrote "many" Anker chargers, not all. The Anker charger I referred to (model 512 Nano Pro) supports what the company calls PowerIQ 3.0, which supports power delivery at up to 100 watts but can not be advertised or certified as "PD" because USB-IF doesn't allow any other standard in combination with PD over USB C. The charger does change voltage as needed and I've even used their 1.7 ounce 30W Nano II GaN charger to charge 16" MacBook Pros at a good clip (importantly only while the computers sleep!). This tiny charger is far more convenient to carry than lugging Apple's power bricks.
    StrangeDaysJaphey
  • Reply 6 of 8
    DangDaveDangDave Posts: 98member
    cpsro said:
    DangDave said:
    Many Anker and other charging adaptors do not have PD, instead they have what they call IQ which means that the voltage will not change and therefore they are limited to 5 volts and therefore 15 watts. So yes, 15 watts is better and faster than 5, 10, or 12 watts, but this is not considered fast charging. 
    I realize you wrote "many" Anker chargers, not all. The Anker charger I referred to (model 512 Nano Pro) supports what the company calls PowerIQ 3.0, which supports power delivery at up to 100 watts but can not be advertised or certified as "PD" because USB-IF doesn't allow any other standard in combination with PD over USB C. The charger does change voltage as needed and I've even used their 1.7 ounce 30W Nano II GaN charger to charge 16" MacBook Pros at a good clip (importantly only while the computers sleep!). This tiny charger is far more convenient to carry than lugging Apple's power bricks.
    Thanks! Yes, I just found the following information, so IQ3 is probably okay. 

    What is PowerIQ and PD? 

    USB Power Delivery (USB PD) is an open fast charging standard. Developed and maintained by the same group that supports USB-C. Anker’s PowerIQ 3.0 is a proprietary fast charging standard that combines USB PD and PowerIQ 2.0 into a single USB-C port  
    StrangeDaysJapheywatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 8
    DangDaveDangDave Posts: 98member
    How to use the Apple 35W Dual Power Adapter 

    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT213263

  • Reply 8 of 8
    The two USB C Ports split the available power between themselves. According to the Apple product documentation - 

    How to use the 35W Dual USB-C Port Power Adapter

    Charge two devices

    To charge two devices, connect your devices to either port on your power adapter. When you connect two devices, power is automatically distributed between them based on their power requirements. For most devices, power is shared evenly when you have two devices charging at the same time. For example:

    • If you connect a Mac notebook and an iPhone or iPad, each device receives up to 17.5W.
    • If you connect an iPhone and an iPad, each device receives up to 17.5W.
    • If you connect a Mac notebook or iPhone and an Apple Watch or AirPods, the Mac notebook or iPhone receives up to 27.5W and the Apple Watch or AirPods receive up to 7.5W.

    If either device needs more power, unplug the other device and its charging cable from your power adapter.

    watto_cobra
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