California passes bill that requires online 'guardrails' to protect children

Posted:
in General Discussion edited August 30
A children's online safety bill has been passed in California, which, if it becomes law, would see App Store apps obligated to include safety features for younger users.




As the Australian government demands details about child safety, and as Apple's proposed safeguards look to become inevitable, California has been debating a new bill.

According to the New York Times, Californian lawmakers have passed the first statute in the US to install so-called "guardrails" for users under 18. The California Age-Appropriate Design Code Act was passed by 33 votes to 0.

"The digital ecosystem is not safe by default for children," said Democrat Buffy Wicks, co-sponsor with Republican Jordan Cunningham. "We think the Kids' Code, as we call it, would make tech safer for children by essentially requiring these companies to better protect them."

Unlike the previous Children's Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998, the new bill is not just directed at services intended for children. Instead, it covers sites and apps that are "likely to be accessed" by people under the age of 18.

"Children should be afforded protections not only by online products and services specifically directed at them," says the statute, "but by all online products and services they are likely to access."

The new bill has already been approved by the State Assembly. It must now be approved by Governor Gavin Newsom and if it is, it will become effective in 2024.

Read on AppleInsider
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 26
    byronlbyronl Posts: 252member
    at the same time with australia…
    9secondkox2
  • Reply 2 of 26
    byronl said:
    at the same time with australia…
    How’s it working out? Does it make them less or more curious? (Serious question). 
  • Reply 3 of 26
    danoxdanox Posts: 1,334member
    Do parents bear any responsibility in all this?
    12StrangersJaiOh81byronlwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 26
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 816member
    How does a phone know the age of its user? 

    Is that addressed in the bill? Mandatory biometric registration through a government database perhaps?
    edited August 30 JaiOh81byronlwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 26
    entropysentropys Posts: 3,706member
    JFC: You put your birthday in your appleID. We set up our kids accounts so they can’t install an app without our permission, including IAP, movies and books etc. and family sharing.  Their complaints met with little sympathy.

    But that is us, and this kind of a bill offends me.
    i reckon eventually there will have to be a reckoning with the constant extension and intrusion of the nanny state in our lives. And it will be ugly.
    edited August 30 JaiOh819secondkox2uraharabyronlFileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 26
    jdwjdw Posts: 1,123member
    "Child safety"?  Who in their right mind would oppose that?  

    Well, I'm a parent originally from California.  "Nanny state" is an understatement.  My eldest is now in college and youngest is a Junior in high school.  They have been safe, secure and doing just fine in their online lives; and yes, I am a parent who cares about his kids.  The internet isn't perfectly safe, but it's much safer than traveling through the Tenderloin in San Francisco.

    Every new law crafted by the human mind comes with incredible reasons and great intentions for its existence, but it's all ultimately done to add more bureaucracy, more red tape, higher taxes, new penalties, and less freedom for everyone. There are so many rules, regulations and laws on the books today that nobody can comply with them all perfectly all the time.  The sheer abundance of rules have made everyone, including you who are now reading my post, into a law-breaker.  (Ever driven 41 in a 40 zone, even briefly?  You're a law-breaker!)

    There's more risk to having less rules, but greater individual liberty is worth it in the end.  A freer world really is a better world, despite some chaos. I say this as a typical American who understands the value of individual liberty, not as an anarchist.  
    edited August 30 entropys9secondkox2baconstangmuthuk_vanalingamuraharawatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 26
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 816member
    entropys said:
    JFC: You put your birthday in your appleID. 
    Though is that date entry verified somehow?
    edited August 30 9secondkox2
  • Reply 8 of 26
    JFC_PA said:
    entropys said:
    JFC: You put your birthday in your appleID. 
    Though is that date entry verified somehow?
    No. 
    JFC_PA
  • Reply 9 of 26
    JFC_PA said:
    entropys said:
    JFC: You put your birthday in your appleID. 
    Though is that date entry verified somehow?
    That’s a parent’s responsibility not apples or Californias 
    9secondkox2entropysbyronlOctoMonkeywatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 26
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 816member
    JFC_PA said:
    entropys said:
    JFC: You put your birthday in your appleID. 
    Though is that date entry verified somehow?
    No. 
    Still I suppose with it there then odds are it’d offer a check. 

    Overall the exploitation of such legislative mandates offers a lot of abuse potential in the current climate. Reproductive services? LGBGTQ information? 
  • Reply 11 of 26
    I’d like to think this is a commerce clause violation.
    DAalseth
  • Reply 12 of 26
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 816member
    JaiOh81 said:
    JFC_PA said:
    entropys said:
    JFC: You put your birthday in your appleID. 
    Though is that date entry verified somehow?
    That’s a parent’s responsibility not apples or Californias 
    Hence my point. Huge loophole. 
  • Reply 13 of 26
    byronl said:
    at the same time with australia…
    Not a coincidence.
    byronlentropys
  • Reply 14 of 26
    JFC_PA said:
    How does a phone know the age of its user? 

    Is that addressed in the bill? Mandatory biometric registration through a government database perhaps?
    Wouldn't be surprised for that to come down the pike. 

    [insert seeming good reason here] for {insert power grabbing, freedom killing, totalitarian regime benefit here]

    People should definitely not roll over for this. The California governor is making dictator decisions lately (no voter input whatsoever. Just decrees) and he wants to run for president. 

    Protecting children is good. Perhaps what we need to do is honor parents in our culture, not having the FBI treat them like terrorists when they want to protect their children from child endangering philosophies and materials in schools. Give parents MORE power, without taking away their freedoms in the process. 

    Apple has parental controls. Perhaps they need to periodically promote and advertise and tutor. 
    edited August 30 entropys
  • Reply 15 of 26
    personperson Posts: 26member
    I told you so… The recent “child protection” measures implemented by Apple only serve as a entry to more and more draconian government snooping, and data harvesting. The article claiming the government cant force Apple to violate its privacy policies is so misguided. They will never stop, especially creeps like newsom. They will always shout “it’s to protect the children” It’s their favorite excuse to execute control over every aspect of your life, and to take your freedoms away. This data collected will be used against you in politically motivated ways, and to keep the elites rich and pampered while the rest are oppressed. It will also be used to push in the new world order, tracking your so called carbon footprint and punishing you if you accidentally cross some arbitrary line. It’s so obvious. If you want to protect your children don’t let them use devices unsupervised. Simple. However they are clever and you should monitor your network for extra devices they may have hidden.
    entropysjdw
  • Reply 16 of 26
    uraharaurahara Posts: 674member
    person said:
    I told you so… The recent “child protection” measures implemented by Apple only serve as an entry to more and more draconian government snooping, and data harvesting. The article claiming the government cant force Apple to violate its privacy policies is so misguided. They will never stop, especially creeps like newsom. They will always shout “it’s to protect the children” It’s their favorite excuse to execute control over every aspect of your life, and to take your freedoms away. This data collected will be used against you in politically motivated ways, and to keep the elites rich and pampered while the rest are oppressed. It will also be used to push in the new world order, tracking your so called carbon footprint and punishing you if you accidentally cross some arbitrary line. It’s so obvious. If you want to protect your children don’t let them use devices unsupervised. Simple. However they are clever and you should monitor your network for extra devices they may have hidden.
    What’s about free network from the neighbour? 
    FileMakerFeller
  • Reply 17 of 26
    entropys said:
    JFC: You put your birthday in your appleID. We set up our kids accounts so they can’t install an app without our permission, including IAP, movies and books etc. and family sharing.  Their complaints met with little sympathy.

    But that is us, and this kind of a bill offends me.
    i reckon eventually there will have to be a reckoning with the constant extension and intrusion of the nanny state in our lives. And it will be ugly.
    I expect, and fear, that reckoning will be quite...  revolutionary.
    FileMakerFeller
  • Reply 18 of 26
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,165member
    person said:
    I told you so… The recent “child protection” measures implemented by Apple only serve as a entry to more and more draconian government snooping, and data harvesting. The article claiming the government cant force Apple to violate its privacy policies is so misguided. They will never stop, especially creeps like newsom. They will always shout “it’s to protect the children” It’s their favorite excuse to execute control over every aspect of your life, and to take your freedoms away. This data collected will be used against you in politically motivated ways, and to keep the elites rich and pampered while the rest are oppressed. It will also be used to push in the new world order, tracking your so called carbon footprint and punishing you if you accidentally cross some arbitrary line. It’s so obvious. If you want to protect your children don’t let them use devices unsupervised. Simple. However they are clever and you should monitor your network for extra devices they may have hidden.
    I’m sure you are secure as I was able to hack your network and download a picture of your setup...


    jdwFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 19 of 26
    jdw said:
    "Child safety"?  Who in their right mind would oppose that?  

    Well, I'm a parent originally from California.  "Nanny state" is an understatement.  My eldest is now in college and youngest is a Junior in high school.  They have been safe, secure and doing just fine in their online lives; and yes, I am a parent who cares about his kids.  The internet isn't perfectly safe, but it's much safer than traveling through the Tenderloin in San Francisco.

    Every new law crafted by the human mind comes with incredible reasons and great intentions for its existence, but it's all ultimately done to add more bureaucracy, more red tape, higher taxes, new penalties, and less freedom for everyone. There are so many rules, regulations and laws on the books today that nobody can comply with them all perfectly all the time.  The sheer abundance of rules have made everyone, including you who are now reading my post, into a law-breaker.  (Ever driven 41 in a 40 zone, even briefly?  You're a law-breaker!)

    There's more risk to having less rules, but greater individual liberty is worth it in the end.  A freer world really is a better world, despite some chaos. I say this as a typical American who understands the value of individual liberty, not as an anarchist.  
    Read the book: Three Felonies A Day.

    In most cases, I would say the "incredible reasons" are usually incredibly bad reasons and "great intentions" are not necessarily good or positive intentions (except for empowering those who support the law).
  • Reply 20 of 26
    Some of you people have really disturbing opinions.

    That aside, in the past I was involved in assisting a PTA group that held internet and device safety training courses for parents.  There are a LOT of confused and clueless parents out there.  Many of the parents involved in those sessions spent little time on the internet and were unaware of the type of information their kids could find on a completely unsecured device.  We didn't give them a doom and gloom worst case scenario, but practical tips for how to talk to their kids about device usage, social media, but also how to find a device's browsing history and where parental controls can be applied.  

    Just by commenting on this article, everyone here is more technologically aware, by a significant margin, than the majority of school aged kids' parents are.  We know about the risks and are aware of how to mitigate them.  Kids don't need to be completely locked down, but they are kids and biologically aren't yet equipped to make mature decisions.  Parents need to provide guidance and enforce some rules from time to time.

    This type of legislation is designed for the majority of parents that do not regularly comment on tech forums, and at most have a Facebook account.  I haven't read the legislation, but rules that force websites, apps, and devices to respect and augment the experience for younger age groups would only be a boon overall for society.
    edited August 31 StrangeDayswatto_cobra
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