Apple guts internal communication tool, crippling union organization

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 32
    hexclockhexclock Posts: 1,232member
    mayfly said:
    larrya said:
    Mark of a great company: censorship and insecurity. 
    Sounds like the perfect description. OF TWITTER!
    Sounds like our government, which is the biggest employer in the US by far. 
    edited July 2023
  • Reply 22 of 32
    NYC362NYC362 Posts: 71member
    Loop was never intended as a tool for airing grievances, but an idea hub to make ideas into a reality. I understand that employees get frustrated if Apple appears to not be listening to their grievances, but loop wasn’t made for that and it’s possible that Apple got tired of hearing just complaints and not ideas. 
    This comment is spot on correct.  Loop isn't just a bulletin board for complaining, it is an ideas board- it asks you to explain how to implement your idea, how will help the company, customers, etc. 

    People want to organize a union?  Fine...setting up an online message board really doesn't take too much work:  A private, invite only Facebook group is an easy one. 
    hammeroftruthAlex1N
  • Reply 23 of 32
    timmilleatimmillea Posts: 238member
    Apple is foolish for pursuing an anti-union strategy. Collectivisation has numerous benefits for employer and employee despite the employer's misgivings.

    Top management meeting representatives of the workforce means much ground can be covered in little time, compared to meeting every employee with a grievance, or worse, firing them and having to replace them.

    Pay can be harmonised to save individual negotiation. So, when a worker finds they are being paid considerably less for doing the same or better job as a co-worker, they don't just leave in disgust for a fairer employer and take their knowledge, skills and training with them.

    Collectivisation is fairer, seen to be fairer and is proven to increase both morale and productivity. 

    edited July 2023 robin huberAlex1N
  • Reply 24 of 32
    mayflymayfly Posts: 385member
    M68000 said:
    Would be interesting if Tim Cook and other leadership work at some stores for a couple days.  Let them see what goes on, what it’s like.  Of course they won’t though.  The people who work in retail are on the front line so to speak. 

    I work for a big company, but not in our stores. There was one year the office staff had to work at the stores on black Friday in attempt to have staff understand how retail is.  What an experience,  you get a new respect for people in retail.
    And a new sense of compassion for them.
    Alex1N
  • Reply 25 of 32
    M68000M68000 Posts: 702member
    M68000 said:
    Would be interesting if Tim Cook and other leadership work at some stores for a couple days.  Let them see what goes on, what it’s like.  Of course they won’t though.  The people who work in retail are on the front line so to speak. 

    I work for a big company, but not in our stores. There was one year the office staff had to work at the stores on black Friday in attempt to have staff understand how retail is.  What an experience,  you get a new respect for people in retail.
    Cook is known for surprise visits to stores. 

    And it’s not a new thing either. 

      Visiting a store does not mean working at a store.  
    edited July 2023 mayflyAlex1N
  • Reply 26 of 32
    It's insane that people are defending this.
  • Reply 27 of 32
    Such moves only delay the inevitable after management fails to get the feedback necessary to satisfy workers, and the workers feel ever more like a commodity.

    In this case, the anti-1984 company is become a 1984 company.
    Alex1N
  • Reply 28 of 32
    hexclockhexclock Posts: 1,232member
    timmillea said:
    Apple is foolish for pursuing an anti-union strategy. Collectivisation has numerous benefits for employer and employee despite the employer's misgivings.

    Top management meeting representatives of the workforce means much ground can be covered in little time, compared to meeting every employee with a grievance, or worse, firing them and having to replace them.

    Pay can be harmonised to save individual negotiation. So, when a worker finds they are being paid considerably less for doing the same or better job as a co-worker, they don't just leave in disgust for a fairer employer and take their knowledge, skills and training with them.

    Collectivisation is fairer, seen to be fairer and is proven to increase both morale and productivity. 

    It has pros and cons like everything does. One con is that the laziest person makes the same as the hardest working person. And it’s nearly impossible to get fired being that lazy person. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 29 of 32
    mayflymayfly Posts: 385member
    M68000 said:
    M68000 said:
    Would be interesting if Tim Cook and other leadership work at some stores for a couple days.  Let them see what goes on, what it’s like.  Of course they won’t though.  The people who work in retail are on the front line so to speak. 

    I work for a big company, but not in our stores. There was one year the office staff had to work at the stores on black Friday in attempt to have staff understand how retail is.  What an experience,  you get a new respect for people in retail.
    Cook is known for surprise visits to stores. 

    And it’s not a new thing either. 

      Visiting a store does not mean working at a store.  
    Agreed. And a boss going undercover and working at a store does not mean actually working at a store. He's not dependent on that meager wage to put food on his table and a roof over his family's head. It's just a gimmick, and after a day, or a week, he takes off the wig and drives back to his mansion in his Mercedes. Or gets driven there in his limo.
    muthuk_vanalingamAlex1N
  • Reply 30 of 32
    mayflymayfly Posts: 385member
    slurpy said:
    larrya said:
    Mark of a great company: censorship and insecurity. 

    Bullshit. 

    If Apple isn't considered a "great" company, then what the fuck is? I'd love to know. It's probably the best company that exists today, all things considered. 

    Also, toxic and negative employees trying to stir up trouble can have a poisonous effect on a company and morale. You have no fucking idea as to the details, not every single action can be dismissed childishly as "censorship". 
    Probably the original HP when it was still being run by Bill and Dave.
    The original HP is not the HP that exists today. Not even close. Carly Fiorina saw to that.
    Alex1N
  • Reply 31 of 32

    It appears that the representation of events on Loop is inaccurate. Rather than being used for unionization purposes, Loop primarily served as a platform for providing feedback, sharing experiences, and facilitating communication among employees from different stores. It played a crucial role in allowing Apple employees to feel heard and acknowledged by the company.

    At my store, Loop provided valuable insights. Our leadership tended to downplay any issues that arose, dismissing them as minor, isolated incidents, or exaggerations from our team. This amounted to gaslighting, leaving employees feeling uncertain about their concerns. However, Loop connected us with other stores facing similar challenges, reassuring us that we were not alone in our experiences. This sense of solidarity empowered us to engage in more informed discussions with both our team and leadership.

    For example, the Creative Teams faced difficulties during this year's Apple Camp training. The lack of clear instructions, mismanagement of resources, and ambiguous guidelines made preparation extremely challenging. Utilizing Loop, the Creative Teams could promptly share these issues with their counterparts from other stores, prompting swift resolutions. Furthermore, having concrete evidence on Loop helped store leadership to take their concerns more seriously. Nonetheless, it is worth mentioning that Loop administrators exercised censorship, closing topics and removing comments that they deemed unsuitable.

    Unfortunately, recent changes have significantly limited the functionality of Loop. Users can no longer post or comment on store-related matters, hindering peer-to-peer communication across stores and hampering efforts to address gaslighting by leadership. Moreover, every comment now requires approval, effectively stifling negative feedback and discouraging open expression.

    Additionally, Apple strictly enforces policies against negative posts about the company on social media or any online platform. This has led to employees feeling reluctant to discuss their experiences publicly, with some even resorting to labeling their employer as "The Fruit Stand" to avoid repercussions.

    Given the risks associated with discussing working conditions online, Loop offered one of the few safe spaces for employees to voice their concerns without fear of jeopardizing their jobs. However, its recent restrictions have limited this avenue for employees to be heard and have further isolated teams within the organization.

    Alex1N
  • Reply 32 of 32
    M68000 said:
    Would be interesting if Tim Cook and other leadership work at some stores for a couple days.  Let them see what goes on, what it’s like.  Of course they won’t though.  The people who work in retail are on the front line so to speak. 

    I work for a big company, but not in our stores. There was one year the office staff had to work at the stores on black Friday in attempt to have staff understand how retail is.  What an experience,  you get a new respect for people in retail.
    I agree, people would have a whole different level of understanding once they are in the front lines. There is a big disconnect between what happens in the corporate offices and retail locations. A lot has changed in the apple retail world over the years for the worst, however, they still try to convince new years it is a great place to be.. It can be culty at times and it is sad to see. 
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