Kuo: Apple Watch is seeing a big sales decline year-over-year in 2023

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 26
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 2,009member
    mayfly said:
    iOS_Guy80 said:
    Japhey said:
    mayfly said:
    iOS_Guy80 said:
    mayfly said:
    Apple's problem is that everyone who wants an Apple Watch already has one. And their incremental changes aren't going to drive upgrade cycles. The Ultra was new and different, but the buy-in was a big deterrent for the mass market. Things like Micro-LED screens won't do it. A total rethink is what it will take. I can't think of anything the Apple Watch 9 offers that would even make me consider upgrading my 7 series.
    Upgraded from series 7 to series 9, really enjoying the brighter screen, faster processor, looking forward to double tap feature. WatchOS 10 takes the user interface and Watch experiencce to the next level.
    Well, since I have WatcOS 10 on my series 7, still not sold. I can see my watch screen just fine. But I'm curious about how exactly does a faster processor improve your use? I don't notice any lag at all when using my watch.
    I would also like to know the answer to that question. We’ve all made excuses to justify expensive upgrades, but this one needs a little more explanation. I’ve never wished my Series 7 was faster…not even once. 
    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder I guess. Maybe it’s my imagination but everything just seems to run a little smoother and zippier on series 9. I suspect apps will take advantage of the faster chip to do who knows what? Apples buyback for the upgrade from series 7 to 9 was also very generous.
    "Apples buyback for the upgrade from series 7 to 9 was also very generous."
    Buying something you don't need because it's on sale, or takes trade-ins, is the reason Millenials and GenZ's can't afford to buy homes.
    No, a significant shortage of supply at most price points is the reason Millennials, GenZs and a lot more folks can’t afford to buy homes.
    ronnwilliamlondonwatto_cobraBart Y
  • Reply 22 of 26
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 2,009member
    Toortog said:
    Apple Watch has same issue as iPhone and computers they pretty much have gone as far as they can feature wise not a lot new to add.   The watch only things left are new types of health sensors that are slow in development.   That leaves improving battery and cosmetic changes even a better screen is a minor update at this point.   
    And every tech company hopes you work for their competition’s R&D department. 
    ronnwilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 26
    mayflymayfly Posts: 385member
    AppleZulu said:
    mayfly said:
    iOS_Guy80 said:
    Japhey said:
    mayfly said:
    iOS_Guy80 said:
    mayfly said:
    Apple's problem is that everyone who wants an Apple Watch already has one. And their incremental changes aren't going to drive upgrade cycles. The Ultra was new and different, but the buy-in was a big deterrent for the mass market. Things like Micro-LED screens won't do it. A total rethink is what it will take. I can't think of anything the Apple Watch 9 offers that would even make me consider upgrading my 7 series.
    Upgraded from series 7 to series 9, really enjoying the brighter screen, faster processor, looking forward to double tap feature. WatchOS 10 takes the user interface and Watch experiencce to the next level.
    Well, since I have WatcOS 10 on my series 7, still not sold. I can see my watch screen just fine. But I'm curious about how exactly does a faster processor improve your use? I don't notice any lag at all when using my watch.
    I would also like to know the answer to that question. We’ve all made excuses to justify expensive upgrades, but this one needs a little more explanation. I’ve never wished my Series 7 was faster…not even once. 
    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder I guess. Maybe it’s my imagination but everything just seems to run a little smoother and zippier on series 9. I suspect apps will take advantage of the faster chip to do who knows what? Apples buyback for the upgrade from series 7 to 9 was also very generous.
    "Apples buyback for the upgrade from series 7 to 9 was also very generous."
    Buying something you don't need because it's on sale, or takes trade-ins, is the reason Millenials and GenZ's can't afford to buy homes.
    No, a significant shortage of supply at most price points is the reason Millennials, GenZs and a lot more folks can’t afford to buy homes.
    You forgot to blame student loan debt. But you can buy a 2 bedroom, 1 bath, true brick Georgian house with a two car detached garage in my Chicago neighborhood (Norwood Park) for $250-275K right now. We're a neighborhood with mature tree-lined streets, many cops and firemen live here, it's 1 block to a K-8 school, 5 blocks from Taft High School, 7 minutes from O'Hare, two blocks from the bus, 8 blocks from the El or the Metra. Two churches within 6 blocks, a Jewel-Osco (Albertsons), a Mariano's (Kroger), Amazon Fresh, Butera (Certified Grocers) and two produce supermarkets within 2 miles, Starbucks, Panera, Chipotle, you name it. Also numerous great family-run Italian, Chinese, Thai and Indian restaurants in walking distance or a short drive. Almost forgot to mention, lower overall and violent crime rates than almost all the surrounding suburbs.

    They're only about 1,000 square feet (plus full basements, many of them finished), but how much does a single GenZ need? And as the young families move in, they're able to put an addition to the back, since the back yards are so large. So I'm calling BS on the "short supply at most price points." The Millennials and Z's just spend too much on cars, electronic diversion and entertainment, all financed with both bank and credit card debt.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 26
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 2,009member
    mayfly said:
    AppleZulu said:
    mayfly said:
    iOS_Guy80 said:
    Japhey said:
    mayfly said:
    iOS_Guy80 said:
    mayfly said:
    Apple's problem is that everyone who wants an Apple Watch already has one. And their incremental changes aren't going to drive upgrade cycles. The Ultra was new and different, but the buy-in was a big deterrent for the mass market. Things like Micro-LED screens won't do it. A total rethink is what it will take. I can't think of anything the Apple Watch 9 offers that would even make me consider upgrading my 7 series.
    Upgraded from series 7 to series 9, really enjoying the brighter screen, faster processor, looking forward to double tap feature. WatchOS 10 takes the user interface and Watch experiencce to the next level.
    Well, since I have WatcOS 10 on my series 7, still not sold. I can see my watch screen just fine. But I'm curious about how exactly does a faster processor improve your use? I don't notice any lag at all when using my watch.
    I would also like to know the answer to that question. We’ve all made excuses to justify expensive upgrades, but this one needs a little more explanation. I’ve never wished my Series 7 was faster…not even once. 
    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder I guess. Maybe it’s my imagination but everything just seems to run a little smoother and zippier on series 9. I suspect apps will take advantage of the faster chip to do who knows what? Apples buyback for the upgrade from series 7 to 9 was also very generous.
    "Apples buyback for the upgrade from series 7 to 9 was also very generous."
    Buying something you don't need because it's on sale, or takes trade-ins, is the reason Millenials and GenZ's can't afford to buy homes.
    No, a significant shortage of supply at most price points is the reason Millennials, GenZs and a lot more folks can’t afford to buy homes.
    You forgot to blame student loan debt. But you can buy a 2 bedroom, 1 bath, true brick Georgian house with a two car detached garage in my Chicago neighborhood (Norwood Park) for $250-275K right now. We're a neighborhood with mature tree-lined streets, many cops and firemen live here, it's 1 block to a K-8 school, 5 blocks from Taft High School, 7 minutes from O'Hare, two blocks from the bus, 8 blocks from the El or the Metra. Two churches within 6 blocks, a Jewel-Osco (Albertsons), a Mariano's (Kroger), Amazon Fresh, Butera (Certified Grocers) and two produce supermarkets within 2 miles, Starbucks, Panera, Chipotle, you name it. Also numerous great family-run Italian, Chinese, Thai and Indian restaurants in walking distance or a short drive. Almost forgot to mention, lower overall and violent crime rates than almost all the surrounding suburbs.

    They're only about 1,000 square feet (plus full basements, many of them finished), but how much does a single GenZ need? And as the young families move in, they're able to put an addition to the back, since the back yards are so large. So I'm calling BS on the "short supply at most price points." The Millennials and Z's just spend too much on cars, electronic diversion and entertainment, all financed with both bank and credit card debt.
    Sure, anecdotes are a great way to generalize about national trends. Also, I just looked and could not find that listing in your neighborhood. The only thing in that price range were 1,100 square foot apartments. $200K and up to buy a tiny apartment condo, with $400+ monthly HOA fees! 

    As long as we're looking at anecdotes, I did find a 1053 square foot 2 bedroom, one bath house there listed for $289,000. With a  typical mortgage, taxes, utilities and insurance on that, it would mean that the buyer needs to make probably north of $90,000 per year to reasonably afford it. Of course, I don't want to disappoint. If you have a $300 - $400 student loan payment, you'll probably want to be making a little more if you want to buy that house and not have to eat raman noodles for the next twenty years.

    But really, this was just about some offhand snark about dumb kids wasting their money on Apple watch upgrades. And of course, the truth is, most people, including Millennials and GenZ, don't upgrade Apple hardware on a one or two-year cycle, so your whole point is moot anyway.
    Bart Y
  • Reply 25 of 26
    mayflymayfly Posts: 385member
    AppleZulu said:
    mayfly said:
    AppleZulu said:
    mayfly said:
    iOS_Guy80 said:
    Japhey said:
    mayfly said:
    iOS_Guy80 said:
    mayfly said:
    Apple's problem is that everyone who wants an Apple Watch already has one. And their incremental changes aren't going to drive upgrade cycles. The Ultra was new and different, but the buy-in was a big deterrent for the mass market. Things like Micro-LED screens won't do it. A total rethink is what it will take. I can't think of anything the Apple Watch 9 offers that would even make me consider upgrading my 7 series.
    Upgraded from series 7 to series 9, really enjoying the brighter screen, faster processor, looking forward to double tap feature. WatchOS 10 takes the user interface and Watch experiencce to the next level.
    Well, since I have WatcOS 10 on my series 7, still not sold. I can see my watch screen just fine. But I'm curious about how exactly does a faster processor improve your use? I don't notice any lag at all when using my watch.
    I would also like to know the answer to that question. We’ve all made excuses to justify expensive upgrades, but this one needs a little more explanation. I’ve never wished my Series 7 was faster…not even once. 
    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder I guess. Maybe it’s my imagination but everything just seems to run a little smoother and zippier on series 9. I suspect apps will take advantage of the faster chip to do who knows what? Apples buyback for the upgrade from series 7 to 9 was also very generous.
    "Apples buyback for the upgrade from series 7 to 9 was also very generous."
    Buying something you don't need because it's on sale, or takes trade-ins, is the reason Millenials and GenZ's can't afford to buy homes.
    No, a significant shortage of supply at most price points is the reason Millennials, GenZs and a lot more folks can’t afford to buy homes.
    You forgot to blame student loan debt. But you can buy a 2 bedroom, 1 bath, true brick Georgian house with a two car detached garage in my Chicago neighborhood (Norwood Park) for $250-275K right now. We're a neighborhood with mature tree-lined streets, many cops and firemen live here, it's 1 block to a K-8 school, 5 blocks from Taft High School, 7 minutes from O'Hare, two blocks from the bus, 8 blocks from the El or the Metra. Two churches within 6 blocks, a Jewel-Osco (Albertsons), a Mariano's (Kroger), Amazon Fresh, Butera (Certified Grocers) and two produce supermarkets within 2 miles, Starbucks, Panera, Chipotle, you name it. Also numerous great family-run Italian, Chinese, Thai and Indian restaurants in walking distance or a short drive. Almost forgot to mention, lower overall and violent crime rates than almost all the surrounding suburbs.

    They're only about 1,000 square feet (plus full basements, many of them finished), but how much does a single GenZ need? And as the young families move in, they're able to put an addition to the back, since the back yards are so large. So I'm calling BS on the "short supply at most price points." The Millennials and Z's just spend too much on cars, electronic diversion and entertainment, all financed with both bank and credit card debt.
    Sure, anecdotes are a great way to generalize about national trends. Also, I just looked and could not find that listing in your neighborhood. The only thing in that price range were 1,100 square foot apartments. $200K and up to buy a tiny apartment condo, with $400+ monthly HOA fees! 

    As long as we're looking at anecdotes, I did find a 1053 square foot 2 bedroom, one bath house there listed for $289,000. With a  typical mortgage, taxes, utilities and insurance on that, it would mean that the buyer needs to make probably north of $90,000 per year to reasonably afford it. Of course, I don't want to disappoint. If you have a $300 - $400 student loan payment, you'll probably want to be making a little more if you want to buy that house and not have to eat raman noodles for the next twenty years.

    But really, this was just about some offhand snark about dumb kids wasting their money on Apple watch upgrades. And of course, the truth is, most people, including Millennials and GenZ, don't upgrade Apple hardware on a one or two-year cycle, so your whole point is moot anyway.
    Well that's great news! A $289,000 home is beyond the reach of maybe 30% of single income buyers. And 0% of couples. Our neighbors, a retired pharmacist, a firefighter/nurse couple (who just bought the house next door for $309,000), another nurse, a retired security guard and us (retired teacher/tradesman), and across the street, the CPD officer, a Polish widow, an FBI special agent, will be glad to hear that our houses will go to good young families when it's time for us to move on, just as we came into our house 32 years ago. And that we'll be able to afford the move to a great senior community when we sell our house for at least $289K! Maybe more!
  • Reply 26 of 26
    Bart YBart Y Posts: 67unconfirmed, member

    Apple's problem is that everyone who wants an Apple Watch already has one. And their incremental changes aren't going to drive upgrade cycles. The Ultra was new and different, but the buy-in was a big deterrent for the mass market. Things like Micro-LED screens won't do it. A total rethink is what it will take. I can't think of anything the Apple Watch 9 I’m way too old for this, and I can’t believe I’m admitting it, as I’m one of these guys that wear AW for fitness functionality and could care less about appearance or watch face or even access or functionality. Just give me some basic information that I want on the watch face and let me run Map my Fitness or Map my run on it and stay out of my way. I can’t even remember how to use Apple Pay on the thing and use my phone instead. But the new Snoopy watch face has sucked me in somehow, and I’m totally hooked. I look at my watch throughout the day, just to see the snoopy watch face. I’ve given up all watch face information and functionality that I ever cared about.  If Apple had managed to instead make this snoopy watch face a fashion statement and connected to an upgrade dependency, there could’ve been something impactful here in terms of sales.  Rest of us would’ve grumbled sure. But this once again makes me wonder, is Apple Watch really a product line for Apple, or does this just enrich the iPhone apple ecosystem and customer loyalty? They don’t seem to be all that concerned about upgrade cycles or sales volume.  Personally, that makes me like AW and also apple better. 
    Glad you love the new Snoopy watch face and that helps you to consider an upgrade.   As you’ve surmised, Apple is providing new models for everyone who wants one.  They aren’t forcing anyone to upgrade and those who feel there isn’t enough change to upgrade, they’re fine with folks continuing to happily use their Apple Watch, whatever the model and series.  These folks will know the Apple Watch has great longevity, strength, and functionality for years.

    As for using Apple Pay on Apple Watch, it’s very simple once you’ve set up your credit card into Apple Wallet, and you’re synced with your iPhone, your card is loaded onto Wallet App on Apple Watch.  Check you iPhone’s Watch App to confirm and settings for other card info and notifications.

    If all that is good, then simply double press the Watch side button and your Apple Pay credit card appears.  Then simply place your watch face over the card reader terminal’s Tap sign ))> and wait for the confirmation beep and or haptic.  The terminal should say “transaction complete” or “transaction approved”, and you’re done!  No muss, no fuss, no touching the terminal, no need to pull your iPhone out, no need for your iPhone or even wallet to be on your person if you forgot it/them at home or in your car.  Watch can do Apple Pay without anything so long as you’ve properly unlocked it.

    it really is that simple and that convenient for the merchants who will take Apple Pay.  Notably WalMart, Home Depot, Lowe’s, and a few others won’t take NFC payments like Apple Pay and Google Pay, preferring for you to use their proprietary pay services so they can gather your info, tie in to your bank debit or credit card info, and track your purchases and buying behaviors so they can sell that info, share it, or target ads to you.  Apple does none of that except give you a summary of your transactions for your own records or analysis, plus makes the transactions tokenized so the merchant and CC system NEVER sees your CV numbers.

    Just another way Apple protects your privacy and provides another “just works brilliantly” service to your Apple devices ecosystem.
    ronn
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