Three M3 chips could land in Monday's Mac line refresh

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 33
    I would love to know more about Apple's unusual choice of time for this event, which doesn't make any sense to me. Their typical 10AM/PT and 1PM/ET start time always gives them dominance of the midday and afternoon business news. But with 5PM/8PM, they've chosen rush hour on the west coast and the start of primetime TV viewing on the east coast. Neither is a great time unless you're hoping to bury your announcements. Why not just push "Scary Fast" to the next day for an appropriate Halloween stunt at 10AM/1PM? 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 22 of 33
    XedXed Posts: 2,704member
    charlesn said:
    I would love to know more about Apple's unusual choice of time for this event, which doesn't make any sense to me. Their typical 10AM/PT and 1PM/ET start time always gives them dominance of the midday and afternoon business news. But with 5PM/8PM, they've chosen rush hour on the west coast and the start of primetime TV viewing on the east coast. Neither is a great time unless you're hoping to bury your announcements. Why not just push "Scary Fast" to the next day for an appropriate Halloween stunt at 10AM/1PM? 
    Since it’s all prerecorded and so many people never watch it “live” or in it’s entirety (just clips in the media / social media / product specific clips on Apple.com) they probably don’t see it as necessary to be an event on Tuesday (or Wednesday if Monday was a holiday) at 10am PST like they did for their previous events where it was imperative to get reporters to travel to Apple’s campus to get full coverage. 

    That said, while those are all plausible reasons they may also be simply trying something new for its own sake. Covid forced their hands with the new format and it has made their presentations more thorough and polished with fewer hiccups and dead space. Why not try something different on your own terms now and again?
    williamlondon
  • Reply 23 of 33
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,585member
    If this is true, about three versions available quickly, at once, it mirrors what I’ve been saying. All the hard work has been dine with the M1 series. That’s where most of the R&D went and most of the design and production time and money. It became easier with M2 as they already knew how to do it and with version 3, M3, it’s pretty much a done deal, so they weren’t chewing their fingernails every time a new, higher end chip came out.

    so there’s no reason why Apple, like AMD and Intel, can’t come out with several varieties of chips at once. Also, most likely, they don’t have that many types. The Extreme and Ultra are two chips with the on chip interconnects. So they can be made on the same wafer as the lower version. When tested, they would be separated by binning. If bothe chips connected are good, it’s an Extreme or Ultra. If one is good, then it’s not.
    Xed
  • Reply 24 of 33
    XedXed Posts: 2,704member
    melgross said:
    If this is true, about three versions available quickly, at once, it mirrors what I’ve been saying. All the hard work has been dine with the M1 series. That’s where most of the R&D went and most of the design and production time and money. It became easier with M2 as they already knew how to do it and with version 3, M3, it’s pretty much a done deal, so they weren’t chewing their fingernails every time a new, higher end chip came out.

    so there’s no reason why Apple, like AMD and Intel, can’t come out with several varieties of chips at once. Also, most likely, they don’t have that many types. The Extreme and Ultra are two chips with the on chip interconnects. So they can be made on the same wafer as the lower version. When tested, they would be separated by binning. If bothe chips connected are good, it’s an Extreme or Ultra. If one is good, then it’s not.
    I seem to recall reading about the binning process for using A-series chips not suitable for the iPhone in the Apple TV with a disabled core that wasn’t working as expected.
  • Reply 25 of 33
    blastdoor said:
    Meteor lake is supposed to launch in December. It will be very interesting to see how the m3 lineup compares. I wonder if meteor lake comparisons are one reason Apple is launching pro and max now
    Apple doesn't give a crap about anything Intel is doing. Why should they?

    My wife's M1 MBAir totally trashes my "professional" (T-series) Lenovo work machine. Everything is better on the Air. It is way faster, it lasts days (yes, days) on a charge compared to hours (if I'm lucky) and has a usable trackpad. The only upside to the Lenovo is the really good keyboard. The Lenovo cost more too.

    So yeah, they care not. Their customers don't either.
    canukstormdanox
  • Reply 26 of 33
    If it this is a full range of M3s processors, it marks an uptick in Apple's development and update cycle. Apple unlike INTEL, AMD, etc, only has to develop a small number of chips compared to their competition, which give them a distinct advantage.
  • Reply 27 of 33
    dewmedewme Posts: 5,544member
    Xed said:
    charlesn said:
    I would love to know more about Apple's unusual choice of time for this event, which doesn't make any sense to me. Their typical 10AM/PT and 1PM/ET start time always gives them dominance of the midday and afternoon business news. But with 5PM/8PM, they've chosen rush hour on the west coast and the start of primetime TV viewing on the east coast. Neither is a great time unless you're hoping to bury your announcements. Why not just push "Scary Fast" to the next day for an appropriate Halloween stunt at 10AM/1PM? 
    Since it’s all prerecorded and so many people never watch it “live” or in it’s entirety (just clips in the media / social media / product specific clips on Apple.com) they probably don’t see it as necessary to be an event on Tuesday (or Wednesday if Monday was a holiday) at 10am PST like they did for their previous events where it was imperative to get reporters to travel to Apple’s campus to get full coverage. 

    That said, while those are all plausible reasons they may also be simply trying something new for its own sake. Covid forced their hands with the new format and it has made their presentations more thorough and polished with fewer hiccups and dead space. Why not try something different on your own terms now and again?
    I've been really wondering about the unusual presentation time as well. If Apple was rolling out something truly extraordinary, which a new SoC the likes of which the world has never seen would command, at least for Apple fans, why the heck would they bury the announcement in that time slot?

    The west coast of the US is stuck in traffic commuting home from work.
    The east coast of the US is settling into prime time TV viewing time with MLB World Series Game 3 and NFL Monday Night Football, not to mention a new episode of Antiques Roadshow on PBS ... cough ... cough.
    The UK and EU have already gone to bed.
    China, Singapore, and much of SE Asia are stuck in morning traffic commuting to work.
    Japan is at work being highly efficient and outstandingly productive.

    As someone else already mentioned, the presentation time seems to be a reasonable compromise to allow viewers in the Americas and Asia to be watching the presentation at the same time. UK and EU - sorry! As an aside, when I had software team members in Singapore, China, and North America all working together on the same project we always had our full team meetings at 20:00 (8 PM) US east coast time (EST/EDT).  

    I guess we will see in few hours what's behind the choice of presentation time. To our UK/EU fans - sleep tight. There may be a big surprise for you in the morning.
    edited October 2023
  • Reply 28 of 33
    XedXed Posts: 2,704member
    dewme said:
    Xed said:
    charlesn said:
    I would love to know more about Apple's unusual choice of time for this event, which doesn't make any sense to me. Their typical 10AM/PT and 1PM/ET start time always gives them dominance of the midday and afternoon business news. But with 5PM/8PM, they've chosen rush hour on the west coast and the start of primetime TV viewing on the east coast. Neither is a great time unless you're hoping to bury your announcements. Why not just push "Scary Fast" to the next day for an appropriate Halloween stunt at 10AM/1PM? 
    Since it’s all prerecorded and so many people never watch it “live” or in it’s entirety (just clips in the media / social media / product specific clips on Apple.com) they probably don’t see it as necessary to be an event on Tuesday (or Wednesday if Monday was a holiday) at 10am PST like they did for their previous events where it was imperative to get reporters to travel to Apple’s campus to get full coverage. 

    That said, while those are all plausible reasons they may also be simply trying something new for its own sake. Covid forced their hands with the new format and it has made their presentations more thorough and polished with fewer hiccups and dead space. Why not try something different on your own terms now and again?
    I've been really wondering about the unusual presentation time as well. If Apple was rolling out something truly extraordinary, which a new SoC the likes of which the world has never seen would command, at least for Apple fans, why the heck would they bury the announcement in that time slot?

    The west coast of the US is stuck in traffic commuting home from work.
    The east coast of the US is settling into prime time TV viewing time with MLB World Series Game 3 and NFL Monday Night Football, not to mention a new episode of Antiques Roadshow on PBS ... cough ... cough.
    The UK and EU have already gone to bed.
    China, Singapore, and much of SE Asia are stuck in morning traffic commuting to work.
    Japan is at work being highly efficient and outstandingly productive.

    As someone else already mentioned, the presentation time seems to be a reasonable compromise to allow viewers in the Americas and Asia to be watching the presentation at the same time. UK and EU - sorry! As an aside, when I had software team members in Singapore, China, and North America all working together on the same project we always had our full team meetings at 20:00 (8 PM) US east coast time (EST/EDT).  

    I guess we will see in few hours what's behind the choice of presentation time. To our UK/EU fans - sleep tight. There may be a big surprise for you in the morning.
    None of this needs to be seen the moment it airs so it’s not a big deal when it’s they announce it. Kinda like how many streaming services drop at midnight (which may or may not be at 9pm PST/PT).

    we should keep in mind that the Mac is considerably less popular than the iPhone so changing it things up for this event does make sense. You can’t as easily test this for the iPhone event of WWDC.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 29 of 33
    dewmedewme Posts: 5,544member
    Xed said:
    dewme said:
    Xed said:
    charlesn said:
    I would love to know more about Apple's unusual choice of time for this event, which doesn't make any sense to me. Their typical 10AM/PT and 1PM/ET start time always gives them dominance of the midday and afternoon business news. But with 5PM/8PM, they've chosen rush hour on the west coast and the start of primetime TV viewing on the east coast. Neither is a great time unless you're hoping to bury your announcements. Why not just push "Scary Fast" to the next day for an appropriate Halloween stunt at 10AM/1PM? 
    Since it’s all prerecorded and so many people never watch it “live” or in it’s entirety (just clips in the media / social media / product specific clips on Apple.com) they probably don’t see it as necessary to be an event on Tuesday (or Wednesday if Monday was a holiday) at 10am PST like they did for their previous events where it was imperative to get reporters to travel to Apple’s campus to get full coverage. 

    That said, while those are all plausible reasons they may also be simply trying something new for its own sake. Covid forced their hands with the new format and it has made their presentations more thorough and polished with fewer hiccups and dead space. Why not try something different on your own terms now and again?
    I've been really wondering about the unusual presentation time as well. If Apple was rolling out something truly extraordinary, which a new SoC the likes of which the world has never seen would command, at least for Apple fans, why the heck would they bury the announcement in that time slot?

    The west coast of the US is stuck in traffic commuting home from work.
    The east coast of the US is settling into prime time TV viewing time with MLB World Series Game 3 and NFL Monday Night Football, not to mention a new episode of Antiques Roadshow on PBS ... cough ... cough.
    The UK and EU have already gone to bed.
    China, Singapore, and much of SE Asia are stuck in morning traffic commuting to work.
    Japan is at work being highly efficient and outstandingly productive.

    As someone else already mentioned, the presentation time seems to be a reasonable compromise to allow viewers in the Americas and Asia to be watching the presentation at the same time. UK and EU - sorry! As an aside, when I had software team members in Singapore, China, and North America all working together on the same project we always had our full team meetings at 20:00 (8 PM) US east coast time (EST/EDT).  

    I guess we will see in few hours what's behind the choice of presentation time. To our UK/EU fans - sleep tight. There may be a big surprise for you in the morning.
    None of this needs to be seen the moment it airs so it’s not a big deal when it’s they announce it. Kinda like how many streaming services drop at midnight (which may or may not be at 9pm PST/PT).

    we should keep in mind that the Mac is considerably less popular than the iPhone so changing it things up for this event does make sense. You can’t as easily test this for the iPhone event of WWDC.
    Anything is possible. Having a mid-late October announcement is not at all unusual (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Apple_Inc._media_events) but the time of day is seen as rather unusual. We'll see whether this is of any significance very shortly. It may be as simple as picking a time that's more conducive for creating a party atmosphere in some time zones.
    edited October 2023
  • Reply 30 of 33
    Where is the M3 27 inch iMac? Why it tales years to crank out an upgraded 27 inch iMac? 
    williamlondon
  • Reply 31 of 33
    XedXed Posts: 2,704member
    dutchlord said:
    Where is the M3 27 inch iMac? Why it tales years to crank out an upgraded 27 inch iMac? 
    Your question assumes that they have an engineering difficulty making a 27” iMac v wanting to spend the resources making a Mac that they don’t think will sell well.

    Maybe that will show up today which could mean that they found a way to reduce component and engineering costs to make it worthwhile for them. Whatever it is, it certainly won’t be altruism.
    FileMakerFeller
  • Reply 32 of 33
    danoxdanox Posts: 3,107member
    Xed said:
    dutchlord said:
    Where is the M3 27 inch iMac? Why it tales years to crank out an upgraded 27 inch iMac? 
    Your question assumes that they have an engineering difficulty making a 27” iMac v wanting to spend the resources making a Mac that they don’t think will sell well.

    Maybe that will show up today which could mean that they found a way to reduce component and engineering costs to make it worthwhile for them. Whatever it is, it certainly won’t be altruism.
    The 27 inch iMac would sell well to the public, but it’s not the Mac Apple wants to sell. 
    9secondkox2
  • Reply 33 of 33
    XedXed Posts: 2,704member
    danox said:
    Xed said:
    dutchlord said:
    Where is the M3 27 inch iMac? Why it tales years to crank out an upgraded 27 inch iMac? 
    Your question assumes that they have an engineering difficulty making a 27” iMac v wanting to spend the resources making a Mac that they don’t think will sell well.

    Maybe that will show up today which could mean that they found a way to reduce component and engineering costs to make it worthwhile for them. Whatever it is, it certainly won’t be altruism.
    The 27 inch iMac would sell well to the public, but it’s not the Mac Apple wants to sell. 
    So you’re claiming Apple would make a great profit on a 27” iMac but it choosing to leave money on the table because why? It hates generating revenue and profit? To spite you? If you’re going to claim that a company doesn’t want to do something you really should have an argument as to why, especially when you’ve already made what appear to be unfounded claims that “it would sell well”.
    9secondkox2
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