Apple's iPhone parts pairing is making the company billions

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 29
    Draco said:
    Many of the iPhone's sub-systems like the displays and cameras are highly complex devices that would be very difficult for a third party to duplicate while preserving the quality Apple's customers expect. Some may also contain calibration data that resides in the phone memory and hence that's why you can't swap modules from phone to phone and expect them to work properly. 

    Knock-off batteries and power adapters can also pose a safety hazard to users and I would highly recommend only purchasing the Apple versions of these even if they cost a few bucks more. 

    You're missing the point. This isn't about knock-off parts: it's about parts which come from otherwise dead devices. If a screen is cracked, all the other parts of the phone are likely good and can be reused. But Apple deliberate uses parts locking to prevent anyone from harvesting parts from iPhones (and iPads), in order to increase its own profits.
    muthuk_vanalingamwilliamlondon
  • Reply 22 of 29
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 932member
    Bottom line? Use an authorized part of lose the warranty. 
    williamlondon
  • Reply 23 of 29
    danoxdanox Posts: 2,858member
    badmonk said:
    I have news for the NY Times and all the right to repair advocates in this forum but new model cars often require specialized diagnostic software and expertise available only to dealers so cars are not a great example as quoted in their article.

    But you know in these times when everyone is starring at their phones, no one can think of anything but Apple and iPhones and App stores.

    I have used iPhones only since 2007 and have never had a device fail on me (with the exception of a single battery expansion which was repaired).

    The bottom line is that if not abused they are incredibly durable due to their build quality.  My friends that use other devices have produced much more e-waste.

    In all cases I have handed my used iPhones down to family members or resold them on eBay after two to three years of use.

    Cars need that specialist diagnostic software and expertise not because it's actually mechanically required, but because manufacturers deliberately build in VIN-locking and will go after anyone who tries to circumvent it with a DMCA 1201 suit.

    As electronic products get more advanced it’s gonna take more expertise to fix them and the same thing applies to those fancy new EV’s rolling about. The jack ass on the corner in a chop shop isn’t gonna be able to fix it at least not well and certainly not with original parts, only thing that the I fix it movement is going to produce is a bigger market for stolen parts.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 24 of 29
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,685member
    sbdude said:
    avon b7 said:
    rob53 said:
    For all you EU commenters, why don’t you simply buy a mobile device made in a EU country? Or wait, there aren’t any that compare to iPhones and Google phones. We can’t help you fix your country or the cartel (EU) so I suggest you accept what Apple is doing to protect your investment.  
    Why would that be? 

    Be careful with what you wish for because just such a move might appear at some point. 

    Why do you think the EU processor initiative came into being? 

    And how's that initiative coming along?
    Actually, very well since the last time I checked. And funding has been increased.

    The point though is not how well it is or isn't doing. The point was making strategic moves to reduce dependencies. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 25 of 29
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,685member
    danox said:
    badmonk said:
    I have news for the NY Times and all the right to repair advocates in this forum but new model cars often require specialized diagnostic software and expertise available only to dealers so cars are not a great example as quoted in their article.

    But you know in these times when everyone is starring at their phones, no one can think of anything but Apple and iPhones and App stores.

    I have used iPhones only since 2007 and have never had a device fail on me (with the exception of a single battery expansion which was repaired).

    The bottom line is that if not abused they are incredibly durable due to their build quality.  My friends that use other devices have produced much more e-waste.

    In all cases I have handed my used iPhones down to family members or resold them on eBay after two to three years of use.

    Cars need that specialist diagnostic software and expertise not because it's actually mechanically required, but because manufacturers deliberately build in VIN-locking and will go after anyone who tries to circumvent it with a DMCA 1201 suit.

    As electronic products get more advanced it’s gonna take more expertise to fix them and the same thing applies to those fancy new EV’s rolling about. The jack ass on the corner in a chop shop isn’t gonna be able to fix it at least not well and certainly not with original parts, only thing that the I fix it movement is going to produce is a bigger market for stolen parts.
    How is that relevant to opening up the third party repair business, validation process, providing competition and reducing Apple's grip on the repair business profits? 

    The whole point is that with a vibrant out of warranty third party repair industry, users would be able to choose the shop of their liking, Apple (but not only Apple) would be forced to compete and prices will even out.

    There is more to it than that though and Apple needs to design for repair. 
  • Reply 26 of 29
    The parts serialisation prevents:
    • Stolen phone's parts sold in black markets.
    • Intelligence agencies manipulations to spy the user.
    • Bad repairs.
    thtjony0teejay2012
  • Reply 27 of 29
    This parts locking also significantly changes the value of a stolen phone, hopefully to the point where there is no financial incentive to having them stolen.  That can be a big improvement to our physical safety and is seemingly dismissed by those wanting open season on parts availability.
    thtjony0
  • Reply 28 of 29
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,685member
    melliott said:
    This parts locking also significantly changes the value of a stolen phone, hopefully to the point where there is no financial incentive to having them stolen.  That can be a big improvement to our physical safety and is seemingly dismissed by those wanting open season on parts availability.
    What's to stop parts being registered to an AppleID? 
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