System Settings getting shuffled again in macOS 15, among other UI tweaks

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 36
    OT (but not really) I am  wondering why Apple does not make settings support split view in iPadOS.  Often times I want to follow instructions. A YouTuber is giving me or that I am reading on another page in Safari much easier to follow those instructions. If I could see them at the same time, I was implementing the instructions in settings.
  • Reply 22 of 36
    nerudaneruda Posts: 440member
    elijahg said:
    System settings is still much worse than the old one. 

    The old system settings UI showed you everything on one screen.  I find myself constantly scrolling up and down in the new iOS like system settings (despite the search box at the top), and has anyone noticed how the control panel in Windows 10/11 looks more and more like the old MacOS one? I agree with you that the old UI was much better. 
    williamlondon
  • Reply 23 of 36
    sphericspheric Posts: 2,625member
    jrcw said:
    Why has Apple consistently refused to include a Install/Uninstall applications manager?
    Because installation/deinstallation is usually just a drag-and-drop operation. Who cares whether there is a few KB of inert preference files sitting in your ~/Library/ folder until you maybe decide to reinstall at a later date? 

    Applications that require an installer should all come with a DEinstaller, since what they actually install (and where) varies greatly from product to product. I don't blame Apple for not keeping track of everything third-party out there. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 24 of 36
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,585member
    timmillea said:
    To make the Mac forever more 'iPhone' is a terrible mistake. It makes the Mac harder to use and makes it more and more redundant. If I wanted an iPhone as my main computing device, I would just use my iPhone! The Mac should have distinct modus operandi. 

    I absolutely hate the new System Settings in Mac OS. I feel abused by them. Safari has gone downhill by not working correctly with many sites and if they interfere with Calculator, I may abandon Mac for good. None of these changes have been in right direction. Where is the Mac team when you need them?
    Safari’s problem is a Google problem. I don’t know if you were around when most sites hewed to standards and features from Microsoft’s IE. Other browsers had the same problems were having now, but worse. Since Google’s browser has taken over most of the market, worldwide, sites are again writing to that instead of universally. That’s what happens with a monoculture.
    timmillea
  • Reply 25 of 36
    michelb76michelb76 Posts: 659member
    Now if they made the window slightly larger, we could have a 'favourites' or 'recently/frequently used' set of icons for the things you need most.
  • Reply 26 of 36
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,447member
    timmillea said:
    To make the Mac forever more 'iPhone' is a terrible mistake. It makes the Mac harder to use and makes it more and more redundant. If I wanted an iPhone as my main computing device, I would just use my iPhone! The Mac should have distinct modus operandi. 

    I absolutely hate the new System Settings in Mac OS. I feel abused by them. Safari has gone downhill by not working correctly with many sites and if they interfere with Calculator, I may abandon Mac for good. None of these changes have been in right direction. Where is the Mac team when you need them?
    More redundant? 

    Abused? You must be spending too much time in Settings.

    Any websites not working with Safari well are the result of poor web developers, not Apple.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 27 of 36
    FaragoFarago Posts: 4member
    Settings has become a train wreck.
    It's now just a list—the blindingly obvious thing to do is to order it alphabetically.
    williamlondonkimberly
  • Reply 28 of 36
    I didn't read the whole article, but I'd guess the Settings options do not include ALPHABETIZE:  Ascending / Descending. I'd also guess that this way of ordering settings would make more sense to more people than categorizing either the way it is now or the speculated changes in the upcoming OS.
  • Reply 29 of 36
    CheeseFreezeCheeseFreeze Posts: 1,297member
    jrcw said:
    Why has Apple consistently refused to include a Install/Uninstall applications manager?
    Because the official way to install an app is to drag in into Applications and to uninstall it is to drag into the trashcan.
    Companies who deliver an installer work outside that recommended methodology.
    And because Apple wants to promote their App Store, they deliver that ‘uninstalled’ method from the store itself.
    I do agree however that a list view in Settings would help where you just select Update (App Store only) or Uninstall.

    The standard way, assuming the program is following all of the App guidelines Apple lays out, is to drag the .appbundle from the installation location (usually /Applications) to the Trash.

    There are some exceptions to this, but for the most part that's how you do it.

    The program files that get left behind in ~/Library/Application Support can also be cleaned up if you wish, but they're generally considered benign and can be ignored.

    There are uninstall helpers that make the removal of an application and all its support files much easier. So you don't have to Google for details on how to remove things. Take a look at TrashMe or AppCleaner -- both of these tools attempt to automate the search and removal of support files that go along with applications. In the case of TrashMe, it also helps you uninstall widgets and System Configuration plugins, which is handy. I personally prefer TrashMe.

    Some software integrates so deeply (MacFuSE or Growl for example) in to the system that the only way to uninstall it via a script. In these cases there is usually an uninstall script in the .dmg file that you downloaded to install the software or one provided by the developer on their website.

  • Reply 30 of 36
    kimberlykimberly Posts: 434member
    Why did it get touched in the first place? Are the muppet programers, who don't seem to have a clue anyhow wrt ux, bored or something?
    williamlondon
  • Reply 31 of 36
    kimberlykimberly Posts: 434member
    Farago said:
    Settings has become a train wreck.
    It's now just a list—the blindingly obvious thing to do is to order it alphabetically.
    Agreed
    williamlondon
  • Reply 32 of 36
    kimberlykimberly Posts: 434member
    timmillea said:
    To make the Mac forever more 'iPhone' is a terrible mistake. It makes the Mac harder to use and makes it more and more redundant. If I wanted an iPhone as my main computing device, I would just use my iPhone! The Mac should have distinct modus operandi. 

    I absolutely hate the new System Settings in Mac OS. I feel abused by them. Safari has gone downhill by not working correctly with many sites and if they interfere with Calculator, I may abandon Mac for good. None of these changes have been in right direction. Where is the Mac team when you need them?
    Absolutely agree.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 33 of 36
    kimberlykimberly Posts: 434member
    13485 said:
    dewme said:
    The Settings app has always been challenging. While Apple has made much needed improvements over several releases, it is still quite baffling and lacking a common schema or recognizable hierarchy. Are all settings organized by functionality like Connectivity, Storage, Passwords, Peripherals, etc. Yes and no. ......

    ......A great UX/UI team will always find a way to blend the user experience, look & feel, and aesthetics of an app together in a way that make sense and truly connects better with a greater number of users. 
    I share your general feelings about the organization of Settings, and it offends my delicate sensibilities of orderliness and thoughtfulness. It's irksome that Apple hasn't quite figured this out, as it wouldn't seem to take a team of geniuses to think about a structure for it. Perhaps it's because most users only go there once in a while after setup.

    Regardless, I certainly don't see any excuse for not having an immediate fix available in the next OS issue. This isn't recoding the OS.
    Agreed
    williamlondon
  • Reply 34 of 36
    kimberlykimberly Posts: 434member
    timmillea said:
    To make the Mac forever more 'iPhone' is a terrible mistake. It makes the Mac harder to use and makes it more and more redundant. If I wanted an iPhone as my main computing device, I would just use my iPhone! The Mac should have distinct modus operandi. 

    I absolutely hate the new System Settings in Mac OS. I feel abused by them. Safari has gone downhill by not working correctly with many sites and if they interfere with Calculator, I may abandon Mac for good. None of these changes have been in right direction. Where is the Mac team when you need them?
    Correct. Whoever at Apple is responsible for 'lets try to converge macOS and IOS' needs their head read.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 35 of 36
    jrcw said:
    Why has Apple consistently refused to include a Install/Uninstall applications manager?
    Because the official way to install an app is to drag in into Applications and to uninstall it is to drag into the trashcan.
    Companies who deliver an installer work outside that recommended methodology.
    And because Apple wants to promote their App Store, they deliver that ‘uninstalled’ method from the store itself.
    I do agree however that a list view in Settings would help where you just select Update (App Store only) or Uninstall.

    The standard way, assuming the program is following all of the App guidelines Apple lays out, is to drag the .appbundle from the installation location (usually /Applications) to the Trash.

    There are some exceptions to this, but for the most part that's how you do it.

    The program files that get left behind in ~/Library/Application Support can also be cleaned up if you wish, but they're generally considered benign and can be ignored.

    There are uninstall helpers that make the removal of an application and all its support files much easier. So you don't have to Google for details on how to remove things. Take a look at TrashMe or AppCleaner -- both of these tools attempt to automate the search and removal of support files that go along with applications. In the case of TrashMe, it also helps you uninstall widgets and System Configuration plugins, which is handy. I personally prefer TrashMe.

    Some software integrates so deeply (MacFuSE or Growl for example) in to the system that the only way to uninstall it via a script. In these cases there is usually an uninstall script in the .dmg file that you downloaded to install the software or one provided by the developer on their website.

    A well-written and informative comment, CheeseFreeze. In the past I used TrashMe after my go-to AppCleaner was less or completely ineffective, likely due to an incompatibility with a macOS update or conflict with other software on my machine. I now use Remove-It which is quick and efficient in removing ancillary files associated with any App. I was unaware of Apple's recommended protocols. Most of the files removed with the aforementioned "one-trick-ponies" usually seem to be quite small but having been on the Mac since 1992 and most often migrating from older machines right up to my current work-horse MBP 16 Pro Max, the build up of all these unnecessary files take up space and have the potential to cause conflict. 
    muthuk_vanalingamCheeseFreeze
  • Reply 36 of 36
    boboliciousbobolicious Posts: 1,154member
    ... I too much prefer the old settings, and in fact miss High Sierra before ads started invading the macOS, the macOS started invading us, networking became problematic and APFS made drive management a black art ...
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