12" PB Start up times

2

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 41
    dhagan4755dhagan4755 Posts: 2,150member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by niji

    go to Directory Access. Only click on as much you really need.

    for me: rendesvous; apple talk; smb.




    Yeah, that's a good starting point. I don't think that NetInfo is on by default which can cause a long delay in startup time.



    I think it's more than likely the slower hard drive in the PowerBook more than anything else.



    I still don't understand why some shut down their powerbooks when they're done using them. Unless you are:



    1. Installing RAM, Airport, or a new HD; or,

    2. Storing it for extended amount of time,



    Why bother shut down? Just put it to sleep! The time from sleep to useable is what? Two seconds?! It's a feature you can't do on Windows...and just proves how much better the Mac OS is in regards to stability...
  • Reply 22 of 41
    Quote:

    Originally posted by DHagan4755





    I still don't understand why some shut down their powerbooks when they're done using them. Unless you are:



    1. Installing RAM, Airport, or a new HD; or,

    2. Storing it for extended amount of time,



    Why bother shut down? Just put it to sleep! The time from sleep to useable is what? Two seconds?! It's a feature you can't do on Windows...and just proves how much better the Mac OS is in regards to stability...




    Well let's see,



    1) You shut down a computer to save energy. I know lots of computer people who scoff at that, but the fact remains waste is waste no matter how small. 40 million sleeping computers use a lot more power than 40 million shut down.



    2) You shut down to save wear and tear on the components of the computer. Okay sure during sleep there aren't many components that are active, but it seems to me that there is going to be some benefit to power off. My old Beige MT still roars away even when it is sleeping.



    3) There is no step 3. There is no step 3! Oh wait, there is. It is a pretty big fire hazard to leave a PB on a charger all the time. There have been problems with this in the past as we know. I guess that when you folks talk about leaving a PB sleeping all the time you mean sleeping while on the power supply.



    So is there really any reason to not shutdown my 12" PB other than simple convenience?
  • Reply 23 of 41
    overhopeoverhope Posts: 1,123member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by DaeargiMan

    I guess that when you folks talk about leaving a PB sleeping all the time you mean sleeping while on the power supply.



    Not me: charge it up, then when it's done, off I go and let it sleep as and when I'm not using it (slept by the bed last night because I'm wading through a huge PDF). Just as soon as the battery indicator goes red, out comes the charger again.
  • Reply 24 of 41
    applenutapplenut Posts: 5,768member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by DaeargiMan

    Well let's see,



    1) You shut down a computer to save energy. I know lots of computer people who scoff at that, but the fact remains waste is waste no matter how small. 40 million sleeping computers use a lot more power than 40 million shut down.



    2) You shut down to save wear and tear on the components of the computer. Okay sure during sleep there aren't many components that are active, but it seems to me that there is going to be some benefit to power off. My old Beige MT still roars away even when it is sleeping.



    3) There is no step 3. There is no step 3! Oh wait, there is. It is a pretty big fire hazard to leave a PB on a charger all the time. There have been problems with this in the past as we know. I guess that when you folks talk about leaving a PB sleeping all the time you mean sleeping while on the power supply.



    So is there really any reason to not shutdown my 12" PB other than simple convenience?




    1.) The difference is about 2-3 watts or something. 5 vs 7 total..... check the developer notes or something. And while that may "add up" in your opinion, the start up process burns uses a lot more power than waking up from sleep I would imagine and I'm sure you agree with that.



    2. Apple's UMA design and everything after was designed with the deep sleep function and therefore designed and recommended to be put to sleep at all times.
  • Reply 25 of 41
    dhagan4755dhagan4755 Posts: 2,150member
    You really can't compare an old beige G3 Mini Tower in sleep to the newer laptops and desktops which Apple makes. I have a 933 G4 tower and when PC folks come over and see the pulsating light on the studio display they say, "Oh, what's that all about?" There is no *roar* in sleep mode, it's silent. Then you touch where the light was flashing, the tower and screen come to life and the computer is ready in about 5 seconds. They're amazed. They're even more amazed when I open this laptop and it's ready to use in 1 second. The question I'm always asked immediately after I do that for the first time around a PC user is -- "Geez, that's impressive. Do you ever turn it off then?" My answer is "No."



    And it's simply silly to leave your PowerBook plugged in all the time. I work at a school which has copious amounts of Apple iBooks, and I tell people that they shouldn't leave it plugged in all the time. Charge the battery, then exercise the battery. When it comes up telling you that it's running on low memory, then plug in it and leave it plugged in until it's charge. You kill the battery by leaving it plugged in all the time and over time the capacity of the battery will be dimished even if you reset the power manager.
  • Reply 26 of 41
    fred_ljfred_lj Posts: 607member
    I've tried doing the sleep thing while taking my PowerBook home (will be in the case bout 2 hours) and sometimes it's still on, sometimes it's off. Don't know why it decides to shut down -- but sometimes it does. Weird stuff. Pismo never pulled this one on me, but it's not a big bother. Other weird things, too --- unplugging USB devices/hubs WILL wake it from sleep, but I had heard that the 10.2.5 update actually stopped this -- didn't for me. Oh well.
  • Reply 27 of 41
    overhopeoverhope Posts: 1,123member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by applenut

    the start up process burns uses a lot more power than waking up from sleep I would imagine and I'm sure you agree with that.



    Not to mention wear and tear on the hard and optical drives.
  • Reply 28 of 41
    scottscott Posts: 7,431member
    I had a thought. Check the energy saver CP and see what the settings are. I know my "power adapter" settings got stuck on "reduced" and the performance took a hit. Maybe it's trying to spin down your HD while it's trying to boot?
  • Reply 29 of 41
    overhopeoverhope Posts: 1,123member
    That's going to take some pretty contrary programming of the "Put hard disk to sleep when possible" option.



    Admittedly, the 12" PB's are pretty relentless about spinning it down (Xounds is a complete joke on these machines), but spinning it down while it's reading data, let alone before it's even got the OS loaded? I'd be surprised...
  • Reply 30 of 41
    scottscott Posts: 7,431member
    I think we can agree that OS X has/had some contrary programming from time to time. My pet peeve right now is that sleep doesn't active the screen lock when I sleep. Rather annoying when you want to shut the notebook and leave it sitting.





    Anyway I tried this. I set the 12" to have the worst performance and it booted in ... 1:26
  • Reply 31 of 41
    overhopeoverhope Posts: 1,123member
    Screen Effects is a pretty poor substitition for anything resembling security: this might have been fixed by now, but I remember reading a report about being able to send keyboard shortcuts underneath it to the OS!
  • Reply 32 of 41
    robsterrobster Posts: 256member
    My 12" PB boots in :59 seconds on the last test, not too bad, I've turned off all the stuff in Directory Services and usually set it to a no-network location prior to a restart too.



    I have a 60Gb drive in it too don't know if it's any quicker than the stock 40Gb, probably not...



    Still I'd happily have a long start-up time when you compare it to the glacial sleep/wake-up you get on a PC even in Windows XP...it really sucks! worse than OS 9 by a long way.
  • Reply 33 of 41
    overhopeoverhope Posts: 1,123member
    Agreed: I used to have a Win 95 laptop that took a full ten minutes to wake from hibernation. Quicker to reboot it...
  • Reply 34 of 41
    scottscott Posts: 7,431member
    Although sleep is the better option a 5 minute boot time still means the notebook is doing something wrong.
  • Reply 35 of 41
    alcimedesalcimedes Posts: 5,486member
    original poster said it took him 1:20, not 5:00.



    it just feels like 5:00.
  • Reply 36 of 41
    scottscott Posts: 7,431member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by alcimedes

    original poster said it took him 1:20, not 5:00.



    it just feels like 5:00.




    oh



    I thought this was turning into one of those threads where some posts a problem and then the mac faithful suggest a work around rather than address the problem.
  • Reply 37 of 41
    cesarocesaro Posts: 10member
    Scott: Thanks for the concern on addressing my original problem!



    I understand that there are a variety of possible factors that could influence any start up for a system. However I'm not sure that we have been able to address my question of the start up lag of a system with the same or better (faster) hardware than another with the same OS X 10.2.5 and settings. Namely 12" PowerBook compared to an iMac (Classic) G3. The hard drive is a popular candidate 5400 RPM for the iMac and 4200 RPM for the 12" PowerBook however the PB uses ATA/100 and I thought the iMac ATA/66? Hmm I'm not sure maybe someone could clarify. Would this make a difference eitherway?
  • Reply 38 of 41
    kraig911kraig911 Posts: 912member
    ok my 15 PB takes about 2:30 to start up I use DHCP and have windows and reg file sharing turned on tho under sharing would that be why? also on the battery is it really bad to have it plugged in all the time? See I use mine at work 8 hours a day at the office on the charger with the battery plugged in, should I just take it out to use it that way?



    Craig
  • Reply 39 of 41
    paulpaul Posts: 5,278member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by DHagan4755

    And it's simply silly to leave your PowerBook plugged in all the time. I work at a school which has copious amounts of Apple iBooks, and I tell people that they shouldn't leave it plugged in all the time. Charge the battery, then exercise the battery. When it comes up telling you that it's running on low memory, then plug in it and leave it plugged in until it's charge. You kill the battery by leaving it plugged in all the time and over time the capacity of the battery will be dimished even if you reset the power manager.



    are you sure about this?

    I figured if it is plugged in with a full battery it would bypass the battery altogether and therefore use the battery less, making it useful longer... why is this faulty logic? What if i disconnected a full battery when i am plugged in?
  • Reply 40 of 41
    augustwestaugustwest Posts: 157member
    I hate to revive this thread with a stupid question:



    Are people here generally recommending that this is the best method to use your computer:



    1. for an ibook running osx, charge my ibook battery, leave it on in sleep mode, unplug the charger, and use the ibook that way until the battery low warning, then recharge it fully and repeat the process, even if the computer is in "sleep" during human sleeping hours (middle of the night).



    2. for a desktop running osx, leave it in sleep mode all the time, unless prompted to reboot or every few weeks or so?



    I had no idea about this, and I feel stupid! I've been rebooting my laptop every time I use it, and it seems like the reboot process uses up alot of battery energy in and of itself!



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