Digital Camera question...

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
I'm looking to upgrade my old Kodak DC260 camera.

I want one that handles action shots the best and with:

RAW format, I'll be using Photoshop to work on them

OS X friendly

and a nice lens



under $1000? anyone have one they recommend buying?



thanks in advance

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 20
    I like the mid-size Canon PowerShots like the A80.



    But there are lots of good opinions on these boards, for example look at these threads
  • Reply 2 of 20
    Canon Digital Rebel or Nikon D70..



    I have a Dreb, and its fine... love it to death.





    PS CS opens the Canon's RAW files flawlessly.
  • Reply 3 of 20
    progmacprogmac Posts: 1,850member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by MacChadilac

    I'm looking to upgrade my old Kodak DC260 camera.

    I want one that handles action shots the best and with:

    RAW format, I'll be using Photoshop to work on them

    OS X friendly

    and a nice lens



    under $1000? anyone have one they recommend buying?



    thanks in advance




    I'll second the recommendation for a digital rebel. It takes the best digital photographs I have ever seen.
  • Reply 4 of 20
    meecesmeeces Posts: 160member
    I have to say though, what kind of action? Because even the Digital Rebel can miss things. I don't remember what it's sustained shot capacity is, but might be a good idea to check the specs. For price, anyone know about the Canon 8mp camera that just came out with integrated lens?

    -Matt
  • Reply 5 of 20
    meecesmeeces Posts: 160member
    And just realized that camera is covered in all the other links posted. Oops.
  • Reply 6 of 20
    fred_ljfred_lj Posts: 607member
    I also have a digital camera question that I'll post in here to save a new thread from clogging the boards. I am going to be studying in Germany for this coming fall semester, and this means --- of course! --- lots of opportunities to see Europe (there are some people where I work that won't let me come back unless I visit Italy --- whole lab full of native Italians).



    I've read some other discussions about the "right" camera for travel, but it's silly mostly --- pros who are traveling just to take pictures for the most part. What unit have you all used successfully that is both compact (inobtrusive, somewhat inconspicuous), full-featured, and reliably *tough* when it comes to travelling?
  • Reply 7 of 20
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,664member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by fred_lj

    I also have a digital camera question that I'll post in here to save a new thread from clogging the boards. I am going to be studying in Germany for this coming fall semester, and this means --- of course! --- lots of opportunities to see Europe (there are some people where I work that won't let me come back unless I visit Italy --- whole lab full of native Italians).



    I've read some other discussions about the "right" camera for travel, but it's silly mostly --- pros who are traveling just to take pictures for the most part. What unit have you all used successfully that is both compact (inobtrusive, somewhat inconspicuous), full-featured, and reliably *tough* when it comes to travelling?




    Hmmm....



    I'm gonna have to go with the Canon S50. 5M pixel, black metal case, sliding door for lens protection, nice feature set, about the size of a pack of cigs and can be had for around $350 (less is you get it on line).



    Takes great pictures and has a nice solid feel.
  • Reply 8 of 20
    escherescher Posts: 1,811member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by fred_lj

    What unit have you all used successfully that is both compact (inobtrusive, somewhat inconspicuous), full-featured, and reliably *tough* when it comes to travelling?



    fred_lj: I have used a Canon PowerShot A20 for several years. I've used it successfully on many trips, both in the US and in Europe (including Germany and Italy, where you plan to go ). It has never let me down. It runs on AA batteries, including rechargeable ones, which is super convenient if you're in a pinch. It's not too small and not too big, very robust. Just perfect.



    The A60, its 2MP successor model, or the A70/75, its 3MP successor model will perform even better, while retaining the AA battery advantage.



    Escher
  • Reply 9 of 20
    The new cameras are fading away from AA battery use.. correct?



    I've been told the lithium batteries are the way to go.. I guess as long as you have an extra one.
  • Reply 10 of 20
  • Reply 12 of 20
    telomartelomar Posts: 1,804member
    I'd encourage you to look at the Olympus C-770, C-765 or C-750. All three are quite nice.
  • Reply 13 of 20
    Can someone explain the difference between a regular digital camera and a digital SLR camera? Are these the only two types of digital cameras?
  • Reply 14 of 20
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Jim Paradise

    Can someone explain the difference between a regular digital camera and a digital SLR camera? Are these the only two types of digital cameras?



    Jim,



    'regular' digital cameras (sometimes known as 'digicams') are all in on, i.e., they have the lens built in to the body (e.g. Canon S500). Technically, I would also include 'prosumer' camera in this group, as they have the lens built in (e.g. Sony F828.). Typically, they have either a separate optical viewfinder, or an electronic viewfinder.



    'digital SLR' cameras are the same as their film counterparts - they have detatchable lenses, and use a mirror/pentaprism (or mirror/pentamirror in the case of the Canon 300D / Digital Rebel) design so that you see through the main lens. Examples include the Nikon D70, Canon 1D MK2, Fuji S2 Pro etc.



    Hope this helps a bit. If not, have a look at some of the sites below:



    www.dcresource.com

    www.dpreview.com

    www.steves-digicams.com



    Cheers,



    Dave.
  • Reply 15 of 20
    macworkmacwork Posts: 57member
    Quote:



    WOW.. this company sucks big time.

    Thank you for the tip, you saved me a bunch of heartache from what it seems

    I appreciate it
  • Reply 16 of 20
    fred_ljfred_lj Posts: 607member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Telomar

    I'd encourage you to look at the Olympus C-770, C-765 or C-750. All three are quite nice.



    Wow, pretty hefty price tags on those. From what I used of the early Camedia series, they didn't seem very well constructed at all. Have things gotten better on that end?



    Yeah, dSLRs are the way to go if you can afford it and already have lenses in one camp or another. I LOVE my big DCS 620 (the F5 body is unbeatable), but I'm afraid hauling it around overseas with my bag of lenses/flash is not going to be easy at all. I want to enjoy the trip at the same time, ya know?



    What do you guys know about the latest mid-upper range consumer offerings from Fuji and Nikon? I know there are other brands that make great P&S digitals, but I've been able to trust Nikon for a long time to give expected, controlled results (still have a Coolpix 950).



    edit: to give you an idea of a dSLR's favorability ---- I really don't know if a P&S digicam could have been able to capture the scenes below; the excellent 35mm framework of many of these cams leads to 2nd-to-none metering, and you have a much, much bigger sensor to capture the scene on (which results in more natural pictures).











  • Reply 17 of 20
    copelandcopeland Posts: 298member
    If you can afford it go for the Digital Rebel. Best digital Camera I ever used (it's also the most expensive one). If the price tag drops a bit I will get the DR too.



    copeland
  • Reply 18 of 20
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Dave Abrey

    Jim,



    'regular' digital cameras (sometimes known as 'digicams') are all in on, i.e., they have the lens built in to the body (e.g. Canon S500). Technically, I would also include 'prosumer' camera in this group, as they have the lens built in (e.g. Sony F828.). Typically, they have either a separate optical viewfinder, or an electronic viewfinder.



    'digital SLR' cameras are the same as their film counterparts - they have detatchable lenses, and use a mirror/pentaprism (or mirror/pentamirror in the case of the Canon 300D / Digital Rebel) design so that you see through the main lens. Examples include the Nikon D70, Canon 1D MK2, Fuji S2 Pro etc.



    Hope this helps a bit. If not, have a look at some of the sites below:



    www.dcresource.com

    www.dpreview.com

    www.steves-digicams.com



    Cheers,



    Dave.




    Thanks! That's pretty much what my guess was, but with more info on SLR cameras which is what I was looking for.
  • Reply 19 of 20
    pbg4 dudepbg4 dude Posts: 1,611member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by MacChadilac

    The new cameras are fading away from AA battery use.. correct?



    I've been told the lithium batteries are the way to go.. I guess as long as you have an extra one.




    The lithium battery in my Digital Rebel will last between 350 & 500 shots, depending on how much I use the flash, how much previewing I do, etc.



    I'd have to dump my flash card a few times before I had to recharge the battery.
  • Reply 20 of 20
    fred_ljfred_lj Posts: 607member
    I've a question for Nikon D70 owners or people that know....I think I remember reading somewhere that with the D70, support for D-TTL metering with the SB-80DX, SB-28DX is no longer present. Instead it uses this new "creative lighting" system with the SB-800 (is that the right newest model speedlight). I'm really thinking hard about just saving up for a D70 for travel...there's just too much given up with a fixed-lens point and shoot camera. But if it doesn't support my speedlight completely....meh, it may not even be an issue as long as I could still use auto aperture mode on the flash.
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