GDB:Visionary

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
Look at what is happening. Free Iraq has a vision for the future that would have been impossible without the forceful ouster of SH. The people are still leery, but they are hopeful. They want a good life for themselves and their families. Although the average Iraqi did not like being under American control, they are not anti-American terrorists. Iraq has a bright future and its developing democracy will be a challenge for the rest of the middle east. Don?t doubt if you someday see statues honoring GDB in downtown Baghdad.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 26
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 17,926member
    Perhaps you mean GWB?



    Edit: I see the flamethrowers out there, so I'm leaving this thread now.





  • Reply 2 of 26
    ericgericg Posts: 135member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Common Man

    ..............Don?t doubt if you someday see statues honoring GDB in downtown Baghdad.



    If the situation in Iraq improves for the better, maybe.... but for now
  • Reply 3 of 26
    shetlineshetline Posts: 4,695member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by SDW2001

    Perhaps you mean GWB?



    No, it's 'D' as is 'Dubya'... everyone knows that!



    "Common Man" is obviously an annoying troll. I just can't figure out if he's stupid enough to really think the President's initials are GDB, or if this spelling is the faux stupidity of a "Common Man" parody character that a troll is creating.
  • Reply 4 of 26
    GWB . It was early .



    The point here is that good things are happening in Iraq despite the gloom and doom of the left and the main stream media. Operation Iraq is working! I am not blind to the problems . The wounds are deep in war-torn Iraq and some scars will never go away. Iraq does, however, now have a chance to become a strong, proud, free and wealthy nation. This would not have happened without the removal of SH and he was not going to go easily. His sons were standing in line to take over upon anything short of what the coalition did. Iraq was doomed to SH-like rule indefinitely. Despite the scars, Iraq is moving forward. SH will be tried. The markets will continue to welcome Iraq and jobs will be created and people will have opportunity. The Iraq Gov. will deal with the terrorists, of this I am confident. Iraq will become a safe, prosperous and model Islamic nation.



    Conservatives are not blind to the problems. We see them. In contrast to the left, however, our view of what is good is not blocked by unconditional hatred for the President.
  • Reply 5 of 26
    giantgiant Posts: 6,041member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by shetline

    I just can't figure out if he's stupid enough to really think the President's initials are GDB, or if this spelling is the faux stupidity of a "Common Man" parody character that a troll is creating.



  • Reply 6 of 26
    sammi josammi jo Posts: 4,634member
    Quote:

    Iraq will become a safe, prosperous and model Islamic nation.]



    Islamic nation. Hmmm.. Like Saudi Arabia huh?



    What if Iraq decides in future, under their own sovereignty and democratic elections, that their economy be kickstarted by taking control and establishing national public ownership of their massive oil reserves, and using those petro-dollars (or petro-euros?) to rebuild their trashed public infrastructure, public programs such as schools, education, health care, etc etc, for the benefit of the Iraqi people as opposed to enriching US oil and oil service interests?



    You only have to go back as far as 53 years ago, when Mohammed Mossadegh of Iran decided to nationalize Iran's oil industry and the powerful British owned Anglo-Iranian Oil Company was put out of the loop. Guess what happened? Naval blockades, sanctions, economic hardship for Iranians, followed by a US-CIA backed coup. Yes, we decided to kick out a democratically elected leader and install a corporate friendly, terminally corrupt, puppet dictator, the Shah.



    If the Iraqi people decide that their oil belongs to them, and took steps to direct their oil riches towards their own nation, all the US would need to do is briefly impose martial law and re-take control of Iraq's oil facilities by military force. Another expensive invasion from the US would be unnecessary as we are building 14 large permanent military bases in Iraq as we speak. Iraq is finished as an independent nation. It's over. If they want true independence, they will have to WAIT until their oil reserves run dry.
  • Reply 7 of 26
    jubelumjubelum Posts: 4,490member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by sammi jo

    If they want true independence, they will have to WAIT until their oil reserves run dry. [/B]



    Calling Dr. Cynic... Dr. Cynic, please report to the polls...
  • Reply 8 of 26
    frank777frank777 Posts: 5,839member
    Typical SJO.



    While I usually stay out of Bush flame fests, I thought it worth noting that after the US freed Kuwait from Iraq in Gulf War 1.0, the US asked Kuwait to open its oil sector to US investment.



    Kuwait said no and their oil fields and refineries are still their own.

    I can't really see the Iraqi situation being much different.
  • Reply 9 of 26
    pfflampfflam Posts: 5,053member
    'Visions' have been the root of more historical horrors that you can count . .



    G-d help us escape Wolfowitz's and Bush's 'Vision' . . .
  • Reply 10 of 26
    wrong robotwrong robot Posts: 3,907member




    What a visionary!







    ziiing!















    yes, I know the photo is a joke, so is this post
  • Reply 11 of 26
    shawnjshawnj Posts: 6,656member
    I would say his policies are more "delusionary," since he misjudged just about everything and gotten just about everything wrong.
  • Reply 12 of 26
    giantgiant Posts: 6,041member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Frank777

    While I usually stay out of Bush flame fests, I thought it worth noting that after the US freed Kuwait from Iraq in Gulf War 1.0, the US asked Kuwait to open its oil sector to US investment.



    Kuwait said no and their oil fields and refineries are still their own.




    But foreign companies are heavily involved, particularly texaco which operates many onshore and offshore fields.



    Really, the whole oil business is very, very complex, so it's not really a good idea to make big generalizations.
  • Reply 13 of 26
    sammi josammi jo Posts: 4,634member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Frank777

    Typical SJO.



    While I usually stay out of Bush flame fests, I thought it worth noting that after the US freed Kuwait from Iraq in Gulf War 1.0, the US asked Kuwait to open its oil sector to US investment.



    Kuwait said no and their oil fields and refineries are still their own.

    I can't really see the Iraqi situation being much different.




    It is very different. Kuwait is not a democracy and never has been. It is is a "constitutional monarchy" with a horrendous human rights record. Kuwait is a tiny nation that just happens to own 10% of the world's oil reserves, and everything they have done in the past has been within what the US will tolerate. They have no choice in the matter.
  • Reply 14 of 26
    sammi josammi jo Posts: 4,634member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Jubelum

    Calling Dr. Cynic... Dr. Cynic, please report to the polls...



    Cynic, yes I admit. But isn't it be best to recognize that realism, however harsh, is more appropriate than being a pollyanna? Expecting good things to happen when people with zero moral conscience are in charge will means eternal disappointment. Who in their right minds wants the Iraqi people, after all the crap they've been through, first with Hussein and now with the occupation, to be full of false expectations?
  • Reply 15 of 26
    shawnjshawnj Posts: 6,656member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Common Man

    In contrast to the left, however, our view of what is good is not blocked by unconditional hatred for the President.



    No, it's entirely conditional "hatred" of the president's policies-- along with a bit of disgust for the intelligence of the man himself.
  • Reply 16 of 26
    sammi jo is spot on here...as long as the mid east is the main source for a commodity that the west craves, the people who live there are going to be subject to the same kind of shit they've had to deal with for the last 60 years.
  • Reply 17 of 26
    brussellbrussell Posts: 9,812member
    From now on, George Doubleu Bush will forever be known in AppleOutsider as "GDB."
  • Reply 18 of 26
    aquaticaquatic Posts: 5,602member
    Common Man are you really a separate entity or just someone here's joke?
  • Reply 19 of 26
    crazychestercrazychester Posts: 1,339member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by kneelbeforezod

    sammi jo is spot on here...as long as the mid east is the main source for a commodity that the west craves, the people who live there are going to be subject to the same kind of shit they've had to deal with for the last 60 years.



    .....and terrorism will continue to proliferate.



    What bugs me most is adherence to the notion that you can just plonk democracy down anywhere and it will work.



    Cons, ever noticed that democracy exists primarily in first world countries and that it is a far rarer thing in the third world?



    No. I didn't think so.
  • Reply 20 of 26
    andersanders Posts: 6,523member
    In other news today: Clinton voted the most moral president ever.
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