iTunes-like Microsoft music store due this week

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 33
    rolandgrolandg Posts: 632member
    Links to pictures 2 through 5 seem to be broken... maybe the server was shut down due to high traffic. Are there any known mirrors?
  • Reply 22 of 33
    messiahtoshmessiahtosh Posts: 1,754member
    MSNBC had a story on this that was slanted in Apple's favor, surprisingly. They called the legal online download business, "iTunes and the 7 dwarfs."
  • Reply 23 of 33
    gavrielgavriel Posts: 175member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Messiahtosh

    They called the legal online download business, "iTunes and the 7 dwarfs."



    That's an instant classic.
  • Reply 24 of 33
    sjksjk Posts: 603member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by MacsRGood4U

    Why does the Napster logo appear on the Microsoft screens posted by A.I.?



    I wondered about that, too. It doesn't show up in Microsoft Windows Media - Sleek New Design screenshots. Was it Photoshop'd in (the .uk site's not responding so I can't look at the shots more closely)? Or hmurchison may want to retract his "Microsoft is going to kill napster" comment.
  • Reply 25 of 33
    stevesteve Posts: 523member
    It wasn't Photoshopped in. WMP10 lets you browse music stores from within the player. In this case, the Napster store is the one enabled.
  • Reply 26 of 33
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,354member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Steve

    It wasn't Photoshopped in. WMP10 lets you browse music stores from within the player. In this case, the Napster store is the one enabled.





    With a 90% duplication of songs the idea of browsing stores is decidely microsoftian and banal. Exclusive content is generally rare and not too desirable.
  • Reply 27 of 33
    ajmasajmas Posts: 590member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by hmurchison

    With a 90% duplication of songs the idea of browsing stores is decidely microsoftian and banal. Exclusive content is generally rare and not too desirable.



    Exclusive content is probably rare, but its not what's important. When you walk down the street you get to buy your music from any number of stores, whether it be for price, service or trust. Why should it be any different on line?
  • Reply 28 of 33
    Is the Microsoft music store up and running? The week has come and gone.
  • Reply 29 of 33
    Quote:

    Originally posted by kim kap sol

    Is the Microsoft music store up and running? The week has come and gone.



    I was wondering the same thing. I'm too lazy to turn on my XP box.
  • Reply 30 of 33
    Quote:

    Originally posted by ibook911

    I was wondering the same thing. I'm too lazy to turn on my XP box.



    Heck...I though SP2 was supposed to come out on automatic update...has that happened?
  • Reply 31 of 33
    amorphamorph Posts: 7,112member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by ajmas

    Exclusive content is probably rare, but its not what's important. When you walk down the street you get to buy your music from any number of stores, whether it be for price, service or trust. Why should it be any different on line?



    First, because an online store can have everything in their catalog "in stock" so things like physical store size don't matter. Second, because every online store is as close every other, so location doesn't matter. So, two of the most crucial variables in retail are moot.



    What about the last one? Well, brand only goes so far. The Microsoft stores all license exactly the same back end (so except for the most trivial cosmetic differences, the shopping experiences will be interchangeable), they'll probably wind up with exactly the same catalog (or close enough as no matter), the same DRM (too restrictive), the same file format (WMP), and since they're identical in every other respect, the prices will probably end up the same, too. I shouldn't even use the future tense. This is already true. That moots a third crucial variable in retail: Specialization; or if you prefer, "brand identity."



    Why did iTMS succeed? Because Apple didn't just license some other solution, put lipstick on it, and push it out the door. They busted their asses working on everything from the presentation of the site to how it's accessed (through iTunes, not through a browser) to the DRM (liberal, and uniform, so you don't get too many nasty surprises using the music you've licensed), etc. Microsoft is hoping that a large number of what amount to commodity stores will overwhelm one really good store, and they're probably evoking the PC metaphor to justify it. But you know what? The exact subset of the PC market that most closely mirrors this model — the low end — is brutal and unprofitable. Any number of would-be competitors, including huge brands like IBM, have bailed out, and consumers have shown no brand loyalty at all - hardly surprising, given that the only substantive differences between the machines are the logo and a few bits of plastic. If it weren't for the top-down, socialist enterprise market, and MS riding IBM's coattails into that market, the PC hardware market might look a lot different today. Since the music-store market is in the more democratic consumer market, I don't see how this approach will get anywhere.



    So what will happen? The Microsoft-allied stores, forced into the same interface, will all compete for the same slice of the pie, whose size will be determined by the quality of the WMP 10 user interface, which is completely out of their control (just as the interchangeability of low-end PCs is due to the hardware standards enforced by the commodity market, which are beyond any vendor's control). I expect the same thing to happen to these stores to happen to the Microsoft allies: They'll eat each other, until maybe one or two remain, and if MS has carved out enough of the overall pie to allow them to remain profitable, they'll soldier along. If not, they'll die.



    Their entire strategy is built around contempt for the consumer. They assume that you can bamboozle them with "branding" instead of doing the work involved in offering real, substantive choices.



    Locally, every music store in town has a specialty. There have been chains that offered the same catalogs in the same size store, and all but one is gone. Why? Because if consumers are going to have to make a decision, they'd like it to be a meaningful and substantive decision, and they'd like the choices to be quality.
  • Reply 32 of 33
    Damn it looks so ugly. I'm so glad there's iTunes.
  • Reply 33 of 33
    ibook911ibook911 Posts: 607member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by kim kap sol

    Heck...I though SP2 was supposed to come out on automatic update...has that happened?



    I don't know. I downloaded it three weeks ago. Microsoft had a site for IT professionals or something, so I just downloaded it from there. I put it on two machines. They wanted regular consumers to wait for the Windows Update to give it to them, but I didn't want to wait.
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