Rumors of new Panny and JVC HD camcorders

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited January 2014
The infamous "messageboard" post



Quote:

I just had chanc talk to a friend who work with Panasonic on software develop for there new camera that they will show at NAB in April 2005. He told secret. Here is but no friend name or he's in big trouble.



The new Panasonic camera will have three 1/3" CCD. It will have 50 Mbps and 25 Mbps modes. The 50 Mbps mode will record to a pack with SD cards. Panasonic developed the SD cards and licenced to everyone and beat Sony in acceptance of Memory Stick. The future flash memory cards will be SD and Memory Stick, having the major market share, with SD leading. CF market share will drop. The other cards will just die out.



The 50 Mbps record will be for DVCPRO-HD, which will be 720/24-30p. There will not have 60p like Varicam. The 50 Mbps will record too DVCPRO50.



There will have also 25 Mbps and will be MPEG2 720p and DVCPRO.



The camera compete to Sony Z1. It too have 1080i interpolate from 720p.



The camera record in 720p 960x720 pixel, 4:2:2, compres about 6.6 or 6.8:1, don't remember exact. The quallity similar to Varicam but no such low light quality, no slow motion, no so much audio channel, no such good lens.



The quality nearly as good as Z1 in CF25, but significant less in 1080i.



The camera popular to indipendent filmmakers. The main advantag is it does not have the dropout problem of the Z1 when record to SD card. It can also used for broadcast, they accept DVCPRO50 and some accept 720p. The problem the SD flash memory very expensive because gigabite cards need, and the time record limited, need to dump to computer or sent over satelit to station. Advantage over XDCAM is the sent much faster. You read the SD card a lot quicker than an optical disc.



There will also be two new JVC HDV 720p camera at NAB, one 3 1/3" CCD compete to Z1 CF25, but no as good and other better than Z1, with three 2/3" CCD. It will have excellent lens available, true HD but also can use new lot less expensive HD lens that will available.



Panasonic will release information before NAB, and so will release JVC.



There will be more surprise at NAB. A lot of move to optical HD record with blue violet laser. 2005 NAB will be all about HD. From this year most production move to HD because the futur is HD and the material must be good to show at HD in futur. No buy SD camera anymor, only for news and if your material is short life.



Panasonic and JVC have 1080p in 2008. Sony have 2160p, also this year F950 with built in record. Sony will also new 50 Mbps 4:2:2 MPEG2 HD XDCAM with same quality as HDCAM but less money.



I know some more but can't tell. If you need reliable HD camera that does not cost much, and you can't liv with the dropout possible with the Z1, the Panasonic is for you. I think most professional will buy the Panasonic because that. I recommmend. For indie filmmker making features the Z1 in CF25 better choice.



Interesting. I'm pretty sure Panny will hope into the low cost HD fray. It won't be HDV as they aren't a member of the HDV consortium. I'm eager to see what they can do with a low cost DVC Pro cam.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 10
    I am still waiting for Canon's successor to the GL2 (GL3?) and have high hopes it will be HD, unlike it's big brother, the XL2 which is still SD.
  • Reply 2 of 10
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Bill M

    I am still waiting for Canon's successor to the GL2 (GL3?) and have high hopes it will be HD, unlike it's big brother, the XL2 which is still SD.



    Bill I do know that Canon has stated that the XL2 is their "last" SD camera so I wait for the "HD" GL3 as well. Here's hoping NAB 2005 is the debut.
  • Reply 3 of 10
    nevermind
  • Reply 4 of 10
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,273member
    I like these points:





    Quote:

    The 50 Mbps record will be for DVCPRO-HD, which will be 720/24-30p. There will not have 60p like Varicam. The 50 Mbps will record too DVCPRO50.



    720p/24-30 @ 50MBPS is NICE. That's twice the datarate of the HDV spec. Should result in a great picture. MiniDV tapes are cheap now I'd have no problem recording 30 minutes on a 60 minute tape with this quality.



    Quote:

    There will be more surprise at NAB. A lot of move to optical HD record with blue violet laser. 2005 NAB will be all about HD. From this year most production move to HD because the futur is HD and the material must be good to show at HD in futur



    I'm not too jazzed about moving to an optical medium. This smacks of japanese companies trying to push their homegrown tech when it doesn't make the most sense. HDs are getting very cheap and large. It's only a matter of time before we move to HD based systems that allow you to edit right in the camera itself.



    Right now we have plenty of resolution but the color still sucks. I believe HDV is either 4.1.1 or 4.2.0. Resolution only gets you so far. A Dir of Photographer is likely more keen on color and shadow details that overall resolution.



    Once consumers saw the difference they'd probably agree.
  • Reply 5 of 10
    Quote:

    Originally posted by hmurchison

    It's only a matter of time before we move to HD based systems that allow you to edit right in the camera itself.





    ugh that'd be awful. thats one of those features wal-mart would promote the hell out of to attract uninformed consumers. editing on a camera would be like cooking a dinner with all the ingredients still inside their packages.
  • Reply 6 of 10
    Quote:

    Originally posted by ipodandimac

    ugh that'd be awful. thats one of those features wal-mart would promote the hell out of to attract uninformed consumers. editing on a camera would be like cooking a dinner with all the ingredients still inside their packages.



    I sorta agree that editing the actual stuff on a camera would not be useful. Sure someone might save a few seconds here and there, but in the end you would end up with a complicated interface with a lot of buttons and confusing menus.



    I say let cameras do what there supposed to do...record stuff.
  • Reply 7 of 10
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,273member
    When I say "editing video in the camera" I don't mean something cheesy like the effects you see in the camera the like. What I mean is really pretty simple, you'd hook the camera up via FW like normal but instead of transferring the data to your computer for editing your computer would simply treat the in-camera drive like normal. The advantage of this would be speed in editing for some workflows.



    I also would love to see drives encased into removable housings that can be taken to the editing bay, attached and edited. Thus you could keep the camera in use while you ingested or edited new video.



    Hard drives and their ability to be hotswapped are a boon over slower tech like optical. I'm not really worried that they will take off because kinetta.com is already laying the groundwork by marrying a good lens system with a great sensor and wicked fast storage. His system runs 60k but in 5 years this same technology could be below 10k. His camera records 4.4.4 uncompressed video. You can't get that type of quality for under 100k



    In the meantime I'll glady accept Panny's HD and JVCs HDV cameras.
  • Reply 8 of 10
    Quote:

    Originally posted by hmurchison

    I also would love to see drives encased into removable housings that can be taken to the editing bay, attached and edited. Thus you could keep the camera in use while you ingested or edited new video.



    there are already "firestore" drives that let you record straight to hard drive.
  • Reply 9 of 10
    pfflampfflam Posts: 5,053member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by ipodandimac

    ugh that'd be awful. thats one of those features wal-mart would promote the hell out of to attract uninformed consumers. editing on a camera would be like cooking a dinner with all the ingredients still inside their packages.



    I agree its awful . . . Anyone who shoots alot of footage and is serious about what they shoot, like say, artists and independant film makers (non-commercial) want to keep it all, all of the footage that they shoot . . . I have libraries of Tapes and Disks . . . I don't want to have to transfer all of my raw footage just to be able to store my stuff.



    It also seems to garantee a limited set of options . . . could you imagine trying to 'edit' a serious work on a camera?!?!

    What would you have Final Cut Pro in there?!
  • Reply 10 of 10
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,273member
    The problem with tape is that while you have everything stored after recording. If you want to use your data your tapes need to be logged and batch captured again. Tape only allows for realtime ingestion. That's not cool.



    I'm aware of the bulky Firestore solutions but they are insufficient in speed. The Kinetta camera records uncompressed video in 4.4.4. That requires massive throughput which Firewire cannot currently muster.



    I would propose that eventually, like some high end still cameras, there would be "Digital Backs" that clip onto the lens/sensor assembly to complete the camera. Thus when you fill up one drive assembly you simply just attach another and keep recording. The unattached drive assembly could be then hooked up to the editing station and edits commence. No slow tape ingesting and using a SAN multiple editors could work simultaneously.



    Ever notice how the NFL telecasts can get up to the minute montages of plays that happened just minutes ago. It's because they cut out the slowest parts of the chain. The ingesting.
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