I WANT a Powermac G5 but I don't know if I need

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited January 2014
Im a hardcore Windows user. I have been playing around with Windows computer since I was 7. So finally, ever since Steve Jobs decided to start making Apple so damn flashy and cool I have wanted one of those beautifull Powermacs. But my question is what is a powermac really for. I don't do graphics or video or any of that stuff. But I have wanted a powerfull PC desktop for a while. Should I drop all that cash to get the powermac even though Im not a profesional user. The most the computer could see is mathematica software and a demanding game. But that is prety much it. By the way I have died for a powermac every since I saw the green i believe G3. Also what computer would be better for me if the powermac is not ideal. Im seriously very lost. Thanks
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 27
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,216member
    Hey you could always buy a Mac mini and get yourself acclimated to the OS. Then when you're ready to drop some serious coinage the Intel Powermacs will be ready. This allows a l33t guy like yourself the possible ability to run both Mac OS X and Windows Vista on the same computer.



    Imagine that...all the cool Apple apps from Omnigroup and Apple and others without losing the ability to run Microsoft's pride and joy natively.
  • Reply 2 of 27
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    Hardcore Windows user huh, you're a dirty bird aren't yea. I have to agree with hmurchison on this, I would wait for the Intel models to start dabbling in the world of a Powermac but that means you're going to have to wait a year. So in the mean time the iMini would get your feet wet in the world of Mac but please realize that it is at the bottom of the food chain. Meaning as a Powermac user myself I would rather get kicked in the nuts then use a iMini for anything related to computing, take that statement as you will but once you go Power you'll never go back. If your really yearning for one now grab one from eBay, a Dual 2 GHz would treat your right.
  • Reply 3 of 27
    Thanks for the comments. The mini seems a bit too underpowered even for me. I mean how much computer can they give your for 500 dollars. Is there really going to be a big difference to wait for an intel chip.
  • Reply 4 of 27
    pbpb Posts: 4,232member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by antartican

    The mini seems a bit too underpowered even for me. I mean how much computer can they give your for 500 dollars.



    Not too much if your intention is to run demanding games. But in uses other than that, and since you say you are not going to do graphics and video, a Mac mini is just fine. In short, the mini will perform well in tasks that are not too heavy to the CPU and GPU.



    Also, this CPU comparison may be useful to your decision. Although it seems about right in a first sight, I don't know how true it is.
  • Reply 5 of 27
    i bought a new dual-core 2.0ghz powermac to replace my windows desktop last week. i would not consider myself a power user. i surf the net, check email, play a game or two every now and then...you know, the basic stuff. every so often, i will stream a live set from my turntables when i am dj'ing. or i might backup some dvd's that i own for future use. but in no way would i say i am using my powermac to its fullest potential.



    i bought my powermac because it is an ultra sleek sexy machine. i believe it will also last much longer than a mac mini or imac due to that fact that you can upgrade it more easily. that, and it's just plain cool.



    i also bought a new 17" powerbook last week. it is awesome. i love the power pc line of mac. i don't really care for the consumer line. white never really has settled with me.



    if i were you, i would buy the powermac. you will not regret it.
  • Reply 6 of 27
    errr, wouldnt it depend on if he has enough money to do so? I say get the mac mini, find out what OSX is all about, bearing in mind the speed is not going to be all there. Then when the Intel powermacs come along, assuming you can install Windows on it, you could have one box that runs both (should you really need that nasty Windows hit on occation...)
  • Reply 7 of 27
    slugheadslughead Posts: 1,169member
    I could never convince myself to buy a non powermac Apple. Maybe one of the laptops but never a mac mini or iMac.



    Almost all of the macs I've owned have been powermacs, and they've all been heavily modified from the stock config, a couple have bigtime case mods and extra parts that make life worth living.



    I just can't see myself being stuck with an iMac, especially. I think they run too hot and there's not a whole lot you can do to them to trick them out after you buy them.



    Your mac will be with you a long time, might as well make it one you can live with for that long.



    my current config:

    DP G5 2.5ghz

    10kRPM 80GB (boot drive)

    160GB internal seagate (stock drive)

    Superdrive with region-free firmware

    600GB External SATA RAID-0

    GeForce 6800 Ultra (aftermarket) powering 2 CRT monitors

    Radeon 9200 PCI powering 1 CRT monitor

    ElGato EyeTV 200 (makes my mac a TiVo)

    2.5GB RAM, 2 Gigs of it being aftermarket

    Logitech MX1000 Mouse (*)

    Logitech Mouseman Dual Optical

    Logitech Elite keyboard (*)

    Standard Apple keyboard



    (*) these are hooked to a KVM, the other keyboard and mouse are there so I can use both my mac and x86 PC at the same time



    You guessed it, I use my machine solely to look at porn.
  • Reply 8 of 27
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,216member
    "Just" a 10k drive? Slacker! :P
  • Reply 9 of 27
    Yeah the Powermacs are a bit expensive especially for today's desktop prices. But just like the dj I want one just because they are such incredibly sexy machines. Im thinking of probably getting one on Ebay. Oh by the way are the apple lcds worth it. I think there are sharper screens on the market especially for that price. But im a sucker for a preety face. Damn windows crashed just a minute ago. I swear.

    Ps. Is there a big difference bewteen dual procesor and single. Im guessing there is. Looking at used machines.
  • Reply 10 of 27
    Quote:

    Originally posted by antartican

    Ps. Is there a big difference bewteen dual procesor and single. Im guessing there is. Looking at used machines.



    Two thoughts. One, yes dual-processor machines will have a big difference - but not for all software. If you are using software you know can take advantage of it, you'll be glad you did. But for many applications - you'll just be able to do more things in parallel, and not get bogged down by any one task.



    I just ordered (a week ago) a dual-core 2.3 machine, so obviously I'm going with the powermac because I want the expansion capability and because I don't want to get in on version 1 of the intel macs. I almost went with the Quad machine but it was just a bit too much $$.



    That said, my advice to you, for what it is worth, is to bypass the mini and go with the iMac. It has the G5 processor, it is fast, it has the integrated LCD (saves you much $$$) and you can use it today - not wait a year. That is a machine I would seriously consider if I wasn't going to bury mine with video and other tasks. By all means find the nearest Apple store or retailer and try these machines out. I'm sure there is one in their line that you'll be happy with.
  • Reply 11 of 27
    dude, you should seriously check out the 17" imac g5. or the 20" or maybe the iBook g4. you'd think it was underpowered at first, but then sooner or later you will find yourself doing most stuff on the mac and just firing up windows for a counterStrike/hl2/ut2004 sesion or somefin...
  • Reply 12 of 27
    slugheadslughead Posts: 1,169member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by sunilraman

    dude, you should seriously check out the 17" imac g5. or the 20" or maybe the iBook g4. you'd think it was underpowered at first, but then sooner or later you will find yourself doing most stuff on the mac and just firing up windows for a counterStrike/hl2/ut2004 sesion or somefin...



    I agree.. sort of



    I think the best solution is to get the cheapest powermac (possibly refurbished), which is about the same price as the 20" imac. Then get a cheap, upgradable PC for gaming.



    The reason being three fold:

    1. The imac runs hotter than [insert bad joke here]. I don't trust it, especially the hard drive, to last more than a couple years. The hard drive, from many reports, runs about 50°C hotter than the MAXIMAL SAFE temperature. This is bad. I'm wondering what other components in that "sleak" case are getting toasty. As someone who tests hard drives for a living.. It's BAD! BAD BAD BAD!

    2. you can't hook up a KVM to the iMac to use your PC, so you'd have to have mucho desk space to have dual monitors.

    3. Let's face it: you NEED upgradability. Powermac has it, iMac doesn't.
  • Reply 13 of 27
    mrsinmrsin Posts: 163member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by antartican

    Im a hardcore Windows user.



    I'm a 'charter' member of the "hardcore Windows user club," that is until September 4, 2005, which is when I purchased my first Apple and laptop (notebook) computer. I got the iBook G4 14" running Tiger 10.4.2, which I upgraded to 10.4.3 this past Monday. Now I so want to replace my Windows XP Pro desktop PC with a dual processor Power Mac G5! Like you, I really have no need for such a powerful computer, but I have been so thoroughly pleased with my iBook, I spend over 90% of my computing time on it and 10% or less on my Windows desktop PC! I'm still paying for my iBook, but when that is finished, I will be chomping at the bit for a Power Mac ! Just thought I would share.
  • Reply 14 of 27
    sunilramansunilraman Posts: 8,133member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by slughead

    I agree.. sort of



    I think the best solution is to get the cheapest powermac (possibly refurbished), which is about the same price as the 20" imac. Then get a cheap, upgradable PC for gaming.



    The reason being three fold:

    1. The imac runs hotter than [insert bad joke here]. I don't trust it, especially the hard drive, to last more than a couple years. The hard drive, from many reports, runs about 50°C hotter than the MAXIMAL SAFE temperature. This is bad. I'm wondering what other components in that "sleak" case are getting toasty. As someone who tests hard drives for a living.. It's BAD! BAD BAD BAD!

    2. you can't hook up a KVM to the iMac to use your PC, so you'd have to have mucho desk space to have dual monitors.

    3. Let's face it: you NEED upgradability. Powermac has it, iMac doesn't.




    would you suggest like a dualie powermac g4 ?? quicksilver/MDD? that would be cool for the poster antartican -- cheap, robust, upgradeable, works well in KVM/multiple monitor situations. only thing is warranties not fully covered.... and the Quiksilver/Mirrored Drive Doors still oozes mac sex appeal edit: it is also more powerful, depending on configurations, than tha mac mini.



    but yeah go a dualcore 2ghz powermac g5 that would rock too
  • Reply 15 of 27
    gongon Posts: 2,437member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by slughead

    I think the best solution is to get the cheapest powermac (possibly refurbished), which is about the same price as the 20" imac. Then get a cheap, upgradable PC for gaming.



    The reason being three fold:

    1. The imac runs hotter than [insert bad joke here]. I don't trust it, especially the hard drive, to last more than a couple years. The hard drive, from many reports, runs about 50°C hotter than the MAXIMAL SAFE temperature. This is bad. I'm wondering what other components in that "sleak" case are getting toasty. As someone who tests hard drives for a living.. It's BAD! BAD BAD BAD!

    2. you can't hook up a KVM to the iMac to use your PC, so you'd have to have mucho desk space to have dual monitors.

    3. Let's face it: you NEED upgradability. Powermac has it, iMac doesn't.




    No argument about iMac and HD temperatures. I also agree with your view on monitors, desk space, and headless machines, and think the most essential "upgradability" there is, is that the computer and the display are not married. It's a shame Apple doesn't offer a good, reasonably priced headless box beyond the bare minimum.



    Regarding a random guy on the Internet automatically NEEDING upgradability, I call bullshit. I've been living on DOS/Windows PC's for ten years, built two of them. Then Powerbook, then iBook. I have never once upgraded anything besides one modem, one network card (both these about ten years ago), two hard drives, and memory. No graphics card, processor, motherboard, sound card, optical drive swap even once in fifteen years. There just isn't much outside professional use that requires internal upgrading, as long as you buy balanced components from the start. Computers contain more and more functionality as standard, and Apple especially seems to lead this. And then there is external extendability. Just recently my neighbor with a crappy laptop set himself up a nice home theater system, and needed sound from the computer. He just bought an external Creative soundboard and plugged it in USB2.0.



    Gaming PC's are the unfortunate reality in gaming. A fast Mac can be fine as long as the titles you want happen to be available (such as Blizzard games), but the way I understand the Mac gaming situation is that people need to pay twice to get one quarter as many major game titles, which still run slower.



    While I don't think the suggestion of Powermac is a bad one, it just isn't price attractive. I'd rather suggest mini for a year, keeping the PC alongside it for the games (it isn't a really old one, is it?), and then seeing if Apple has got their head out of their ass about the headless machines. There isn't much to depreciate in any case, and resale value should be pretty good when you resell before the 1-year warranty runs out.
  • Reply 16 of 27
    We've got 3 Macs going in the family. My wife has a 12" iBook that she loves, the "family computer is a rev a 20" iMac and I have a 15" PB for business travel that is attached to a 23" display in the office.



    My preference? Using the 23" display, with the 20" iMac in second place. I used PCs from DOS to XP and loved switching. As soon as I became comfortable with the OS my focus turned to the display size and I'm very addicted to a large screen.



    My recommendation is to go with the basic 20" iMac + AppleCare. You save a lot of money using good 3rd party RAM and will get a gig stick fairly fast - then a second later, if you're like me. My reason for this recommendation is that you get the horsepower you'll want (especially with the extra RAM) and get a lot of experience on OS X. Later, IF you decide you want more power, you can get a good resale price for the iMac, especially if it is "loaded".



    The other recommendation would be a maxed out Mac mini with the 23" display - which is about the same price as the 20" iMac. This gives you the screen you would kill for and a chance to play with the Mac. It won't have the power, even if you max the RAM, but it's a very good start. Buying both the mini and display at the same time from the Apple Store (with your student discount) will allow you to get AppleCare coverage on the display as well as the mini. The key here is that you know it's slower than the PowerMac (a real understatement), but it will take care of basic stuff while you get used to OS X. You'll keep an eye out for developments in the PM (which I believe will be a BTO option for dual dual processors in the lower two ranges) and will move when you're comfortable. Selling the Mac mini will also bring in a good return.



    Go for the screen real-estate and you'll be pretty well set.
  • Reply 17 of 27
    slugheadslughead Posts: 1,169member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Gon

    I have never once upgraded anything besides one modem, one network card (both these about ten years ago), two hard drives, and memory. No graphics card, processor, motherboard, sound card, optical drive swap even once in fifteen years.



    (Personal attack removed - JL)



    You're running a 15 year old PC and you haven't upgraded?



    How could you even use the thing? You couldn't run even windows 98.. '95 would probably even give you trouble.



    Please clarify, otherwise I have absolutely no ability to believe that... unless you just use it to run DOS



    Even if you could run windows 95 and MS office.. it'd take like 10 minutes to print a 3 page document.. not to mention that even browsing the internet would be monumentally annoying.... my god you probably couldn't even run flash.. and PDFs would be damn near impossible.
  • Reply 18 of 27
    Quote:

    Originally posted by slughead





    You're running a 15 year old PC and you haven't upgraded?



    How could you even use the thing? You couldn't run even windows 98.. '95 would probably even give you trouble.



    Please clarify, otherwise I have absolutely no ability to believe that... unless you just use it to run DOS



    Even if you could run windows 95 and MS office.. it'd take like 10 minutes to print a 3 page document.. not to mention that even browsing the internet would be monumentally annoying.... my god you probably couldn't even run flash.. and PDFs would be damn near impossible.




    RE-READ the post!!



    he said he BUILT two of them.. this implys at LEAST 2 PCs in ten years (i would say more) so, at the LEAST thats 1 PC lasts 5 years... so at most his PC is 5 years old that should run Win2000.... if not XP.



    Also, he talked about PICKING the right components so as not to need an upgrade... therefore one would imagine he didnt buy hunks of junk that wouldnt last a week, but components that would still give good service in a couple of years time.



    i say again, RE-READ the post
  • Reply 19 of 27
    slugheadslughead Posts: 1,169member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Trendannoyer

    RE-READ the post!!



    he said he BUILT two of them.. this implys at LEAST 2 PCs in ten years (i would say more) so, at the LEAST thats 1 PC lasts 5 years... so at most his PC is 5 years old that should run Win2000.... if not XP.



    Also, he talked about PICKING the right components so as not to need an upgrade... therefore one would imagine he didnt buy hunks of junk that wouldnt last a week, but components that would still give good service in a couple of years time.



    i say again, RE-READ the post




    I'll take your word for it.. I need to not post while sober sheesh
  • Reply 20 of 27
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by antartican

    [B]Thanks for all the responses. Well my windows vaio laptop is around 1 and a half years and it is top of the line except for the dvd burner. So I can use that one for gamings. Yeah I think im going to go with the imac. Although im still deciding. I have though about buying the mac mini for 400 something and getting a onethousand dollar screen. It would work for me very well. But ahh it is such a tough decision. I guess im going to have to flip a coin on this one. Oh by the way my vaio laptop just fried and its motherboard needs to be replaced. Glad I had insurance for it. But still I feel betrayed. That's why it kept crashing. Ahhhh. Oh also, I don't need any upgradability im not the guy that gets bothered enough to upgrade it. Thats just a good excuse to replace it. Why do the powermacs have to be so damn expensive. Why can't they be like all other powerfull desktops. Start at 1500 and go up to 2500. It makes sense and apple could benefit from this. But then again apple is all about excentric tech guys that want the most powerfull machine around.
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