Dell to take a second stab at retail

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
As it struggles to maintain its lead as the number one personal computer marker, Apple Computer rival Dell Inc. plans to once again dabble in the retail business when it launches two stores at shopping centers later this year.



Though unlike Apple, which stocks products on-hand for customers to carry out after purchase, Dell will remain true to its direct model by having shoppers order products online for later delivery, according to Statesman.com.



The Round Rock, Texas-based Windows PC maker plans to open its first location at the NorthPark Center in Dallas, Texas in late summer and followup with a store at the massive Palisades Center in West Nyack, New York in the fall.



The store will reportedly span about 3,000 square feet and face-off against Apple retail stores which currently operate out of both shopping plazas.



For Dell, this won't be the first time it has dipped its toes into the retail arena. About three years ago, the company ended an experiment with small outlets at a handful of Sears department stores.



According to Statesman, the company currently operates 161 kiosks at malls across the United States, where customers can preview a selection of its products and place orders.



The two full-size stores, which Dell claims will be an extension of its kiosks model, are considered to be part of a pilot program aimed at displaying more products and systems for customers. They will reportedly feature a home theater display designed around a personal computer as well as systems designed specifically for kids.



According to Statesman, the stores will also sell Dell services, such as home network installation. However, the company is still "working out how to handle tech support questions that existing customers might bring to the store."



The success of Apple's retail strategy has largely been attributed to the customer support offered through its Genius Bars, which are installed as a centerpiece in each of the company's 147 locations world-wide. There, trained staffers answer questions, offer solutions, handle repairs and provide technical and creative support on a one-on-one basis with Mac and iPod users.



Apple's latest retail store opened this past weekend in Midtown Manhattan to a crowd of over 3000 enthused shoppers.
«13

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 55
    the cool gutthe cool gut Posts: 1,714member
    I can see it now ....



  • Reply 2 of 55
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,665member
    Ooooh, nice picture. Except if it were Dell's giant cube it would be made out of Plexiglas and two by fours.



    I wonder if the Dell stores will be laid out as nicely as their website.



    That way they could have the same systems for different prices at different places in the store.



    At any rate, I thought there was something of a consensus that one of the big problems with the Gateway stores was not having product in stock that you could walk out with.



    I think when people are shopping at brick and mortar, they want the psychological payoff of taking home their new toy.



    If it's just about ordering something on the internet, you can do that at home-- although I suppose people might drop by to see something "in person" they were going to buy anyway .
  • Reply 3 of 55
    chris cuillachris cuilla Posts: 4,825member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by addabox

    Ooooh, nice picture. Except if it were Dell's giant cube it would be made out of Plexiglas and two by fours.







    Quote:

    Originally posted by addabox

    I think when people are shopping at brick and mortar, they want the psychological payoff of taking home their new toy.



    Absolutely. This has to be the stupidest idea ever. I mean...I walk into a Dell store...fiddle around...decide to buy one...and then the nice fellow smiles and says "Thanks, that'll be delivered to your house in 3-4 days."



    Whack!
  • Reply 4 of 55
    jbondojbondo Posts: 6member
    i think this will fail, as all other pc attempts at the retail thing have. the pc manufacturers neglect to realize that apple has a magic element that they never will-- passionate users. pc people and mac people are two different breeds. most of us get fucking excited about every damn thing that happens in the apple world, and keep up on apple news daily. does anyone really bother to give a shit what dell does on a day-to-day basis? maybe those invested in it, but doubtfully anyone that would be a potential retail customer. apple has a following that is so valuable, yet unmatchable... simply building a stupid store in a mall isn't going to create a pc equivalent.
  • Reply 5 of 55
    solsunsolsun Posts: 763member
    Woohoo!! All right now, Who's gonna fly to Dallas to camp out and be the first in line for the grand opening?
  • Reply 6 of 55
    sondjatasondjata Posts: 308member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Chris Cuilla









    Absolutely. This has to be the stupidest idea ever. I mean...I walk into a Dell store...fiddle around...decide to buy one...and then the nice fellow smiles and says "Thanks, that'll be delivered to your house in 3-4 days."



    Whack!




    I walk into a Dell store...fiddle around...decide to buy one...and then the nice fellow smiles and says "Thanks, that'll be delivered to your house in 3-4 days."



    Or you can go to the Apple Store downstairs and get a Macbook and take it home right now!
  • Reply 7 of 55
    ipickle06ipickle06 Posts: 14member
    I did not know Dell and Apple are "rivals"...
  • Reply 8 of 55
    Quote:

    Originally posted by iPickle06

    I did not know Dell and Apple are "rivals"...



    ... well... they're not "Allies"...
  • Reply 9 of 55
    mike12309mike12309 Posts: 135member
    Quote:

    According to Statesman, the company currently operates 161 kiosks at malls across the United States, where customers can preview a selection of its products and place orders.



    Thats good, because i can never figure out what they are selling by their website... i see one for $400 another for $1500 -- its a joke and a mess. Im glad their making the start decision and fixing website inconsistency by opening a series of retail stores to show the public their products... wait... what?
  • Reply 10 of 55
    Quote:

    Originally posted by iPickle06

    I did not know Dell and Apple are "rivals"...



    They are, when you get down to it, more rivals tha Apple and Microsoft are. Apple considers itself first and foremost a hardware company. MS doesn't compete in that space. And now that IntelMacs can boot Windows, MS has even less reason to be "concerned" or "against" Apple and the Mac platform.



    Nope, Dell is an Apple rivl, now that you can buy a Mac that run OS X and Windows XP.
  • Reply 11 of 55
    jtblqjtblq Posts: 86member
    there won't be a line outside of Dell's store...

    maybe a few alienware 'neurds' but that's it...and an IT guy with nothing better to do...

    this is a joke.

  • Reply 12 of 55
    rspressrspress Posts: 31member
    Why would anyone in their right mind go to a dell store so they can order products online?



    Do they expect mom and pop to come in, order and pay for a new computer and wait for it to be delivered? With shipping charges?



    Will you have to order a Dell pukebox and shitty, er, I mean a dell Jukebox and Ditty as well or will they stock those in the store. The great thing about the Apple Stores and what makes it worth traveling to if you leave a distance away from it is that you can come home with something if you want to.



    I can go to an Apple store and pick up a complete system, DV camera, digital camera, iPod and lots of other goodies and bring them home the same day.



    What will Dell offer to draw the customers in?
  • Reply 13 of 55
    rspressrspress Posts: 31member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mike12309

    [B]



    Thats good, because i can never figure out what they are selling by their website... i see one for $400 another for $1500 -- its a joke and a mess. Im glad their making the start decision and fixing website inconsistency by opening a series of retail stores to show the public their products... wait... what?




    Let us hope they staff it with people that actually know what they are talking about. Every time that I have been to Staples in recent years I have had to call friends on my cell phone to find out where the products are as the salespeople have no idea what is in their own stores. I feel sorry for anyone who actually buys a computer from them.
  • Reply 14 of 55
    bedouinbedouin Posts: 331member
    So you can order the same cheap crap you get on-line, except now you spend $5 on gas to do it in person? Great business idea.
  • Reply 15 of 55
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,665member
    Hmmm......



    I wonder if Dell is making a big mistake by putting their stores directly across from existing Apple locations.



    I could kind of imagine someone popping into the Dell store, finding out that you can't actually buy anything, then checking out the Apple store right across the way in a state of highly susceptible consumerus interuptus and consummating the act.
  • Reply 16 of 55
    ronnronn Posts: 515member
    I can see it helping a bit. When I go to an Apple store it's to check out the merchandise firsthand. I'd never buy directly from Apple because it's more expensive and I have to pay a buttload of taxes compared to online where you often get free shipping, at least some savings and ocassionally some freebie, however small.



    While at the 5th Avenue opening, I fooled around with the MacBooks. Not only did it change my mind about a laptop purchase -- originally, I was less than 50/50 about buying portables, and almost deadset against the Black version given the price premium for the minor cosmetics -- but I was able to convince a friend and co-worker to maybe finally buy her first Mac.



    If Dell can convince a few confused customers to come in and make a final decision, this can be a profitable move. I know of co-workers that gave up on an employee discount purchase because they couldn't understand what they could get from the catalog or even at the online store.
  • Reply 17 of 55
    mchumanmchuman Posts: 154member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by ronn

    If Dell can convince a few confused customers to come in and make a final decision, this can be a profitable move.



    You are forgetting something - Dell's products are not about "the user experience" like Apple. They are commodity PCs sold cheap to cheap people and corporations. Their sales will NOT benefit by people seeing them in person, because conceptually, that has never been why people buy them.



    On the other hand, Apple is about the experience, and seeing and using their products. Dell is totally mixed up and will be bankrupt within a year. Their stock should be trading at pennies right now relative to the valuation Apple's stock is unfortunately at.



    What Dell is doing is like Apple inventing the iPod and thinking that only selling it online is a smart strategy.
  • Reply 18 of 55
    e1618978e1618978 Posts: 6,075member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by McHuman

    Dell is totally mixed up and will be bankrupt within a year.



    Except Apple, the rest of the PC industry (Microsoft, Dell, etc) all seem like they are phoning it in. How could they be such big screw ups, when they have so much money at their disposal to spend on R&D?
  • Reply 19 of 55
    nvrsaynvrnvrsaynvr Posts: 64member
    Ha ha!!



    Dumb Dell Model.... Just like their computers!







    "Think Alike... BE Different!"
  • Reply 20 of 55
    backtomacbacktomac Posts: 4,579member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by McHuman

    Dell is totally mixed up and will be bankrupt within a year. Their stock should be trading at pennies right now relative to the valuation Apple's stock is unfortunately at.



    \\\\




    I don't think so. People are being a little quick to throw dirt on Dell. Don't be surprised to see the revenge of the empire in a year or two.
Sign In or Register to comment.