Tiger update to pack iSync improvements

2

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 50
    aegisdesignaegisdesign Posts: 2,914member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by lundy

    FWIW, iSync is Version 2.3 (Build 500.86). Is that different from the 10.4.6 install?



    Interesting. It's Version 2.2 (108.0) in 10.4.6
  • Reply 22 of 50
    lundylundy Posts: 4,466member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Cosmos 1999

    Is there any developper here who has a build of 10.4.7 with this new iSync?

    If so, can you please tell us if there is support for one or several Samsung mobile phones?




    There are no Samsung phones at all in the plist. There are icons with labels, none of which have the numbers you listed. Is this right - that there are no Samsung phones sold in the US?
  • Reply 23 of 50
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,001member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by lundy

    There are no Samsung phones at all in the plist. There are icons with labels, none of which have the numbers you listed. Is this right - that there are no Samsung phones sold in the US?



    Not even close! Samsung is popular here. I had a Samsung i330 Palm based PDA for several years.
  • Reply 24 of 50
    frank777frank777 Posts: 5,834member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by aegisdesign

    Been able to do that for a long time. Just use IMAP.



    As I understand it, using IMAP means keeping all your mail on your server.



    For anyone who works in publishing, (or anybody who receives a lot of graphics/attachments) that's not an option.



    My Mailboxes folder is 3.5GB. And I doubt anybody's ISP is going to keep that volume of mail up on a server.



    I want to be able to reliably sync my laptop mail with my desktop mail each night.

    Apple can easily build this feature into Leopard. It's just an extension of what's already there.
  • Reply 25 of 50
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,502member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Frank777

    As I understand it, using IMAP means keeping all your mail on your server.



    For anyone who works in publishing, (or anybody who receives a lot of graphics/attachments) that's not an option.



    My Mailboxes folder is 3.5GB. And I doubt anybody's ISP is going to keep that volume of mail up on a server.



    I want to be able to reliably sync my laptop mail with my desktop mail each night.

    Apple can easily build this feature into Leopard. It's just an extension of what's already there.




    If you have 3.5Gb of mail attachments then there is something you don't get about email services. Buy a 3U space off of a nation-wide ISP in a collocation facility and then run WebDav with SVN to archive these attachements. Make a secure account for your clients to upload these attachments and then drag a link into Mail.app to reference the changes.



    Either access it via WebDav or a client SVN application that allows you to update your account with your centrally located 3.5Gb and growing attachment archive.



    IMAP frees you up to be anywhere in the world and access your email.



    Think about your needs and then address them accordingly.



    You may not like this advise but then again with WebDav and SVN you can make sure you don't flood email pipes with large binary blobs unnecessarily.
  • Reply 26 of 50
    mrtotesmrtotes Posts: 759member
    Whilst I hate to admit owning a PocketPC device, until PocketOSX arrives many of us are stuck.



    I'd love to see iSync supporting these devices. Apple would only have to develop this one solution and a huge range of PocketPC devices would be supported.



    PocketMac plain doesn't work and certainly doesn't deserve the Pro title it's authors claim. Mark/Space would seem to have similar issues.



    mrtotes
  • Reply 27 of 50
    lundylundy Posts: 4,466member
    Yeah, you're not supposed to keep huge email attachments as part of the mail messages, because there are limits on the storage of email. Even Google tops out at I think 2 GB.



    Download them, save 'em in a database, put 'em on an FTP site, etc.



    You can run an AppleScript on them to tag the files with the sender's email address as you download the attachments. That way you remember who sent them. You could also tag the attachment with the message ID of the original message.



    In fact, I'd advise setting a Mail rule that ran a script on every incoming message that would save any attachments to the hard drive in a particular folder, then you can put either a Folder Action or a launchd action on that folder and have it upload anything it gets to your ftp server.



    Of course, the absolute best solution is not to accept incoming work as email attachments, but rather as uploads to an ftp server. You give every client an account on the server and they can only upload to their own folder.
  • Reply 28 of 50
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,949member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mdriftmeyer

    If you have 3.5Gb of mail attachments then there is something you don't get about email services. Buy a 3U space off of a nation-wide ISP in a collocation facility and then run WebDav with SVN to archive these attachements. Make a secure account for your clients to upload these attachments and then drag a link into Mail.app to reference the changes.



    Either access it via WebDav or a client SVN application that allows you to update your account with your centrally located 3.5Gb and growing attachment archive.



    IMAP frees you up to be anywhere in the world and access your email.



    Think about your needs and then address them accordingly.



    You may not like this advise but then again with WebDav and SVN you can make sure you don't flood email pipes with large binary blobs unnecessarily.




    Frankly, that sounds like a needlessly complicated and (I'm surprised I'm saying this) almost hopelessly inelegant arrangement.
  • Reply 29 of 50
    Quote:

    Originally posted by melgross

    Not even close! Samsung is popular here. I had a Samsung i330 Palm based PDA for several years.





    From what I've read elsewhere, Samsung's software is not, and will never be compatible with iSync... This includes their implementation of Bluetooth. For us poor Sprint cell users, this means almost no Bluetooth phone choices that will sync with our Macs.
  • Reply 30 of 50
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,001member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by almostwise

    From what I've read elsewhere, Samsung's software is not, and will never be compatible with iSync... This includes their implementation of Bluetooth. For us poor Sprint cell users, this means almost no Bluetooth phone choices that will sync with our Macs.



    I used Markspace and never had a problem. That's what it's for. I'd rather have the phone I want, and pay $40 or so for the sync program, then have a phone I don't want, just because it will natively sync.
  • Reply 31 of 50
    Quote:

    Originally posted by almostwise

    From what I've read elsewhere, Samsung's software is not, and will never be compatible with iSync... This includes their implementation of Bluetooth. For us poor Sprint cell users, this means almost no Bluetooth phone choices that will sync with our Macs.



    Not quite. A friend of mine (PC user) came to my home and said he didn't manage to connect his Samsung mobile phone with his PC via BT. I fired up Bluetooth File Exchange on my iMac G5 and told the software to pair it with his listed phone, and all went fine after the mutual acceptance of codes. We transfered several files between the devices. So "Samsung Bluetooth protocol" is Mac-compatible (but that's the way Bluetooth is made for BTW).



    The "problem" with Samsung phone is not Bluetooth, it was the way the information was organized to synchronize your life events (calendar, contacts...), because it was all proprietary so no iCal nor Address Book sync.

    Now Samsung appears to use SyncML (Synchronization Markup Language) and is even an official sponsor of the OMA (Open Mobile Alliance) which standardize SyncML.



    But... nova media, which create iSync plugins for unsupported phones, says Samsung SyncML is a bit different than the SyncML standard used in iSync, and thus for now they cannot implement theses phones, Apple needs to add some things in iSync before.



    There is a discussion on Apple Support pages about this issue.
  • Reply 32 of 50
    frank777frank777 Posts: 5,834member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by lundy

    Yeah, you're not supposed to keep huge email attachments as part of the mail messages, because there are limits on the storage of email. Even Google tops out at I think 2 GB.



    Download them, save 'em in a database, put 'em on an FTP site, etc.



    You can run an AppleScript on them to tag the files with the sender's email address as you download the attachments. That way you remember who sent them. You could also tag the attachment with the message ID of the original message.



    In fact, I'd advise setting a Mail rule that ran a script on every incoming message that would save any attachments to the hard drive in a particular folder, then you can put either a Folder Action or a launchd action on that folder and have it upload anything it gets to your ftp server.



    Of course, the absolute best solution is not to accept incoming work as email attachments, but rather as uploads to an ftp server. You give every client an account on the server and they can only upload to their own folder.




    I appreciate the reply. When I switched to Mail, its Rules weren't quite there yet.

    I'll look into it.



    This isn't a dealbreaker by any means. I enjoy working on my 12" PB in my satellite office and I am always careful to transfer any sent mail on my laptop to my main machine.



    And the PB doesn't wipe the mail off the server when it checks, so my main machine always has my full record of correspondence.



    But as Jeff says, all this is workable, but inelegant and un-Mac-like.



    I should be able to dock my laptop and desktop each night and find that in the morning both machines are up to date.



    If a Blackberry can sync its mail messages with a PC desktop, why can't two Apple-produced machines do the same thing?



    I really believe that this is a reason more business users don't buy both a laptop and desktop machine, because of the fear that they'll be caught offside with a needed file on the other machine.



    The bottom line is, build in real dual-machine file sync capabilities into Leopard, and I believe Apple will sell a lot more hardware.
  • Reply 33 of 50
    aegisdesignaegisdesign Posts: 2,914member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Frank777

    This isn't a dealbreaker by any means. I enjoy working on my 12" PB in my satellite office and I am always careful to transfer any sent mail on my laptop to my main machine.



    And the PB doesn't wipe the mail off the server when it checks, so my main machine always has my full record of correspondence.



    But as Jeff says, all this is workable, but inelegant and un-Mac-like.



    I should be able to dock my laptop and desktop each night and find that in the morning both machines are up to date.



    If a Blackberry can sync its mail messages with a PC desktop, why can't two Apple-produced machines do the same thing?



    I really believe that this is a reason more business users don't buy both a laptop and desktop machine, because of the fear that they'll be caught offside with a needed file on the other machine.



    The bottom line is, build in real dual-machine file sync capabilities into Leopard, and I believe Apple will sell a lot more hardware.




    I fail to see what's not elegant about IMAP folders. WebDAV and SVN, sure but that's more for archival purposes which it sounds like you should be doing.



    I'd love to see you sync 3.5GB onto a Blackberry.
  • Reply 34 of 50
    hirohiro Posts: 2,663member
    Because it's a big change that forces us to do something in a radically different way and purchase other services that we really don't need. That's not elegant to me.



    Just synch my damn desktop and laptop accounts and where ever I go in the world with my laptop I am good to go. When I get home or back to work, one button to resynch them over the wireless, let 'em resynch and everything is hunky-dory. Worst case, one network jack to connect and hit the same button.



    THAT's elegant.
  • Reply 35 of 50
    aegisdesignaegisdesign Posts: 2,914member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Hiro

    [B]Because it's a big change that forces us to do something in a radically different way and purchase other services that we really don't need. That's not elegant to me.



    Huh? I've yet to come across an ISP that doesn't have IMAP. All it takes is for you to switch the account in mail from POP3 to IMAP usually. Done.
  • Reply 36 of 50
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,949member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by aegisdesign

    Huh? I've yet to come across an ISP that doesn't have IMAP. All it takes is for you to switch the account in mail from POP3 to IMAP usually. Done.



    But what you suggested wasn't just IMAP, but in conjunction with a colo'd server (money), using some sort of other services I've never heard of patched together with custom software.
  • Reply 37 of 50
    faederafaedera Posts: 9member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by lundy

    There are no Samsung phones at all in the plist. There are icons with labels, none of which have the numbers you listed. Is this right - that there are no Samsung phones sold in the US?



    iSync is developed in France because Europeans get all the good phones first. Samsung is very popular in Europe so I wonder why they don't do some extra work to get their phones play nice with iSync.
  • Reply 38 of 50
    aegisdesignaegisdesign Posts: 2,914member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by JeffDM

    But what you suggested wasn't just IMAP, but in conjunction with a colo'd server (money), using some sort of other services I've never heard of patched together with custom software.



    Actually, I didn't suggest anything other than IMAP for syncing mail.



    WebDAV is the protocol used by Apple for iDisk.



    SVN is 'Subversion' - a version control system. I'm not sure why that was suggested as WebDAV has built in version control.



    All three are standard on Macs and not custom at all. All are open standards.
  • Reply 39 of 50
    aegisdesignaegisdesign Posts: 2,914member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by faedera

    iSync is developed in France because Europeans get all the good phones first. Samsung is very popular in Europe so I wonder why they don't do some extra work to get their phones play nice with iSync.



    iSync is developed in France ?
  • Reply 40 of 50
    faederafaedera Posts: 9member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by aegisdesign

    iSync is developed in France ?



    Yes. Go to http://jobs.apple.com and search for jobs in France and you'll find job "2608069, iSync Software Engineer, Les Ulis - European HQ, FRA"
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