Macbook Sleep

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited January 2014
How often should you shut down your Macbook instead of just closing the lid and letting it sleep? I'm a switcher and I'm so used to just turning it off when I'm done.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 16
    It really isn't a big issue what you do, IMO ? I rarely shut off my iBook ?_most of the time I just shut the lid and wake it back up in the morning.



    Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, though.
  • Reply 2 of 16
    mbaynhammbaynham Posts: 534member
    nar you shud turn it off man. if you keep it on sleep it will make the system run slower
  • Reply 3 of 16
    You don't need to shut down a mac like you so a PC. Even though it is unix based, you should still shut it down every once in a while, you just don't need to all the time.



    Remember that putting it into sleep uses some battery power, so it is off the charger and unused for a long time, then you should turn it off.
  • Reply 4 of 16
    irelandireland Posts: 17,749member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by CityGuy88

    How often should you shut down your Macbook instead of just closing the lid and letting it sleep? I'm a switcher and I'm so used to just turning it off when I'm done.



    At least every night.







    .............



  • Reply 5 of 16
    mcnewbiemcnewbie Posts: 27member
    I've actually been taught that unless you are turning it on quite soon say within the hour sleep is fine but if it be longer than that you shouldn't leave it on sleep. I've been leaving it on sleep after hearing quite a few leave it on sleep. Is this a bad thing for my MB?
  • Reply 6 of 16
    No, you can leave it on sleep all the time.
  • Reply 7 of 16
    akheron01akheron01 Posts: 152member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by jpennington

    No, you can leave it on sleep all the time.



    I second that! What's with all of this trash you're filling his head with about it effecting system performance or having a drastic effect on his energy bill? The closest thing to shutting down you EVER have to do is restarting for a major upgrade.
  • Reply 8 of 16
    kickahakickaha Posts: 8,760member
    Exactly.



    I reboot my machines exactly as often as necessary... which is whenever a new OS release comes out.



    In other words, every couple of months.



    Just let the machine sleep, and it will take almost no power, be ready for you when you need it, and not hurt a thing.
  • Reply 9 of 16
    pbpb Posts: 4,234member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Kickaha

    Exactly.



    I reboot my machines exactly as often as necessary... which is whenever a new OS release comes out.



    In other words, every couple of months.



    Just let the machine sleep, and it will take almost no power, be ready for you when you need it, and not hurt a thing.




    Just to complete Kickaha's comments: my Powerbook has remained on for 118 days now in a row without shutdown, only sleep when no in use, with a fair amount of stress on the system. And no, there is absolutely no performance penalty. The only case I run into performance issues is when the available RAM is consumed (OS X stability encourages you to abuse Macs these days ); in this case, closing all applications or, better yet, logging out and then logging in can free the memory and the system is back happy again.
  • Reply 10 of 16
    mcnewbiemcnewbie Posts: 27member
    This is kinda in with topic I downloaded the Coconut Battery Meter and about two weeks ago when I first got my Macbook it told me that my battery was actually HIGHER than it's original max capacity, now it's only 99% what could have caused the depreciation in my battery's strength so soon? Is there any way of restoring it?
  • Reply 11 of 16
    mackilroymackilroy Posts: 34member
    The CBM tells you that or the bar at the top of the screen tells you that? Mac OS X will keep it at just below 100 % after charging it to full ? I forget why but I remember it was a good reason.
  • Reply 12 of 16
    mcnewbiemcnewbie Posts: 27member
    So it doesn't mean that my battery is wrecked?
  • Reply 13 of 16
    drumsticksdrumsticks Posts: 315member
    Mac OS X does not charge the battery if it is 95% or more. That is, if you have a 100% battery, use it till 96%, and then plug it in, it will stay at 96%. Only if you dip below 95% will it charge back to 100% again.



    This is by design and intended to make sure you don't unnecessarily overuse the battery.



    And for monitoring your battery capacity over time, I recommend Xbattery instead of Coconut Battery. It has an ugly interface, but does a fantastic job. It automatically takes a reading every 24 hours (when your machine is on, at least) and you can see a plot of your maximum capacity over the long run.



    Of course, it also records short term fluctuations as well
  • Reply 14 of 16
    mcnewbiemcnewbie Posts: 27member
    Quote:

    [i]And for monitoring your battery capacity over time, I recommend Xbattery instead of Coconut Battery [/B]



    Thanks! Can you possibly point me to the right direction of the app? Apps such as Coconut Battery and other such apps made by just people like you & I (not pro's) are they accurate?
  • Reply 15 of 16
    aplnubaplnub Posts: 2,605member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by McNewbie

    Thanks! Can you possibly point me to the right direction of the app? Apps such as Coconut Battery and other such apps made by just people like you & I (not pro's) are they accurate?



    My iBook sleeps for weeks at a time. Of course it is plugged in most of the time too.
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