dinkydogs

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dinkydogs
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  • Apple Watch can detect early signs of diabetes with 85% accuracy, study finds

    araquen said:
    I am fairly critical of the eHeart Study. 

    They classified me as having COPD because I used to have chronic bronchitis, which was brought on by a dust allergen (the bronchitis immediately cleared up when I took an antihistamine. Pretty sure COPD doesn't work that way). I haven't had bronchitis in years since I started working from home. This is not symptomatic of COPD at all. Nor do I smoke or have emphysema. It's not even a condition my own doctor diagnosed or considers me a risk factor for. 

    When I told the eHeart Study people of the error, they told me they "couldn't fix it" but to tell any surveys I do not have the condition. This is stupid. For one thing, as a consequence, I will NOT be asked to join any non-COPD related studies. I will also no qualify for any COPD related studies. Effectively, they categorized me out of the program.

    When I told them I wanted to leave the program BECAUSE they have no process to correct a mis-"diagnosis" they never responded. And there is no opt-out in the app. Once you're in, you're in forever. 

    So I uninstalled the app and whenever the eHeart Study people send me an email I unsubscribe. 

    But if they are completely unwilling to fix bad data, and have no desire to make sure that they're accurately collecting data to begin with, I can't see how this study can be in any way effective.
    chronic bronchitis is a form of COPD. so they study classified you properly.
    nhtSolilolliverstantheman
  • How to turn your Mac startup chime back on


    that is nice, however is there a command that turns on the damn keyboard backlight prior to login.

    pre-catalina you could see the keys to type in a password, now... darkness

    My keyboard backlight has always turned on prior to the login screen and i'm on catalina
    dysamoria
  • Apple sued for allowing loot boxes in App Store

    svanstrom said:


    The important thing to understand here isn't the Apple-specific situation, but rather that companies could do a lot to trick people into "accidentally" doing purchases; which means that legally there needs to be some sort of guidelines as far as what is trickery, and what is a reasonable level of making sure you as a company don't by complacency allow your customers to accidentally make unwanted purchases.

    So if Apple make their products to be used by children, and allow some type of purchases to happen in relationship to that, then they end up with a legal obligation to one way or another make sure the parents easily understand how to control such purchases. And "parents" in this context doesn't mean some ideal parents with perfect tech competency, but the type of normal parents of the market that buy Apple products.
    I don't know how you can get tricked into accidentally purchasing something. Whenever I make a purchase either in the app store or in a game I have to enter my password or use face id/touch id. So if I see something pop up asking me to approve it and I didn't knowingly purchase something then I hit cancel and don't approve it. Not sure what else a company needs to do other than make a person enter their password to approve a purchase.

    As for the second paragraph you speak in generalitites. What is easy for one person may not be easy for another. Also it doesn't take a parent with perfect tech competency to do anything on apple products, and how do you define normal parent? What's normal for one person may not be normal for another. If a parent doesn't understand how to do it then they should ask for help, either on line, go to the apple store or ask friend or family member. People need to learn to take responsibility for their own actions or kids actions and stop blaming others.
    rotateleftbyteDogperson
  • Apple Watch Fall Detection credited with saving unresponsive Arizona man



    When a user takes a hard fall, Fall Detection will prompt the user to respond and dismiss the notification or contact first responders. If the user doesn't dismiss the dialog within one minute, the Apple Watch will do so automatically.

    This is incorrect. If the user doesn't dismiss the dialog, the watch will contact 911 automatically and not dismiss the dialog automatically.

    I think it also sends a message to your emergency contacts
    watto_cobra