mr. me

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mr. me
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  • Dell abandons its remaining Android tablets, 6 months after HP

    gatorguy said:
    mr. me said:
    Say, what? There is no "tablet market." There is an iPad market and cheap imitation hangers-on. The iPad was never conceived of as a traditional computer replacement.... But the assertion that this was a widely held view is a bit much.
    I don't know how you missed all the "Post-PC" world claims, many from right here at AI. Of course it was widely believed traditional laptops and notebooks were passe' with the arrival of the iPad. Widely of course does not mean everyone or even most. You use "widely believed" to say that something is known, or believed or supported by many people. I think it meets the definition. Do a search for "Post-PC" and note the stories from 2010-2014 predicting or claiming that time has arrived with the advent of the iPad.
    I missed nothing. What you are describing is not Post-PC, but rather a PC in a different form factor. Yes, there were people who believed that we should have been rendering CGI video and developing software on our iPads. I call these people "idiots." Although there were and are more of these people than I would like, I remain unconvinced that their numbers are large enough to classify their view as "widely held."
    brucemcchia
  • Apple invites select developers to Apple silicon Mac labs ahead of launch


    For example:   I installed Windows 10 under Bootcamp on my grandson's MacBook and it is good that I did because without it he would not have been able to use it for Cyberschool.    Likewise, last night, he tried doing a math assignment on his iPad -- but it would only display 9 or the 30 problems he had to solve because it wouldn't scroll.   He shifted over to his now Windows 10 MacBook and completed the assignment.

    Personally, I would want to hear all of the pluses and the minuses of an Apple Silicon Mac before sinking a grand or two into one.
    I am having trouble with this. My experience is that some course content delivery sites are not compatible with mobile devices. I have also seen sites that are incompatible with Chromebooks. When it comes to Windows and Macs, I have never seen the need to use Windows to the exclusion of Macs. There are some sites that require the Chrome browser. However, the Mac version of Chrome works as well as the Windows version of Chrome. Microsoft Edge, Microsoft's new browser, is based on Chrome. However, Microsoft offers Edge for the Mac as well as for Windows.
    watto_cobra
  • Dell abandons its remaining Android tablets, 6 months after HP

    gatorguy said:
    sflocal said:
    But...but... Android fanboys are always telling us their cheap, shitty Android tablets are so much more superior to iPads!!  Say it ain't so!
    The problem IMHO is that tablets just aren't ready to be the traditional computer replacements they were widely expected to be. Sure there's use cases for 'em, but personally I've found them not all that convenient as I prefer a physical keyboard for much of my work, so why flip back and forth between a tablet and perhaps attaching a keyboard compared to simply using up a light notebook in the first place. If I truly want to just grab a connected device for a quick perusal of emails or a specific web search my 5.5" smartphone is plenty good enough. There isn't much if anything I give up by NOT using my tablets, but there often is if NOT using a notebook. 

    The prediction of laptop and desktop computers demise because "iPad!" was a bit premature IMO.
    Say, what? There is no "tablet market." There is an iPad market and cheap imitation hangers-on. The iPad was never conceived of as a traditional computer replacement. There is no question that there are some people who saw the iPad and its competitors as a laptop replacement. But the assertion that this was a widely held view is a bit much.

    The implication is that there was an epic battle between tablets and traditional computers and the traditional computers won. This flies in the face of the facts. The traditional computer market is also retrenching. Dell itself is going private. It chief competitor, HP, has split-up with the big people going with Hewlett Package Enterprise, the services company. Sad to say, but it is my fear that the demise of Apple's Thunderbolt Cinema Display presages the end of the Apple's traditional computers--the Mac Pro and Mac mini. If I am correct, then the iMac will soon be Apple's only desktop line.