thedba

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thedba
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  • Is iPhone still cool? Maybe Apple should flip the script

    iPhones would be extremely cool if Apple could find a way to allow creativity back into the app ecosystem. The iPhone was exciting in the first few years because every day there would be new amazing apps that did things no one had expected a smart device to do. There were apps that could listen to music and tell you what song it was. Another app looked at signs in different languages and turned them into English. There were highly addictive new games to play. Now all of that creative explosion is pretty much dead. The reason is that as soon as some new and exciting app becomes popular, like iDos for example, Apple kills it. Never mind that it had been in the App Store for years and got popular because it could run an extremely early version of Windows, it had violated the rules that Apple made up out of thin air and so had to die. Who is going to risk wasting years of their lives to produce an exciting new app in an ecosystem like that? No one that's who.

    If Apple could carve out a space on the iPhone for risky apps to do risky things without access to the rest of the phone's data or iCloud, excitement could return to iOS. Oculus does this with the Quest. It has a separate app store for apps that are not quite ready to appear on the main app store or do things that Facebook is not yet comfortable with. The user takes the risk but the apps are there and some of them are wonderful. This will not happen on the iPhone because Apple's rules have very little to do with user safety. They are almost all about preserving Apple's control over the iPhone. The need for control is a kind of addiction for Apple's executives. Like other addictions, they are very harmful for both the addict and anyone around them. In this case, it is systematically killing the iPhone platform. Yes the new iPhones have nice new hardware features but when was the last time you bought an iPhone to get access to some amazing new app?
    Everything you describe above is a symptom of a maturing market. Of course in the beginning there was explosive growth. Now we still have growth but it's incremental. 
    Say you've never been to a gym before and you decide to sign up and get healthier. In the beginning you will probably see miraculous results with your body but as time goes by those returns will taper off. 

    What you're describing in your 2nd paragraph is "beta testing". Why would the iPhone allow this? You can do this with your own apps and if you have an app developer's license but beta testing other apps? Why? Where's the demand for this? 
    StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Is iPhone still cool? Maybe Apple should flip the script

    Once upon a time Samsung and a few other players released a smart watch. Apple in those days was nowhere to be seen with their offering and pundits the world over, were standing on their soap boxes and screaming, "Apple better release a smart watch soon or else!!!!!". 
    Well a few years later Apple did release the Apple Watch and by the time the Series 3 was out, Apple was in the lead and widening it. The rest is history.

    Fast forward now to foldable phones. What does a foldable do that a regular smartphone can't? Why spend hundreds of dollars more on it? To pretend to have a tablet by not having one? If Apple one day does release a foldable, it will be because they know their customers and they will have something unique to offer them. Not because pundits are asking for it. 
    viclauyyclkruppFileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Apple continues dominance over global smartphone profits in 2021

    No surprise whatsoever. 
    At this point in time, in a mature smartphone market,  I think it's pointless to be making quarter by quarter comparisons. A more meaningful graph would be a rolling average of the above graphs over many years. The trend would probably show that Apple continues to suck all of the oxygen (profits) out of the proverbial room, leaving the rest of the industry to battle it out for scraps.  
    jas99watto_cobra
  • Steve Jobs wanted Dell to license Mac OS

    hexclock said:
    thedba said:
    jimh2 said:
    The only other person who can confirm this conversation is dead so there is no need to drag Jobs into his need to sell his book. 

    I'd like to meet 10 people who buy this book and read it. Of course it will be on The NY Times best seller list but by now everyone should know by now that bookstores by this garbage sell a few and return the rest to the publisher where they will be resold to the stores that peddle other non-interesting zero value books and merchandise that cannot be sold in legitimate store. This process does get authors on best seller lists.

    Another thing that happens is the company (Dell) will buy enough of these to give to their employees and this counts as a sale. At least his employees will have some kindling.
    People alive write books or talk about dead people very often.
    I was watching a show about mathematics the other day and the narrator, very much alive, was talking about Pythagoras, Euclid, Newton, Leibniz, Gauss ... etc.
    Guess what all these great mathematicians have in common? ........ They're all dead.

    Back to topic, why wouldn't Michael Dell reminisce about that moment in history, especially since he was personally involved in it? 
    What was the name of the show? Sounds interesting. 
    Caught it in “Curiosity Stream”

    The story of Maths: Narrated by Marcus du Sautoy (2008)
    Magic Numbers: Narrated by Hannah Fry (2018)
    watto_cobra
  • Steve Jobs wanted Dell to license Mac OS

    I am glad that no deal was made with Dell.

    Michael Dell once said that if he was in charge of Apple he would shut the company down and return the money to investors.

    Dell is now worth $79.3 Billion and Apple is worth $2.3 Trillion... Go figure
    See video at about 1:30

    Hindsight is always 20/20. 
    In that same video M.Dell does say that when asked that question back in 1997, he told the reporter to ask another question twice and the third time he gave that infamous answer. So what's the big deal? Many were wrong about Apple back in 1997.
    Many of us here were using PC's / Windows. 
    watto_cobra