APPLE2c-1984

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APPLE2c-1984
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  • Apple's macOS 11 Big Sur marks the end of OS X, not the Mac

    PDRPRTS said:
    Apple said countless times.. the MacOS would never be touch-based. What we will have soon is a touch-based OS rebranded Mac. and this is not bad, from a financial and technological point of view it is not only understandable but actually very exciting. just what we will have is iOS's and iDevices take of an old paradigm we once called Macintosh. the Mac started with, and much because, of the mouse. as we shift paradigm to touch, the Mac as it has been since its inception is simply gone. What we have coming technically is better than anything Apple has done without a doubt, and perhaps it makes sense to sacrifice the Mac era for this new profitable and exciting iOS based platform. Steve Jobs said it himself, platforms peak and die. so what remains of the Mac from where i stand is essentially the name..
    (big issue might be the likely end of non App Store installs and the big saas push, but this another issue).

    By the end of this transition, we will have hyper powerful machines running something spectacular, that we will maybe call Macs, but that will likely be as different from the Mac as the Mac was from the Apple II series.
    How did you manage to come to this conclusion?


    Some time ago i shared here that although most talked about this impending transition from a "path of Catalyst"-perspective, everything in Apple's choices (but explicit communication) seemed to indicate a return to Rosetta. i was also questioned for this and went in as much detail as i could then, but really the shortest answer is that weve been here before and this has all already happened.

    Whenever Apple jumps over to a new ship, the old is soon tossed unceremoniously, regardless of any prevailing consensus. This new ARM ship was built for, and with touch in mind. it can be used with a cursor much like we can touch-control the Mac now with (and long before) Sidecar, but it doesnt need it any more than the 1984 Macintosh needed the Apple II prompt. so again for this transition we can see a very strong possibility that transitioning from the mouse might be an inevitability. of course we will be able to use a mouse but likely we will be using (and relearning) software that makes possible anything we have now, and likely infinitely more, but more easily even, and with touch. and we will be able to pull the terminal on the new machines and OS of course but id be wary of some of the new generation management who neglects to say this was always an iOS option. Jobs and Ive might have been many things but they never relied too much on wording skills.

    i strongly believe that the new Apple Silicon products will be an absolute dream given time, and that given time all that we will be forgoing in OS X and Intel will be supremely surpassed. I also believe that meanwhile the large majority of users will experience minimal to no loss. but personally i just bought a 2017 MacBook regardless of the butterfly, cause it might just be that, for some time, Mojave will be the only OS i can afford to use without having to spend a really huge amount of time and money to "keep up" (i could only use Catalina on one of my three machines but then it would be incompatible with Photos on the others). i think we we need to praise the vision for sure (the alternatives are still mostly far more complicated) but also check it - so rather than an imposition - it keeps being our vision too. otherwise no matter how many colors we are back to beige. but i always trust they will keep being this fantastic, and have always now going way past the 30 year mark since the Apple IIc. i will definitely keep up asap. cant wait too for Apples take on AR/VR.

    canukstorm
  • Apple's macOS 11 Big Sur marks the end of OS X, not the Mac

    Apple said countless times.. the MacOS would never be touch-based. What we will have soon is a touch-based OS rebranded Mac. and this is not bad, from a financial and technological point of view it is not only understandable but actually very exciting. just what we will have is iOS's and iDevices take of an old paradigm we once called Macintosh. the Mac started with, and much because, of the mouse. as we shift paradigm to touch, the Mac as it has been since its inception is simply gone. What we have coming technically is better than anything Apple has done without a doubt, and perhaps it makes sense to sacrifice the Mac era for this new profitable and exciting iOS based platform. Steve Jobs said it himself, platforms peak and die. so what remains of the Mac from where i stand is essentially the name..
    (big issue might be the likely end of non App Store installs and the big saas push, but this another issue).

    By the end of this transition, we will have hyper powerful machines running something spectacular, that we will maybe call Macs, but that will likely be as different from the Mac as the Mac was from the Apple II series.
    lkruppwatto_cobra
  • Valve abandons the macOS version of SteamVR

    PDRPRTS said:
    macxpress said:
    PDRPRTS said:
    Been having this feeling that the new ARM Mac is the beginning of the end of the Mac as we know it and this story kind of settles it - for me - as the only way this news isnt an absolute disaster. Im thinking the new Mac is not a Mac at all. The new ARM Macs may actually be iPad-laptops gradually dropping the Mac-as-we-know-it - meaning the 'macOS'. As soon as Apple guarantees major software franchises on a new 'MacPad', it has no reason to evolve the macOS layer of OS X. What we now know as Mac may be about to go the "System 9" way (Catalina does feel as clunky as System 8). Apple would be dropping a lot, but it has dropped optical-drives, audio-jacks, Motorola, IBM, beige, etc before.. each deemed as crazy as impossible at the time.. but that is Apple - it would be dropping the mouse-based GUI !! it helped champion all these years.

    Yes just like the switch to Intel was the beginning of the end of the Mac as we know it...and the switch to PPC, and from macOS 9 to macOS X, etc, etc. Every time Apple makes a major change its the beginning of the end isn't it?
    hello, not the end of the mac @macxpress, just the end of our current way of interfacing with computers - which for me hasnt happened like this since the Apple II times. of course i cant know for sure, but at this point i would bet heavily on iOS becoming the new "Mac". i was here for the Apple II to the Mac transition, then to the PowerPC, to Intel, (also from the Newton to the abyss), so i can assure you that im not predicting the end of the Mac at all, quite on the contrary: - i believe this may be the step that definitely leaves all the current competition behind for a long while, out of sheer impossibility to imitate. Final Cut and Logic are apparently getting ready for iOS, when Ableton jumps in i will not hesitate.

    slurpy said:

    Every single line of your post is insane. But the "Catalina feels as clunky as System 8" takes the absolute cake. Good job. Anyway, Steam VR is a niche within a niche. The people who used this on a mac are statistically negligible. This story does not "mean" anything, and no conclusions can be drawn from it. 
    dude this has zero to do with gaming or Steam. it is just logic. if Valve is exiting the Mac platform, this means that it sees no future for VR on the Mac, something which the Oculus guy so blatantly declared earlier too. thing is, Apple is obviously on the forefront of VR at least in planning, as what is necessary for VR is implied in AR and Apple is huge in AR, from Project Titan cars to the new iPad sensors, so that can only mean - for me - one thing.. that the transition to the new Apple form that Steve Jobs reiterated as essential countless times has already happened. and it will not be on the Mac. even it maintains the name Mac, which for marketing can work but also may not given Apple's track record. if you love Apple you know that it was built on insanity, and it has changed the world this way through the Apple I and II, Mac, iPhone, iPad, iWatch, and for me the circle may now be complete for the Mac. oh and by the way reading your comment i think you are right on one thing.. Catalina isnt like System 8, it is worse by a mile and if you work in AV production you would know what im talking about. it is absolutely unacceptable, especially if you take into account how difficult they have made it to downgrade.

    OK, so you think "the Mac-as-we-know-it" will change. That's probably inevitable, whether by evolution or revolution. Then maybe you have some other points in there, but when you say Catalina is worse than System 8, you lose all credibility. I'm not saying you have to like it, but come on!

    What are you doing in AV production that makes Catalina "unacceptable?" Relying on 32-bit apps or plug-ins maybe? Enlighten us!

    And so far as downgrade, did you research the implications of Catalina to your workflow before the upgrade? And did you do a Time Machine back-up before the upgrade? That would have made it easier to "downgrade" wouldn't it? 

    PS: you can download Mojave from the App Store : https://apps.apple.com/ph/app/macos-mojave/id1398502828?mt=12
    hi @roundaboutnow i did neglect to say i do appreciate some things in Catalina. i do like it when it works, and i find it beautiful and elegant. i have it installed in this 2012 MBP and find it amazing how it produces the highest benchmark scores it ever saw. fans tend to kick in a lot and this is an issue in recording  situations but to focus on the positive i can share that it has the best iOS integration ever for me - that is why i have it and also because i couldnt restore my library to Mojave after a week trying. it works really well for lots of stuff but, professionally it was an absolute disaster.

    to  answer your question, it destroyed previously thriving set ups on eGPUs in two machines (still unfixed), broke access to RAID arrays with no indication of when this will be solved, lots of 64-bit software stopped working with some companies still unable to put out versions that work, others putting crazy workarounds for pro set ups, and others still outright declaring they will not support Catalina. just check production forums, there is really a lot going on. this wasnt an incremental update, like the final pre-OSX systems, it is obviously made to support compatibility with iOS at the expense of the current mac user base. not to mention the whole 32-bit system thing that strictly from the Mac point of view would be very easy to support with no loss whatsoever in system performance.. 32-bit has to be actively turned off which only makes sense from an ARM perspective, and isnt actually needed now (there is an ex-Apple engineer that nearly gave me a heart attack explaining this on youtube). lots of Studios had to pay technicians (not to mention hassle and downtime) to downgrade because, unlike expectable it is hard to even create a Mojave install disk  - thx for the link but it is impossible to download 10.14 on a 10.15 machine - Catalina deletes it when the download ends. i am lucky to have another machine to do this but many arent. if you do manage to downgrade, you will notice that Catalina rendered your TimeMachine backup unusable to Mojave, for which there are hacks but again not for non-tech-minded users. if you were checking it for too long your photos library is gone and unable to downgrade for good, nor can you manage libraries, all of this being technically possible since Aperture but purposely made near-impossible unless you purchase iCloud space. other minor issues like the constant update badge reminder when all is up to date, the unsolicited activation of transferring local files to the cloud by default, etc.. and not so minor like having to upgrade lots of software, which is understandable in a way but still hard to believe how it is made to sound like it is a feature upgrade that companies had all the time to prepare for, when in reality in many cases it means rewriting apps nearly from scratch. again this only makes sense in the perspective of trying to salvage what is possible from the MacOS to integrate it in the likely new iOS "Mac"  times, and not the other way around i think.. i really believe the Mac is dead before the end of the decade, though i believe Apple will now become stronger than ever on iOS.
    elijahgdysamoriadarkvader
  • Valve abandons the macOS version of SteamVR

    Been having this feeling that the new ARM Mac is the beginning of the end of the Mac as we know it and this story kind of settles it - for me - as the only way this news isnt an absolute disaster. Im thinking the new Mac is not a Mac at all. The new ARM Macs may actually be iPad-laptops gradually dropping the Mac-as-we-know-it - meaning the 'macOS'. As soon as Apple guarantees major software franchises on a new 'MacPad', it has no reason to evolve the macOS layer of OS X. What we now know as Mac may be about to go the "System 9" way (Catalina does feel as clunky as System 8). Apple would be dropping a lot, but it has dropped optical-drives, audio-jacks, Motorola, IBM, beige, etc before.. each deemed as crazy as impossible at the time.. but that is Apple - it would be dropping the mouse-based GUI !! it helped champion all these years.
    elijahgdonjuanflyingdpElCapitanolsdarkvader
  • Lawsuit alleges Apple involved in 'flagrant' music piracy on iTunes

    Opinions may be this or that but legally the mechanical rights holders are entitled to 70 years protection after the death of the last composing artist, and for registrations predating 1978 this can go up to nearly a full century. The plaintiffs talked to Pickwick a lot, than to Apple about it, and no one did nothing for whatever undisclosed reason, so this is ultimately a question of wether a person or company has the right to defend its rights - which does seem so out of fashion these days - against corporations. A bigger player contesting the system with more money to put in may just pave the way for fairness to the rest of us, as.. .. most importantly.. this unfortunately happens a lot to many more artists (actually the great majority) who left a legacy to their kids and grandkids but - because the system is such that it often costs so much more to do anything about it legally -, corporations are effectively as-licensed to steal. No matter our admiration for companies - and i owe so much to Apple and especially Steve Jobs -, it is important to remember that most of us better think before defending the Sheriff of Nottingham as he will never ever care about us and will be out to get you next if you dont stand down your rights. Our beloved Apple barely survived Microsoft blatantly doing the same, and now it Sherlocks so much that lots have lost their livelihoods.. but all do this, especially Amazon with AWS (like Elastic Search) - all big companies steal.. it is nice to get a free new something but it always comes back to us if we dont choose our sides right.
    spheric