tycho_macuser

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tycho_macuser
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  • Apple, Huawei both using 7nm TSMC processors, beating out Qualcomm and Samsung

    Cores are, by far, the most important and difficult portion of an SoC to design. By comparison, a NPU is simple to create compared to a CPU.


    <snip>
    If it is so easy, why is Apple behind?
    Lol, wtf are you talking about???!!!
    Apple’s new NPU had 800% performance improvement over their 1st one. It’s ASTOUNDING. By far the most impressive neural chip on the planet.
    Pretending it’s “behind” anything is going to be about as difficult to convince people of as telling people Michael Phelps needs swimming lessons.
    You're tripping.
    tmayStrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Woman immortalized by 5-foot iPhone headstone in Russia

    I’m never again going to question the artistic integrity of someone I meet at a party that tells me their line of work is “death accessories”!!
    watto_cobra
  • Qualcomm shouldn't win iPhone import ban, says ITC judge

    lkrupp said:
    As I posted when this started, there was no way Apple’s products were going to be banned in the U.S. because the disruption to the economy would be catastrophic, and as the judge said, not in the public interest. It was clickbait from the get go.
    I personally dislike Qualcomm & their bullying techniques...
    But, you aren’t using the term “clickbait” remotely correct. An article is considered clickbait if it tries to misrepresent what a company is doing- to make it seem more impressive/newsworthy. In this case: Qualcomm was ABSOLUTELY seeking a ban; reporting that is not clickbait in any way, shape, or form.
    If someone wrote a title like “Apple likely will have all US sales banned!” that would be clickbait, but “Qualcomm seeks wide ban on Apple products in the US” is factually accurate & in no way sensationalism.
    rotateleftbytegatorguyjbdragonwatto_cobra
  • iPhone XS Max in greater demand than past Plus versions, says small-scale survey

    I’m coming right now from a 64gb iPhone 6S to an iPhone XR...
    At the time, I really needed a 32gb iPhone- however the options went from 16gb to 64gb.
    So, I begrudgingly ponied up the extra $100 & paid $750 for my 6S.
    Fast forward 3 years & that same $750 (now worth less, because you know... inflation), gets me another 64gb phone- that happens to have the best battery life of any iPhone ever, the very latest & most powerful processor on the planet, 50% more RAM, a 6.1” screen vs. 4.7”, etc.
    All for the exact same price, & even a smidge less- if you factor in inflation.
    I’m doing whatever the opposite of gasping is, over this price!!!!!
    #pleasedaspunch
    watto_cobra
  • A year with Apple's 10.5-inch iPad Pro: the ideal worker's tablet

    JWSC said:
    entropys said:
    ...  It needs to work with a full hierarchical file directory. Access to directories is a problem in real world use.  This is simply because workplace file systems and servers ARE organised that way. ...
    Don’t disagree with most of what you say.  But what makes you conclude that, from a users point of view, user management within an HFS structure or management within a relational database are mutually exclusive?  Who says tags within a file’s record in a relational database could not include HFS location data?

    As we go into the future with ‘big data’ I’ll ask again, how is the user supposed to handle millions of files down the road?  I’m not buying any argument that implies that HFS is in any way appropriate for handling so much data.
    What do YOU think “big data” means? Lol.
    I’ve only ever heard that term in reference to how companies like IBM, Google, etc. are using machine learning to look through enormous data sets for decision making, such as autonomous driving choices, made from untold amounts of simoultaneous sensor data & the like.
    All this sensor data obviously wouldn’t be stored in user folders to be casually perused as you’re looking through your downloads.
    I haven’t heard any mention of this new paradigm shift, where we are going to move from the several important folders we’ve had for the last 30+ years (my documents, my downloads, etc.) each with maybe a few hundred files, suddenly to thousands of folders w/ millions of files.
    Wtf are you talking about?? 
    Please describe to me the “millions” of files I’m going going to need to swiftly individually access via a file manager on my iOS device in the near future.
    radarthekat[Deleted User]dewme