mayfly

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mayfly
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  • 'Masters of the Air' WWII miniseries set to debut on Apple TV+ in January

    Xed said:
    mayfly said:
    "Masters of the Air" promises to be one of the great WWII miniseries we'll all remember. But it will be missing the most important element of "Band of Brothers" and "The Pacific." Those were able to end with interviews of the actual heroes who were involved in those gut-wrenching, heartbreaking battles. Many of Easy Company and the First Marine Division were still alive to tell their stories. It's too late for that now, and I'll miss that aspect. Unless of course they recorded their stories for the Pritzker Military Museum in Chicago or in some other venue. If you're ever in Chicago, this is a must. There's an overwhelming collection of material, letters, videos, audio recordings of the heroes from all our combat actions, from the Revolutionary War up to the present. There's an enormous library, recruiting posters, anything you can think of.

    Can't wait to see how Apple pulls this one off, and hope we can look forward to a comparable series on Vietnam. "We Were Soldiers" was a very disappointing realization of Hal Moore's book. (The Ken Burns documentary is the best I've seen, but I had nightmares after seeing the episode featuring the story of one Tunnel Rat).
    So it may be missing, not will be?
    If a WWII pilot was 20 years old in 1945, that would make him 98 years old now. And there weren't that many 20 year old officers (required for pilots). Surviving pilots would now be over 100 years old, some way over 100. There may be one or two, but here in Chicago, the last known Tuskeegee Airman, Oscar Lawton Wilkerson Jr. (a bomber pilot) died this year. He told his story at the Pritzker Military Museum, and you can hear it if you visit.
    watto_cobra
  • 'Masters of the Air' WWII miniseries set to debut on Apple TV+ in January

    "Masters of the Air" promises to be one of the great WWII miniseries we'll all remember. But it will be missing the most important element of "Band of Brothers" and "The Pacific." Those were able to end with interviews of the actual heroes who were involved in those gut-wrenching, heartbreaking battles. Many of Easy Company and the First Marine Division were still alive to tell their stories. It's too late for that now, and I'll miss that aspect. Unless of course they recorded their stories for the Pritzker Military Museum in Chicago or in some other venue. If you're ever in Chicago, this is a must. There's an overwhelming collection of material, letters, videos, audio recordings of the heroes from all our combat actions, from the Revolutionary War up to the present. There's an enormous library, recruiting posters, anything you can think of.

    Can't wait to see how Apple pulls this one off, and hope we can look forward to a comparable series on Vietnam. "We Were Soldiers" was a very disappointing realization of Hal Moore's book. (The Ken Burns documentary is the best I've seen, but I had nightmares after seeing the episode featuring the story of one Tunnel Rat).
    FileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Future MacBook Pro could split at the hinge and be truly modular

    Solution in search of a problem. If I want a touchscreen, I'll use my iPad. And the only time I ever use it is on vacation, when I don't want to bring the MacBook Air. I think touchscreens are one of the most disgusting pieces of technology ever invented. Ever look at any of your touchscreens after even one day of use? Including the one on your car? Covered with grease, oil, flakes of dead skin…my 2013 Volvo S60 is the last one without one, and I'm keeping it until the wheels fall off.
    darkvaderFileMakerFeller
  • Russian court rejects Apple's App Store antitrust appeal

    mayfly said:
    The more the Russian government tries to damage Apple, the more Russian citizens will want iPhones. And need them, given the Putin dictatorship's suppression of civil rights. Fire up those iPhones, use those VPNs, free Navalny. MOSCOW SPRING!
    Russia has just tried to ban VPN's again. This is an ongoing battle with the FSB/KGB that goes back to when Putin first became the 'Dear Leader'. 
    "Tried" is the operative word there. VPN's can be hosted anywhere if you know how to set up a proxy server or 10. Probably easier to just move to Poland.
    watto_cobra
  • Developers take note: Apple Silicon is required to develop apps for visionOS

    saarek said:
    sevenfeet said:
    dewme said:
    If Apple follows a timeline similar to the one they followed for the PPC to Intel switchover, shouldn’t we expect to see Apple shipping an Apple Silicon only macOS around the 3-year mark, dropping support for Rosetta 2 around the 5-year mark, and obsoleting the last Intel Macs around the 7-year mark?

    Following precedent is always a defensible strategy, no matter how badly you feel about the expensive machine you bought three years ago. Power PC Mac owners got over it and so will Intel Mac owners.

    Depending on whether they use the date when the Apple Silicon transition kits were made available or the date when the first M1 products were available, or split the difference, I think this would hint that whatever macOS Apple ships in the Fall of 2024 would be a fully defensible target for dropping native Intel support in macOS. Likewise, we should anticipate Rosetta 2 getting the boot from macOS in Fall 2026. 

    Finally, it’s important to recognize that the useful service life of your Mac does not end when your Mac no longer supports the latest version of macOS. Sure, you have to pay attention to security related concerns, but the Mac you bought five years ago is still superb at doing everything you bought it to do at the time and for at least a few years beyond that point. I’m still very happy using my Late 2012 iMac. It’s still my primary platform for running VMs for Intel Windows and Linux operating systems. Still performs as well as it ever did, which is good enough for me.
    Past is not always prologue but it's a good start. The last G5 Mac, the iMac G5 was launched in October 2005. Steve Jobs then shocked the industry with the beginning of the Intel transition in January 2006, much earlier than predicted and making the iMac G5 an instant lame duck machine after only 90 days.. That iMac ran 10.4 Tiger and ended with 10.5 Leopard. But unlike now where macOS updates are yearly, Tiger began in April 2005 lasting until October 2007 and Leopard went from October 2007 to August 2009.

    These days the typical life for a Mac in terms of getting macOS updates is about 5-6 years and the Pro towers lasting 8 years from original GA release. The last Intel Macs were the 2019 Mac Pro, the 2020 Macbook Air (April 2020), the 2020 Macbook Pro (May 2020) and the 2020 iMac (August 2020). So all of these machines began on a version of 10.15 Catalina with Big Sur not launching until November 2020 with the first M1 Macbook Air.

    So I could see all of those Intel Macs getting between 1-3 more releases past the most recent Sonoma, which would mean that we'd see a transition away from Intel as early as 2025. I don't think that the current 2019 Mac Pro will get 8 years of updates this time. I also do not think that 2024 is in the cards since I think Apple will tell developers (and customers) a year out when Intel support for new releases will be sunset and despite this note on Vision Pro support, Apple did not indicate a transition schedule during WWDC 2023. I do think Rosetta will stick around longer, perhaps up to 3 additional years to accommodate some older professional apps and plugins.
    To this day I’m pissed off that Apple did not release Snow Leopard for PowerPC, especially as they had a working build of it.

    My G5 Quad deserved that final update.
    Your G5 Quad would have melted from its own heat 5 years ago. That's why they were never able to put it in a laptop.
    watto_cobra