tenthousandthings

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tenthousandthings
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  • Apple debuts new $5999 Mac Pro with up to 28-core Xeon processors

    KITA said:
    KidGloves said:
    Looks amazing though I would like to see how the likely crippled $5999 version compares to similar PC workstations. I can't help thinking that the Apple Tax is back with a bang. The stuff looks like it's fantastically engineered (probably over the top for 90%). Anyone want to guess how much RAM the $5999 version will ship with?
    We're talking a base version that's DOUBLE the price of the current base. That's a big jump in anyone's book.
    An HP Z4 with the last-generation (=Skylake) 8 Core Xeon-W (i.e., W-2145) with 1000W chassis, 2x10Gb Ethernet, 32 GB (4x8) of RAM, 256 GB NVMe SSD, and AMD Radeon Pro WX 7100 with 8 GB is $6965.

    So that thinking is wrong. 
    That's an extremely misleading comparison using a website price for a platform that originally launched in 2017 with superior NVIDIA options, a massive list of ISV certifications and an included 3 years of on-site warranty.
    It’s not misleading at all. The point of the comparison is to show the current pricing of the closest parallel configuration offered by HP. When the Cascade Lake configurations for the Z4s with Xeon-W and the current Radeon Pro become available, they’ll be similarly priced. The point is that Apple is not price gouging here — this is what these machines cost. I’m not knocking the HP — the 2019 edition of this machine will be impressive — it just won’t be much cheaper than the Mac Pro.
    docno42fastasleepcityguide
  • Apple debuts new $5999 Mac Pro with up to 28-core Xeon processors

    KidGloves said:
    Looks amazing though I would like to see how the likely crippled $5999 version compares to similar PC workstations. I can't help thinking that the Apple Tax is back with a bang. The stuff looks like it's fantastically engineered (probably over the top for 90%). Anyone want to guess how much RAM the $5999 version will ship with?
    We're talking a base version that's DOUBLE the price of the current base. That's a big jump in anyone's book.
    An HP Z4 with the last-generation (=Skylake) 8 Core Xeon-W (i.e., W-2145) with 1000W chassis, 2x10Gb Ethernet, 32 GB (4x8) of RAM, 256 GB NVMe SSD, and AMD Radeon Pro WX 7100 with 8 GB is $6965.

    So that thinking is wrong. 
    roundaboutnowwelshdogmacplusplusJWSCfastasleepanomewatto_cobracityguide
  • Apple in 2019: surviving iPhone challenges like the 1990s Microsoft

    Rayer said:
    This article talks about Apple avoiding the mistakes Microsoft made in the past so it can stay ahead of the game and be prosperous, but completely ignores the fact that Apple wouldn't be around today if Microsoft hadn't infused $120 million into the company 20 years ago.
    If you think Bill Gates did that out of the goodness of his heart I've got a bridge in Brooklyn for you to invest in. The $150 million stock buy was minor compared to the other major concession from Microsoft -- an agreement to provide five years of MS Office software for Mac OS -- massively important because those five years would encompass the transition to Rhapsody/OS X, which of course laid the foundation for Apple, Inc. Without that agreement, the project might well have failed.

    In exchange, Gates got Jobs to drop Apple's long-running suit against Microsoft. If you think that was nothing, that Apple had no leverage and Microsoft was not exposed since they had won a couple of the early rounds, again, it's really a beautiful bridge...

    [Note: Apple's agreement to support Internet Explorer for those five years was also a critical component of the deal for Microsoft as they fended off the threat from Netscape the author describes at the start of this article.]
    designrbakedbananas
  • Apple's powerful new Mac mini perfectly suits the 'Pro' market, yet the complaints have al...

    polymnia said:
    This is a hostile, lopsided article that fails to understand users needs.

    I am no Mac Mini enthusiast or buyer, but I can relate to the user’s arguments of a reasonably cost effective Mac for those who aren’t seeking portability and who already own a monitor, keyboard etc. For Apple to slap them with such high prices is not going to go well. There should’ve been a well configured option for $499, then charge whatever  for the pro. They sure know how to pull off such options for the iPad. 
    Apple charging high prices won’t go well for them? Do you hear yourself? That’s exactly what Apple does! And they’ve been quite successful. 
    Also, $799 is not a bad base price in 2018. $599 was the base price from 2005 through 2012 (it went up to $699 briefly in 2010). The only Mac mini ever with a base price of $499 was the 2014 edition. So basically in 2014 they did what Bloggerblog suggests and it failed.
    stompymacplusplusandrewj5790magman1979PickUrPoison
  • Apple's Mac mini now inexcusably getting trounced by cheap Intel hardware

    geirnoklebye said:
    ... I happen to know what goes into the development of the products and how the future product plans are laid out years in advance. I know that not updating a product for multiple years usually means the product is EOL or there is a serious creativity crisis in product development/management. ... the decimation of the ecosystem around macOS signals a company in crisis that no longer are able to create and inspire in the product segment that still carries the company (in that all products rely on code generated on macOS). 

    ... The Apple user base is people looking for the ease of use that has been the hallmark of Apple's system integration in their own ecosystem, and now that base are thrown to each on their own to figure out how to make their system work across system upgrades, diverse components and time. 

    Tim Cook stands at the risk of throwing out the very core base that was willing to pay a premium price exactly for that integrated environment where all worked.  They came to Apple either because they did not have the time to tinker around or they simply had no interest in the technical issues as they were focused on other, to them more important things, where the Mac became their tool for expression, creativity and business development. 
    If not for the three (IIRC) relatively recent "vague promises" (to quote Mike, the article's author) re: the Mac mini directly from Cook and other executives, most people here would assume the mini is EOL. However, although the promises themselves were vague, they were not anonymous. So I do think something is happening with the mini.

    The question is what? Mike thinks we're "tilting at windmills" if we think we'll be getting easy access to memory and storage in the new mini. He's probably correct, given recent decisions, like the 4K iMac.

    As for the "decimation of the ecosystem around macOS," I'm not sure I agree, unless you don't consider iOS to be part of that ecosystem. Yes, in terms of hardware, a line was drawn at Airport, and now in addition to the non-Apple modem I've always had, I'm going to (eventually) have to choose a non-Apple router/wi-fi network. But the care and attention given to MacBook/MacBook Pro and iMac/iMac Pro is a good foundation for things to come. Add to that the 2019 Mac Pro and at least one forthcoming Thunderbolt 3 Display, and there's just one major gap remaining: the non-Pro "Mac."

    The Mac "mini" has kinda, sorta fit into this space if you squint at it -- Jobs seemed to see it that way, as the successor to the NeXT cube and the G4 Cube. The Intel/AMD hardware showcased in the NUC discussed in this article would fit the bill, obviously, sitting neatly between laptop and desktop.

    Mike doesn't mention one key drawback in the Hades Canyon NUC -- it uses an older Thunderbolt 3 controller, Alpine Ridge, rather than the new Titan Ridge, which Anandtech describes as follows: "The new Titan Ridge family of controllers pick up where Intel's previous Alpine Ridge controllers left off by incorporating new DisplayPort [1.4] functionality, and for the first time, a USB-C fallback mode when used as a sink/peripheral device. This mid-generation update for Thunderbolt 3 will allow the standard and devices using the new Titan Ridge controllers to catch up with current display standards, and work better with the next generation of UHD displays."

    It's not crazy to think Apple is waiting for DisplayPort 1.4 in Thunderbolt 3 with Titan Ridge, and we should all just relax. The new mini needs to be able to comfortably support Apple's forthcoming Thunderbolt 3 Display(s), above all.

    Finally, a personal data point. My sister, the NYC architect I've mentioned before in these discussions about the mini, finally gave up waiting to replace her 2012 Mac minis along with her ancient (2007) Dell displays, and went iMac this year. It's fine, not a problem, but it's worth pointing out that she's now in the iMac world, and her days of her office running Vectorworks on (two generations of) Mac minis are over. I guess that's one reason why Apple didn't care to refresh the mini -- a lot of users were switching to iMacs (and MacBooks). The exodus/return to Windows that is so often held up here as a consequence of such decisions isn't altogether real, at least in the case of my sister, for whom the choice "iMac or Windows" was a no-brainer.
    axcoatlelijahgandrewj5790cgWerks