crowley

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crowley
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  • M1X Mac mini with more ports could launch within months

    MplsP said:
    JBSlough said:
    MplsP said:
    stompy said:
    darkpaw said:
    I don't get why we'd ever need MagSafe on a desktop computer? For a laptop, great; someone comes along and treads on the cable, it pulls it out without breaking the port on the laptop or pulling the laptop to the floor, and the laptop continues running on battery power.
    Apple describes the M1 iMac magnetic power connector as "A power connector that easily attaches via magnets", where (retired) MacBook MagSafe was an easily disconnected magnetic power connection. I get that it's easy to conflate the two, most people did when Apple introduced the 2021 iMac; adding to that, Apple has never said "Hey, this isn't MagSafe".

    The day the iMac went on sale, reviewer Jason Snell compared the new iMac power cord to the old: "In practical terms, the force required to yank the magnetic power cable off the iMac is the same force required to yank the current iMac’s plastic power plug out of its socket."

    Unless we're going to start referring to non-magnetic designs as "FrictionSafe", we should agree to only call products MagSafe that Apple calls MagSafe.
    So what’s the point of using magnets, then, especially for a desktop. How often do you plug/unplug a desktop’s power cord? Was the cord for the imac really that difficult or an issue in any way? Nope. Magnets are just a more expensive (and resource intensive) way of doing the same thing. 

    I believe the point was how thin the iMac is. After I looked at one in a Best Buy I realized there wouldn’t be room for the standard way they were connected before. It’s literally just a screen and almost as thin as an iPad. 
    crowley said:
    MplsP said:

    Was the cord for the imac really that difficult or an issue in any way? Nope. 
    Actually yep, the C13-14 coupling and  connector is deeper than the the iMac so, in much the same way as with USB-A and ethernet, the form factor of the iMac meant it was not a possibility, they needed something else.

    Also, the C13-14 pair is only normally used for devices with onboard PSUs, which the iMac couldn't have without dramatic changes to the design.  Without a PSU, the connector type is pretty open season, there's loads of them.
    True - making it 11.5 mm thick raises some issues, but only if you make them so. Heck, they could have just made it a USB C cable.
    The iMacs draw somewhere around 70-80W of power, meaning that if it was powered by a USB-C cable (currently a 100W maximum) you'd be limited in power supply to any attached devices.  Possibly not a problem for many, but it'd be a bit of an embarrassing limitation for a desktop machine.  Not to mention that they probably want the same or similar design for the bigger iMac that is surely coming, which will likely have a significantly higher power draw.  The PSU that they're shipping is 143W.
    FileMakerFellerfastasleepwatto_cobra
  • M1X Mac mini with more ports could launch within months

    MplsP said:

    Was the cord for the imac really that difficult or an issue in any way? Nope. 
    Actually yep, the C13-14 coupling and  connector is deeper than the the iMac so, in much the same way as with USB-A and ethernet, the form factor of the iMac meant it was not a possibility, they needed something else.

    Also, the C13-14 pair is only normally used for devices with onboard PSUs, which the iMac couldn't have without dramatic changes to the design.  Without a PSU, the connector type is pretty open season, there's loads of them.
    cgWerksFileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Tech industry needs to rebuild user trust after privacy losses, says Tim Cook


    At the very least, when you sell people out, be honest about it. 
    Apple aren't selling out.  There is no money being exchanged for their child abuses initiatives.  That's the difference between the privacy invasions of Google and Facebook and the things that Apple are doing, Apple do not profit, they are not profiling you, they are not using your data in any way that advantages themselves.  The "privacy invasions" of Apple amount to checking that you aren't committing a heinous crime, and when a piece of on-device code that exists solely for that purpose determines that you aren't, you go on your way, totally unaffected. 

    I wonder how many of those complaining about this privacy invasiveness are fully in favour of stop and frisk policies.  Now that's invasiveness.
    fastasleeppscooter639secondkox2n2itivguyWgkruegerAlex_V
  • Tim Robbins joins cast of Apple TV+ original series 'Wool'

    That silver fox looks a fair bit like Julian Assange nowadays.
    mknelson
  • Hackers selling data on 100M T-Mobile customers after server attack

    Dogperson said:
    Not just this company, but ALL the personal info hacks - WHY IS NONE OF THIS INFORMATION ENCRYPTED???????
    Great question. Why is none of your information encrypted on iCloud? We know it isn't because Apple can scan your photos for illegal images and then have humans review them before sending all your data unencrypted to the government.
    You sure are wrong a lot: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT202303

    DataEncryptionNotes
    In transitOn server
    BackupYesYesA minimum of 128-bit AES encryption
    Safari History & BookmarksYesYes
    CalendarsYesYes
    ContactsYesYes
    Find My (Devices & People)YesYes
    iCloud DriveYesYes
    Messages in iCloudYesYes
    NotesYesYes
    PhotosYesYes
    RemindersYesYes
    Siri ShortcutsYesYes
    Voice MemosYesYes
    Wallet passesYesYes
    I believe much or all of that is encrypted with keys that Apple have though, not with end to end user keys, so theoretically Apple could unencrypt it and share it with law enforcement.  A pretty compelling reason from a consumer standpoint to switch to full end to end encryption and shift any validation to on-device systems.
    ronn