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Hardware makers plan preemptive strike against Apple tablet at CES

post #1 of 166
Thread Starter 
As CES kicks off this week, a great deal of focus will be on touchscreen tablet devices, which many companies plan to release in anticipation of Apple's own take on the mobile computing format.

Highlighted by BusinessWeek was the Notion Ink, a new 10.1-inch touchscreen tablet set to debut at CES 2010 in Las Vegas. A prototype of the device will reportedly be shown, and the company's CEO said he hopes to launch the product before Apple's own tablet debuts.

As the Jan. 7 start for CES approaches, many hardware makers seem to have the same philosophy, hoping to steal some of Apple's thunder before it announces its long-awaited, still unconfirmed tablet. Reports have said Apple has scheduled an event for Jan. 26 at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco to debut new products. Rumored to appear is an Apple tablet, perhaps called the iSlate.

Another possible product debut could come from Apple's rival to the north, Microsoft. Last summer, concept art of a dual-screen book-like device known as the Courier leaked to the Internet. The Redmond, Wash., company has not publicly commented on the rumored hardware.

PC maker Dell also reportedly plans to unveil its own tablet at CES. The Texas company is said to have plans for a touchscreen device with a 5-inch screen based on the Google Android mobile operating system.

Monday, Austin, Tex.-based company Freescale Semiconductor announced a new 7-inch reference design for touchscreen tablets. The company hopes that devices less than $200 utilizing ARM processors could be created from its plans. A hardware prototype based on the form factor will be shown at CES this week.

Freescale Semiconductor's proposed tablet reference design will debut this week.

"Freescales new tablet opens the door to an exciting new world of compelling form factors specifically designed and optimized to support common online activities including social media, high-quality audio/video playback and light gaming," said Henri Richard, senior vice president of Sales and Marketing for Freescale.

"We believe the tablet will emerge as a popular form factor for the next generation of smartbooks. By introducing this prototype reference design, Freescale intends to play a vital role in propelling the mainstream adoption of smartbooks."

In recent weeks, rumors over Apple's tablet have once again picked up steam. Last week, the former president of Google China, Lee Kai-fu said that the device combines the functions of a netbook, the Amazon Kindle, and an e-book reader. Citing an unnamed source, he claims Apple has high hopes for the device, expecting it to sell 10 million in its first year at a price under $1,000.

Last July, AppleInsider first reported that Apple's tablet would debut in the first quarter of 2010. The 10-inch, 3G-enabled device is said to be the brainchild of chief executive Steve Jobs.
post #2 of 166
Going out on a limb - It will not be called iSlate. In fact it won't be called "i" anything.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #3 of 166
Quote:
...a great deal of focus will be on touchscreen tablet devices, which many companies plan to release in anticipation of Apple's own take on the mobile computing format.

It's more like the entire industry is looking to release a tablet device and Apple's will be better than everyone's else's.

Apple's device will cater to the eye candy loving home consumer better, the rest of the industry will make more serious looking and better functional devices that cater to the business market.

Same approach, different product, same story.

Mac/PC iPhone/Blackberry iTablet/TabletPC's
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post #4 of 166
makes me want to puke.

No. Actually, not puke. I just find it very drab and boring. Like, the "reference design" photos. What is up with that?

Thank God Apple makes the personal computing industry fun and exciting.
post #5 of 166
Good luck to the "competition", such that it is. When Apple releases their tablet it's back to the drawing board.
post #6 of 166
I am waiting to see what Apple's price point will be. I think a tablet will be great, and knowing Apple their product will be awesome but I do not want to spend a fortune on it. If the competition can come in well under Apple on price, I will forgo a few bells and whistles to save a few hundred bucks. On the other hand if the gap is very small then Apple all the way.
post #7 of 166
It doesn't matter that others might launch their tablets first. They've been launching them for years anyhow.

Apple was a latecomer to the MP3 player and smartphone markets and now look at where they are. Being first to market is not all that it's cracked up to be.

At least that's the opinion of one Apple shareholder.
post #8 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregnacu View Post

Something about the PC industry makes me want to puke.

No. Actually, not puke. I just find it very drab and boring. Like, the "reference design" photos. What is up with that?

Thank God Apple makes the personal computing industry fun and exciting.


Different markets.

Apple caters to the home consumers, that's their market and they fight hard against any competition in that area. Their products are designed with a high lust factor and invoke impulsive purchases and even theft. Some people even buy Apple's hardware with no real need for the device itself, rather just to buy a new toy.

The iPods in their various forms and price points are high on the list of impulsive purchases. Many people bought them not even knowing it required a computer to use them. (reports are this holiday season iPods sold extremely well)

Apple cares less about the drab market, businesses like drab because it's serious and employees don't steal the hardware.

Businesses look at computer and software purchases with a critical eye for the bottom line, getting the most value for their money, looks are not really important, except in their creative departments. Businesses are in business to make money, not spend it on a whim if a device changes color or gets a new feature like emotional appealing consumer would.

Apple changed their name from Apple Computer for a reason, they are planing on exiting the computer industry and focusing on being a consumer products company that makes devices people can easily use, not much anymore on real computers that require a lot of thought and a steep learning curve.

The iPhone and the App Store are just the beginning. The iTablet/iSlate is next...

OS X UI is going to be shown the door as soon as the bulk of people start buying these new 'iPhone like' closed UI devices from Apple.
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post #9 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hellacool View Post

I am waiting to see what Apple's price point will be. I think a tablet will be great, and knowing Apple their product will be awesome but I do not want to spend a fortune on it. If the competition can come in well under Apple on price, I will forgo a few bells and whistles to save a few hundred bucks. On the other hand if the gap is very small then Apple all the way.

The $200 tablet with the 7 inch screen looks great. Archos makes a 7 inch internet/media tablet running Android. I bought the pre-Android 5 inch model, which has an 800x480 screen and which outputs 720p to the TV. It is great for surfing the net and plugging into the Home Theater system. It has a 60 Gig drive, and is available with a 500 Gig drive. It uses the same CPU as the iPhone 3GS, so it is very fast.

I have wanted a cheap device for surfing in bed or on the couch for a long time, and the Archos comes close to being perfect. I am happy to see that the category is heating up. I hope Apple and all the rest put resources into this sort of form factor, even if it is not a full-power computer, but instead, a purpose-built internet/media device.
post #10 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

It doesn't matter that others might launch their tablets first. They've been launching them for years anyhow.

Apple was a latecomer to the MP3 player and smartphone markets and now look at where they are. Being first to market is not all that it's cracked up to be.

At least that's the opinion of one Apple shareholder.

I agree. Apple was not first in the MP3 player market, but came
to dominate it. Same thing might happen in the tablet space.

They are not dominating the phone space, however, but instead are in third place.

And on the desktop, their sales are dwarfed by alternative choices.

But all they really care about is the bottom line, and at this point, they are doing well there.
post #11 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by iGenius View Post


But all they really care about is the bottom line, and at this point, they are doing well there.

Wow, you sound like you're complaining that, in the process, Apple may have let down the consumer! Surely that's not what you mean?
post #12 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Going out on a limb - It will not be called iSlate. In fact it won't be called "i" anything.

Interesting. Any reason why you think that might be? (I am still sticking with iTab).
post #13 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post

Many people bought them not even knowing it required a computer to use them...

Sadly I know one of these people. I was all I could do not to laugh in the poor dudes face when he said: "I bought this iPod, where is all the music?"

He freaked out when I told him he had to install iTunes on his PC, buy the music and then put it on the iPod.

I wish I were joking.
post #14 of 166
Never have I seen so many entering a market trying to make a few bucks before Apple enters. There will be a huge shakeout until all well-thought out and well-positioned products have found their level.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #15 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hellacool View Post

I am waiting to see what Apple's price point will be. I think a tablet will be great, and knowing Apple their product will be awesome but I do not want to spend a fortune on it. If the competition can come in well under Apple on price, I will forgo a few bells and whistles to save a few hundred bucks. On the other hand if the gap is very small then Apple all the way.

I predict the price point will be over a thousand bucks. We are talking about the same company that made the MacBook Air. $1800 bucks, no DVD drive, no ethernet, no firewire, etc. But sexy as hell.

And lest we forget the original iPhone. $500 bucks, no physical keyboard, no 3G, no GPS, no video. But sexy as hell.

The iTab (my favorite name) will retail for $1500 bucks, be missing features other tablets have and will probably be tied to AT&T for it's content. I hope not, but probably so.
post #16 of 166
We already saw it all. 3GS was not really an omen for the end-user; yet it managed well enough to annihilate the Pre launch.
Now what happens if there is no Apple's tablet at all??

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #17 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hellacool View Post

I am waiting to see what Apple's price point will be. I think a tablet will be great, and knowing Apple their product will be awesome but I do not want to spend a fortune on it. If the competition can come in well under Apple on price, I will forgo a few bells and whistles to save a few hundred bucks. On the other hand if the gap is very small then Apple all the way.

or just wait until you can install a hackin-touch OS on your non-apple tablet...
:-D * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
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:-D * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
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post #18 of 166
It won't make any real difference. I'm very confident that the Apple Tablet will be strong enough in functionality and usability that it will knock out the competition, and it will leave them scrambling to develop similar features. That should put them at least a good 9-12 months behind. I'm sure there will be something from Apple that will surprise everyone. As the article below from BusinessWeek indicates, most people did not count on a touch screen for the iPhone before it was released:

http://finance.yahoo.com/family-home...et-at-the-door

If there is one thing that may work against Apple, it is the price point. We'll have to see Apple comes out with. I'm hoping all the wait and delays were due to getting the price (as well as the functionality) right. Hopefully, we'll be shocked about the price as indicated in the article below:

http://www.alltabletnews.com/2009/12...ckingly-cheap/
post #19 of 166
the tMac..
post #20 of 166
I love how people still take Microsoft's CGI doodles as proof of a potential product.

The Courier doesn't exist.
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My Android phone is the worst phone I've ever owned.
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post #21 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by sticknick View Post

Sadly I know one of these people. I was all I could do not to laugh in the poor dudes face when he said: "I bought this iPod, where is all the music?"

He freaked out when I told him he had to install iTunes on his PC, buy the music and then put it on the iPod.

I wish I were joking.

I had a guy who bought 5 iPods, one for each of his four daughters (must been trying hard for a son) and one for his wife.

His only computer (and sanctuary) was a PC in his private home office and at that time iTune's required a separate Windows account for each iPod user.

Poor guy.
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post #22 of 166
How do you compete against something that does not exist \
post #23 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by knightlie View Post

I love how people still take Microsoft's CGI doodles as proof of a potential product.

The Courier doesn't exist.

If MS can't steal the spotlight with an actual product, might as well try with fake ones.

Aside from the jab at MS, in all seriousness, Apple will release a tablet, it'll be like nothing else out there, the tablet market will be reinvented, and MS will release a poor copy two years later when the rest of the market has already moved way beyond it.

MS' strategy:

post #24 of 166
There is going to be a lot of new, very nice looking tablets showing up on the market, but the biggest advantage that Apple has and everyone already knows about, is Itunes. Itunes is what has made the Ipod and Iphone so successful. I'm sure that Itunes is going to be redesigned to accommodate the new device. All of the apps that are available to the Iphone will probably be available to the new device plus there will probably be new sectors in Itunes to accommodate the new increased demands for the former print media. The way magazines, blogs, newspapers, and books have been available is going to change drastically.

Itunes is going to be a "one source" place for people to get all of their digital media.
post #25 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregnacu View Post

I just find it very drab and boring. Like, the "reference design" photos. What is up with that?

Thank God Apple makes the personal computing industry fun and exciting.

Agreed!

That Freescale photo, if a true mock-up makes the tablet look like it belongs in the toy section at the Dollar Store! Too Fisher-Price looking... apologies to Fisher-Price!

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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post #26 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post

Different markets.

Apple caters to the home consumers, that's their market and they fight hard against any competition in that area. Their products are designed with a high lust factor and invoke impulsive purchases and even theft. Some people even buy Apple's hardware with no real need for the device itself, rather just to buy a new toy.

The iPods in their various forms and price points are high on the list of impulsive purchases. Many people bought them not even knowing it required a computer to use them. (reports are this holiday season iPods sold extremely well)

Apple cares less about the drab market, businesses like drab because it's serious and employees don't steal the hardware.

Businesses look at computer and software purchases with a critical eye for the bottom line, getting the most value for their money, looks are not really important, except in their creative departments. Businesses are in business to make money, not spend it on a whim if a device changes color or gets a new feature like emotional appealing consumer would.

One of the top ten lamest Apple critiques of the last decade (assuming of course you weren't being sarcastic.

Looking at your argument objectively: if businesses we're truly looking at getting the most value for their money as you say, then ALL businesses would be using Apple products, since they've been shown for years now to have the best TCO (Total Cost of Ownership) by far, saving many Mac-based companies hundreds of hours in productivity and thousands -if not millions- of dollars in IT costs. There are plenty of stories in the business world of companies who have switched to Apple technology and in the process saving boatloads of money in IT costs because of it.

Point is there are several REAL reasons many companies continue to use MS products, but that's slowly but surely starting to change.
post #27 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by primedetailer View Post

There is going to be a lot of new, very nice looking tablets showing up on the market, but the biggest advantage that Apple has and everyone already knows about, is Itunes. Itunes is what has made the Ipod and Iphone so successful. I'm sure that Itunes is going to be redesigned to accommodate the new device. All of the apps that are available to the Iphone will probably be available to the new device plus there will probably be new sectors in Itunes to accommodate the new increased demands for the former print media. The way magazines, blogs, newspapers, and books have been available is going to change drastically.

Itunes is going to be a "one source" place for people to get all of their digital media.


Exactly, even if the competition makes a better tablet, the combination of iTunes/App Store with Apple's closed UI will make the iSlate/iTablet experience superior to the competition.

Of course the drawback will be that one has to "jailbreak" their iTablet to run software that Apple won't sell, like ad blockers or privacy and security features.

You either take what Apple gives you or your off on your own and fighting Apple and losing features like access to iTunes and approved apps.

This is the new world of DRM, not by software, but by exclusion and product design. This is another reason why I say BlueRay isn't coming to Mac's at all. Once one gets the hardware out on a massive scale, someone will find a way to bypass the DRM in software.
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post #28 of 166
Its a fact that apple has a leg up on these other competitor markets, they have osx, and we all know how much Apple cares about aesthetics and functionality, unlike its competitors. We will see the obvious things, multiple slate devices hit the streets, but only Apple will walk away with the successful product done the right way. Besides, it took apple over 5 years to make this product, what did apples competitors do? they heard apple was putting out a slate mobile device, so they whipped something up in an R & D lab in 6 months to rush it out ahead of apple, good game.
post #29 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post

How do you compete against something that does not exist \



By clapping with one hand, I suppose.......
post #30 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Going out on a limb - It will not be called iSlate. In fact it won't be called "i" anything.

"iBook" would be ace though. It would fit right in between the iPod touch/iPhone and the macbook.

If not, "Newton" would be a very brave statement. A historic reference to what used to be a pioneering product.

iSlate doesn't turn me on. I can already hear the "I slate" jokes or the headlines "iSlate slated " in the printed media.
post #31 of 166
I thought menus were gone for good when we went to touchscreens. Guess not, thanks to these photos of these competing tablets from those same PC makers? I have a feeling that the Apple tablet WON'T contain menus. indeed, Apple will be smart enough not to market it as a full computer like the Macbook, but rather a great computer for these who like to do basic things (email, web, photos) easily, and then some. Just don't expect it'll rival the Macbook in performance
post #32 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hellacool View Post

... If the competition can come in well under Apple on price, I will forgo a few bells and whistles to save a few hundred bucks..

That's exactly the point that the competition misses every time.
They think its all about 'bells and whistles' and pack in features instead of usability.
Its not Apple that mistakes a features list for design.
post #33 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by csimmons View Post

Looking at your argument objectively: if businesses we're truly looking at getting the most value for their money as you say, then ALL businesses would be using Apple products, since they've been shown for years now to have the best TCO (Total Cost of Ownership) by far, saving many Mac-based companies hundreds of hours in productivity and thousands -if not millions- of dollars in IT costs. There are plenty of stories in the business world of companies who have switched to Apple technology and in the process saving boatloads of money in IT costs because of it.

Point is there are several REAL reasons many companies continue to use MS products, but that's slowly but surely starting to change.


Like your optimism but here are the facts.

Businesses who need to hire IT personal usually to fix other things besides Windows.

Even a company filled with just Mac's needs IT personnel, to maintain servers, data, backups, hardware maintenance, upgrades and hand holding/teaching.

It only takes a few minutes of actual labor to reinstall Windows if it's hosed. Take the machine into the shop and "ghost" the drive from a master and go do something else while that's working. Return the machine in a hour, it's that simple.

Another fact is that most people know and businesses use Windows and Office, schools teach it, the business world uses it. It's done, no possible penetration possible, even free OpenOffice hasn't made any real headway.

Another fact is OS X is tied to hardware, if your business needs matte screen laptops for the road warriors, Apple doesn't sell them except in a very few models. So choice of hardware is another problem, Toughbook with OS X? Dream on!

Apple doesn't give a rats ass, they want to sell flashy devices to home consumers and be absolutely no threat to Microsoft and the PC industry at all.

Forget all about OS X taking over the world, it's not going to happen. Apple is already introducing a new closed UI on consumer devices and that's going to be their market.

You want a real computer 10 years from now? It will be a Windows machine.


Sure a few companies can save money by going all Mac, but Apple is flaky and so is their hardware choices. Try getting video card upgrades for your Apple towers over the years and you'll see what I mean.

Also most Mac's are closed boxes, this makes it difficult to remove drive and service the device in house. The whole machine (and your companies private data) goes off to lala land to be fixed.

Since it's so easy to clone a Windows machine from a master, the benefits of going all Mac in business doesn't offset the drawbacks and limited hardware choices Apple provides.

Steve got that money from Gates to breath life into Apple and not to be a threat to his empire by going off into another direction. Apple Computer>Apple etc.

Sorry that's the truth and that comes from a 20 year Mac veteran.
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post #34 of 166
If Freescale does indeed convince manufacturers to produce $200 tablets, I predict it might very well be Newton vs. Palm all over again.

The Newton (handwriting recognition problems aside) was *far* better than the Palm. But at $700, it just couldn't compete with the $200 Palm units.

BTW, I still own a Newton Message Pad 2100 and love the device. I was willing to pay nearly $1,000 for it and considered it a bargain. Granted, Apple has added a lot of people like me to its stable over the past 15 years, but it will be interesting to see if Apple's "Cool Factor" can overcome a $500 price difference in the tablet space. A lot of it may have to do with how atrocious the new tablets are and how quickly the other manufacturers can match Apple (and the smart phone copies suggest that Apple may have an advantage here).


BTW, to whomever claimed that Apple's sales pale in comparison to the alternatives, this is true if you compare Apple against everyone else, but when you compare Apple against any other single company (which is the more fair comparison), they're not doing too bad.
post #35 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by sticknick View Post

Sadly I know one of these people. I was all I could do not to laugh in the poor dudes face when he said: "I bought this iPod, where is all the music?"

He freaked out when I told him he had to install iTunes on his PC, buy the music and then put it on the iPod.

I wish I were joking.

I'm curious... why would you lie to a friend?
He didn't have to buy anything (which you know), and all devices come with enabling software. (If iTunes is so evil, why did Palm essentially destroy their reputation as 'capable' by leeching off of it until recently?)
post #36 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlebrech View Post

the tMac..

The "T"mernator!

No?! How about "Macntouch" instead of Macintosh!

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post #37 of 166
Apples tablet will pwn all
post #38 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Wow, you sound like you're complaining that, in the process, Apple may have let down the consumer! Surely that's not what you mean?

Why not? Their first obligation is to the stockholders. And in that regard, they have been doing very well lately. "Very well" means high margins. High margins, all other things being equal, means charging more for the same product. Charging more for the same product is not a pro-consumer activity.

Do you imagine that they are different from any other mega-corporation in this regard? Their goal is NOT to selflessly aid consumer well-being. Their goal is to extract as much profit from the consumer as possible, given their available capital, and to and distribute that profit to shareholders. While the two are not orthogonal, one is a means while the other is the end.

For example, Apple "let down the consumer" when they discontinued Firewire. In the process, they increased profits via new sales of USB peripherals. They had a choice, and they made it. And given any future similar choices, they will always decide to maximize total profits.

Indeed, Apple is ruthless in this regard, calculating that they have a fixed audience of folks who will accept this sort of tactic, and buy their products regardless of excess price and the occasional ass-fucking. Their strategy has been brilliantly successful, making lots of folks rich due to even more folks supplying them with high-margin sales. Apple is not a not-for-profit organization like say, the ISO.
post #39 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Going out on a limb - It will not be called iSlate. In fact it won't be called "i" anything.

Well, I've said it before, but I'l say it again... I dunno whats wrong with the iBook name they already have. Seems the most sensible name to me.
post #40 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post

Like your optimism but here are the facts.

Businesses who need to hire IT personal usually to fix other things besides Windows.

Even a company filled with just Mac's needs IT personnel, to maintain servers, data, backups, hardware maintenance, upgrades and hand holding/teaching.

It only takes a few minutes of actual labor to reinstall Windows if it's hosed. Take the machine into the shop and "ghost" the drive from a master and go do something else while that's working. Return the machine in a hour, it's that simple.

Another fact is that most people know and businesses use Windows and Office, schools teach it, the business world uses it. It's done, no possible penetration possible, even free OpenOffice hasn't made any real headway.

Another fact is OS X is tied to hardware, if your business needs matte screen laptops for the road warriors, Apple doesn't sell them except in a very few models. So choice of hardware is another problem, Toughbook with OS X? Dream on!


Apple doesn't give a rats ass, they want to sell flashy devices to home consumers and be absolutely no threat to Microsoft and the PC industry at all.

Forget all about OS X taking over the world, it's not going to happen. Apple is already introducing a new closed UI on consumer devices and that's going to be their market.

You want a real computer 10 years from now? It will be a Windows machine.

Utter crap, as per usual...
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