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Apple iPad deal pushes another publisher to renegotiate with Amazon - Page 3

post #81 of 87
Amazon's near monopoly was great for consumers. It's as simple as that. Amazon was doing to e-books what Apple did for music with iTunes. Apple's entry into the e-books game allows the publishers to play Apple and Amazon against each other, with the end result of higher prices for the consumer. Why couldn't Apple have just worked with Amazon to improve the Kindle reader for the iPad?
post #82 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post

Amazon's near monopoly was great for consumers. It's as simple as that. Amazon was doing to e-books what Apple did for music with iTunes. Apple's entry into the e-books game allows the publishers to play Apple and Amazon against each other, with the end result of higher prices for the consumer. Why couldn't Apple have just worked with Amazon to improve the Kindle reader for the iPad?

I can tell you don't know anything about business.

Name a single great product that was designed by teams from different companies. It doesn't work. Amazon would insist on their clunky way of doing things and Apple would not be able to design it properly. AT BEST, you'd have a color Kindle, but you'd never have something with the integrated design elegance of the iPad.

As for Amazon's monopoly being great for consumers, that's absurd. Amazon was keeping prices artificially low to stave off competition. In the long run, it would have either stifled innovation or caused the market to be unprofitable, causing everyone to lose interest. Competition is what drives innovation.

I'm getting really tired of this 'higher prices for the consumer' crap. Macmillan's proposal was to LOWER some prices and raise others. As near as you can tell from their press release, only the latest best sellers would have the higher price and the higher volume of books would be cheaper. More importantly, under the new pricing, the publishers and authors get to keep the majority of the price rather than Amazon keeping 70%. When Amazon keeps twice as much as the publishers and authors, what's the incentive for them to create new work and make it available on that format?

Amazon's old pricing structure was good for Amazon - and no one else. I'm glad to see them put into their place.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #83 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post

I am not talking about you.

I am referring to the same bunch of complainers that repeatedly come here and every time attack virtually everything that is anywhere favourable towards Apple/Jobs/Mac.

First of all, Apple and the publishers discussions on pricing referred to newly released hardcover best sellers. Not later paper back or out of print editions.

I personally don't have any issue on how much the author/publisher decides to charge for a book; hard copy or e-edition. The market will determine if the value is just.

I also don't have a problem if either format is shared amongst the family or friends. But I do have issues with the idea that a copy(s) of the book can be created and loaned to anybody, in any format.

I don't believe that because one purchases a book, that one is entitled to make a copy period. I do however, believe that the owner should be able to sell or give away their original book/ebook.

I apologize, I misunderstood the intent behind your original post. I have been frustrated with e-Book prices since they first started selling, well, I don't know when they started, I bought my first one in 2000 (and lost the rights because the Reader technology tied it to a hardware ID).

It has been frustrating to wait for decent e-book prices and the technology to support them. The biggest issue I saw with Amazon was prices. I wasn't alone. Many people for a long time have boycotted the 9.99+ books and even dedicated sites to the cause. Thankfully, a very small minority of the us read the vast majority of books so if we are lucky, we can push the publishers that much faster...
post #84 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

I can tell you don't know anything about business.

Name a single great product that was designed by teams from different companies. It doesn't work. Amazon would insist on their clunky way of doing things and Apple would not be able to design it properly. AT BEST, you'd have a color Kindle, but you'd never have something with the integrated design elegance of the iPad.

Then you don't know what you're talking about either. Apple doesn't design everything that goes into their products either. Really not any different of a situation. And it's a bit like the iPhones Maps app that is written by Apple but powered mostly by Google.

Quote:
As for Amazon's monopoly being great for consumers, that's absurd. Amazon was keeping prices artificially low to stave off competition. In the long run, it would have either stifled innovation or caused the market to be unprofitable, causing everyone to lose interest. Competition is what drives innovation.

*cough* iPod *cough*

So the iPod's near-monopoly on mp3 players is stifling innovation? Thanks for clearing that up.

And keeping prices artificially low is exactly what Apple has reportedly tried to do with TV shows. I remember articles on this site saying that Apple was trying to negotiate for 99 cent shows. How many competitors do you think that would have driven out of the business, like say Amazon's Unbox/On Demand service?

Quote:
I'm getting really tired of this 'higher prices for the consumer' crap. Macmillan's proposal was to LOWER some prices and raise others. As near as you can tell from their press release, only the latest best sellers would have the higher price and the higher volume of books would be cheaper.

And didn't we hear that same line of reasoning about variable pricing for music tracks? Go to iTunes and find 10 songs selling for 69 cents that you'd actually want to own. Then find 10 tracks for 69 cents that you know 10 other people would like to own. Everything popular is sitting at either 99 cents or $1.29. That won't be any different for eBooks.

Quote:
More importantly, under the new pricing, the publishers and authors get to keep the majority of the price rather than Amazon keeping 70%. When Amazon keeps twice as much as the publishers and authors, what's the incentive for them to create new work and make it available on that format?

There's the fact publishers/authors were making additional money for pretty much no additional work. If the publishers weren't making money, do you think they would have agreed to that 70/30 split?

Likewise, Amazon as a major retailer might be knowledgeable about the price people are willing to pay for products. The 99 cent price for music tracks was said to be the "magic number" because it gave the illusion of it being less than $1.00. Just the same as $9.99 skirting right below the double-digit $10.00 price. They could well have solid data that just that 1 cent difference makes a huge difference in how much a product sells, let alone jumping from $9.99 to $13.99 or more.

And this case is even worse. It's going to be a fairly large percentage increase in price. How much do you think sales are going to drop when prices jump 40% or more? If they drop enough, Amazon might be forced out of the eBook business bringing us closer to an eBook monopoly that you've already said is a bad thing.

Or is a monopoly only a bad thing when it's not an Apple monopoly?
post #85 of 87
Revised Edit
post #86 of 87
Why are they charging more before it even takes off? Well, this is capitalism, let the public decide. If no one pays that much they will either be forced to lower their prices or the whole idea will crumble.
post #87 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

I can tell you don't know anything about business.

Name a single great product that was designed by teams from different companies. It doesn't work. Amazon would insist on their clunky way of doing things and Apple would not be able to design it properly. AT BEST, you'd have a color Kindle, but you'd never have something with the integrated design elegance of the iPad.

As for Amazon's monopoly being great for consumers, that's absurd. Amazon was keeping prices artificially low to stave off competition. In the long run, it would have either stifled innovation or caused the market to be unprofitable, causing everyone to lose interest. Competition is what drives innovation.

I'm getting really tired of this 'higher prices for the consumer' crap. Macmillan's proposal was to LOWER some prices and raise others. As near as you can tell from their press release, only the latest best sellers would have the higher price and the higher volume of books would be cheaper. More importantly, under the new pricing, the publishers and authors get to keep the majority of the price rather than Amazon keeping 70%. When Amazon keeps twice as much as the publishers and authors, what's the incentive for them to create new work and make it available on that format?

Amazon's old pricing structure was good for Amazon - and no one else. I'm glad to see them put into their place.

Exactly. Plus what Apple will be offering in e-reader mode (of course this is only a fraction of an iPad's ability too) will be far more than just a book if they follow the iTunes model. The LP mode applied to books could mean lots of back ground information and other data. Also with third party apps I can imagine a plethora of variations such as note taking for students, easy referencing and the ability to quote sections with auto attributing etc. This is a whole different animal from a dumb Kindle and will offer a far superior experience for users.
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Use duckduckgo.com with Safari, not Google Search
Been using Apples since 1978 and Macs since 1984
Long on AAPL so biased. Strong advocate for separation of technology and politics on AI.
Reply
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