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Apple's share of U.S. PC market cracks the 10% barrier

post #1 of 143
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Apple's share of the U.S. personal computer market grew more than 13% to reach a modern day high of 10.4% for the third quarter of 2010, leaving it just 17,000 units shy of becoming the nation's third largest PC vendor. [Updated with IDC data]

Gartner

Preliminary statistics released just minutes ago by market research firm Gartner have Apple selling what appears to be a quarterly record 1,831,664 Macs in the United States alone for the three-month period ending September. That's up sharply from the 1,611,000 units the company shipped domestically during the same period last year, which netted it a 9.3% share of the market.

Overall, Apple ranked fourth on the firm's list of top U.S. PC vendors, falling just 17,000 units shy of Acer, which saw shipments decline 21 percent to 1,848,511 units. Still, those sales were just enough to allow the maker of budget netbooks to cling to its third place ranking. Apple's iPad sales are not factored into Gartner's totals.

"Apple had another strong quarter," said Mikako Kitagawa, principal analyst at Gartner. "Increasing traffic to Apple, associated with the iPad release, as well as iMac and Mac Pro refreshes, contributed to the growth."

Preliminary U.S. PC Vendor Unit Shipment Estimates for 3Q10 (Thousands of Units) | Source: Gartner

Topping the list of US PC makers was HP, which saw sales rise 2% to nearly 4.5 million systems. HP is followed closely by Dell, whose sales slipped some 5.8 percent to 4.1 million units. Toshiba rounded out the top 5, boosting shipments by over 20% to 1.69 million units.

In the global market, HP remained in the top worldwide position but it experienced a slight decline in shipments in the quarter to 15.43 million units. Acer similarly saw slight declines in unit shipments but its 11.52 million shipments worldwide were enough to keep it ahead of third place Dell, which grew sales more than 9% to 10.81 million units.

Lenovo, Asus and Toshiba rounded out the top 6. Given that Apple is estimated to have shipped less than Toshiba's 4.695 million units worldwide, Gartner did not provide its standing in the list of top global PC vendors.

Preliminary Worldwide. PC Vendor Unit Shipment Estimates for 3Q10 (Thousands of Units) | Source: Gartner

Overall, Gartner said worldwide PC shipments surpassed 88.3 million units in the third quarter, a 7.6 percent increase from the third quarter of 2009. The results were below the firm's earlier market outlook, however, which had predicted third quarter PC shipments to grow 12.7 percent.

"The major growth inhibitor in the third quarter of 2010 was softness in consumer PC demand in the U.S. and Western Europe," said Kitagawa. "The third quarter historically is a strong consumer quarter, led by back-to-school sales. Consumer mobile PC demand, driven by low-priced notebooks, including mini-notebooks, slowed after very strong growth the past two years."

The analyst added that media tablet hype around devices such as the iPad also affected consumer notebook growth by delaying some PC purchases, especially in the U.S. consumer market.

"At this stage, hype around media tablets has led consumers and the channels to take a 'wait and see' approach to buying a new device," Kitagawa said.

In EMEA (Europe, the Middle East and Africa), PC shipments totaled 27.3 million units in the third quarter of 2010, an increase of 7.3 percent from the same period last year. Gartner said that the Western Europe PC market slowed as professional buyers and consumers held back on PC purchases, while emerging markets in Central and Eastern Europe -- as well as the Middle East and Africa -- experienced good growth.
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In Asia/Pacific, PC shipments totaled 29.7 million units, a 10.5 percent increase from the third quarter of 2009. In the emerging markets, mobile PC demand in the consumer segment continued to grow unabated as mainstream notebooks continue to appeal to first-time PC buyers as well as those substituting notebooks for desktops. Meanwhile, shipments in China held steady at 62 percent of all PCs shipped in Asia/Pacific, growing 11.3 percent over the same quarter last year.
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Latin American PC shipments totaled 8.2 million units, a 9.9 percent increase from the third quarter of 2009. Back-to-school PC sales in Latin America were reportedly sluggish, and this transpired into fewer home mobile PC shipments.
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Over in Japan, PC shipments surpassed 3.6 million units, a 14.1 percent increase from the same period last year. Large deals in the enterprise and government sectors drove PC sales in the quarter, according to Gartner. In the consumer market, replacement demand for primary PCs, both desktop and large-size mobile PCs, has continued to grow since the beginning of 2010.
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IDC

Meanwhile, rival market research firm IDC painted a slightly different picture of Apple's third quarter sales, estimating the company sold upwards of 2 million Macs domestically, boosting the company past Acer on growth of just over 24%.

Preliminary U.S. PC Vendor Unit Shipment Estimates for 3Q10 (Thousands of Units) | Source: IDC

"Apple's influence on the PC market continues to grow, particularly in the U.S., as the company's iPad has had some negative impact on the mininotebook market," said Bob O'Donnell, IDC vice president for Clients and Displays. "But, the halo effect of the device also helped propel Mac sales and moved the company into the number three position in the U.S. market."
post #2 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple\\'s share of the U.S. personal computer market grew more 13% to reach a modern day high

Why is 10% a \\"barrier\\"? Is it something that is difficult to pass through, like the sound barrier?

And that \\"modern day high\\" characterization - was the percentage higher in the pre-modern era? When was that?
post #3 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by appl View Post

Why is 10% a \\"barrier\\"? Is it something that is difficult to pass through, like the sound barrier?

And that \\"modern day high\\" characterization - was the percentage higher in the pre-modern era? When was that?

Barrier because it's a nice number and, oh, they've NEVER BEEN THERE BEFORE post-Steve.
post #4 of 143
These numbers don't include the iPad sales, so an honest look at these numbers would have it even higher. Anyone who uses an iPad would tell you it is more in line with a small laptop than a phone.
post #5 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Barrier because it\\'s a nice number and, oh, they\\'ve NEVER BEEN THERE BEFORE post-Steve.

But that is not what the word barrier mens. I\\'ve never been to Spain, but it is no barrier.

1
a : something material that blocks or is intended to block passage <highway barriers> <a barrier contraceptive>
b : a natural formation or structure that prevents or hinders movement or action <geographic barriers to species dissemination> <barrier beaches> <drugs that cross the placental barrier>
2
plural often capitalized : a medieval war game in which combatants fight on foot with a fence or railing between them
3
: something immaterial that impedes or separates : obstacle <behavioral barriers> <trade barriers>

Examples of BARRIER

Concrete barriers surround the race track to protect spectators.
The tree\\'s roots serve as a barrier against soil erosion.
The mountain range forms a natural barrier between the two countries.
Both leaders are in favor of removing trade barriers.
Cultural barriers have made it hard for women to enter many professions.
He argues that regulations should not be viewed as barriers to progress.
post #6 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevetim View Post

These numbers don't include the iPad sales, so an honest look at these numbers would have it even higher. Anyone who uses an iPad would tell you it is more in line with a small laptop than a phone.

Maybe that's because the Apple iPad is a computer peripheral NOT a stand-alone computing device.

Note: One must use an actual computer to even get the iPad up and running... Very Telling
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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post #7 of 143
Not surprising in the least. Just about everyone I know owns at least one Apple computer now (and many of them have become first-time buyers only in the past couple of years, driven by the halo effect of iPods, iPhones, and now iPads).

I've always thought that Apple's biggest sleeper growth opportunity is its computers. None of the analysts are seriously modeling this aspect of the company's growth prospects.
post #8 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Maybe that's because the Apple iPad is a computer peripheral NOT a stand-alone computing device.

Note: One must use an actual computer to even get the iPad up and running... Very Telling

Yeah, a peripheral, just like a pen drive or something.

/sarcasm
post #9 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevetim View Post

These numbers don't include the iPad sales, so an honest look at these numbers would have it even higher. Anyone who uses an iPad would tell you it is more in line with a small laptop than a phone.

Agreed!
post #10 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Maybe that's because the Apple iPad is a computer peripheral NOT a stand-alone computing device.

Note: One must use an actual computer to even get the iPad up and running... Very Telling

There is room for disagreement here. True you need to hook up to a computer at least the first time to set it up ... but after that it is more like a regular computer. I have created many keynote presentations on it. I use numbers for excel like calculations. I use pages for word processing while on the road. All songs, apps movies purchased on it stay on it. I sync it about once a month for backs-ups, but that is not required, it's just the smart thing to do.
post #11 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Not surprising in the least. Just about everyone I know owns at least one Apple computer now (and many of them have become first-time buyers only in the past couple of years, driven by the halo effect of iPods, iPhones, and now iPads).

I've always thought that Apple's biggest sleeper growth opportunity is its computers. None of the analysts are seriously modeling this aspect of the company's growth prospects.

Good point! I never really looked at it like that before...when I look at the latest line of iMacs, especially the 27" with slim-line wireless keyboard and the latest wireless mouse, it is just a work of art compared with the competition.

Same with their laptop line-just beautiful machines with a beautiful OS and iLife/iWork suites.

Best!
post #12 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Maybe that's because the Apple iPad is a computer peripheral NOT a stand-alone computing device.

Note: One must use an actual computer to even get the iPad up and running... Very Telling

Does this make my iPhone a computer peripheral and NOT a stand-alone phone?
post #13 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Postulant View Post

Does this make my iPhone a computer peripheral and NOT a stand-alone phone?

Your iPhone is both a computer peripheral AND a standalone phone. What would be great is if it would work as a standalone computer too.
post #14 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Maybe that's because the Apple iPad is a computer peripheral NOT a stand-alone computing device.

Nonsense
post #15 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevetim View Post

These numbers don't include the iPad sales, so an honest look at these numbers would have it even higher. Anyone who uses an iPad would tell you it is more in line with a small laptop than a phone.

Also, even if you ignore all iOS devices, the real number is closer to 25% when you exclude business situations like calling centres and office towers and just concentrate on consumers at home. Roughly one in four purchases of a personal computer for home use are Macs.
post #16 of 143
Looks to me like it was "Other" that was up over 20% not Toshiba. Toshiba was up a little more than Apple; 14.2% vs. 13.7%. Toshiba sold 1.63 million units not 1.69 million.
post #17 of 143
Whats the over / under on when John Dvorak has a stroke over this news?
post #18 of 143
This is very interesting news. Apple was around the 3% mark for the past ten years, and even dipping below 2% during some quarters. It's nice to see them gaining traction in the consumer market. I would say the main factors in their success are the iPhone's halo effect, the migration of users facing an entirely new operating system in Windows 7, and clever marketing. Oh, and of course great hardware and software.
post #19 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Maybe that's because the Apple iPad is a computer peripheral NOT a stand-alone computing device.

Note: One must use an actual computer to even get the iPad up and running... Very Telling

One must use *a* computer - desktop or laptop - to get it running.

By the way - disconnect your "actual" computer from all other computers for a month and let me know how that goes.

It's not as cut and dried as you want to believe.
post #20 of 143
That pesky rounding error just keeps getting bigger.
--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
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--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
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post #21 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Maybe that's because the Apple iPad is a computer peripheral NOT a stand-alone computing device.

Note: One must use an actual computer to even get the iPad up and running... Very Telling

You can request that Apple activate it in the Apple Store for you. Once activated, it doesn't need a computer.
post #22 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

I see what you are saying but I think almost all of us that use the iPad would agree that using it in conjunction with another computer is certainly they way to go. It really doesn't make for a very good standalone device at this point.

Again that is a matter of user preference and opinion. Word processing? complex excel calculations? PowerPoint design? Video editing? Sound editing? Image editing? This is a media creation machine as well as media playback machine? This is a computer ... and many of us who took this on the road instead of the laptop on a business trip got sold on this quickly.

It has never been necessary for me to connect my mac to my ipad. Like another poster said. Even apple can do that, so you don't really NEED the computer to make it work ... so it is hardly a perif. It acts more like a small laptop computer than any other device category. That is my point. An honest look at the numbers should include the iPad as a computer sale.
post #23 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booga View Post

You can request that Apple activate it in the Apple Store for you. Once activated, it doesn't need a computer.

I was going to reply to him directly, but you've already done that.

Apple got mine going in the store for me. Then, while still in the store, my iPad downloaded apps, and I was working with it.

Unfortunately, we do need a computer to upgrade the OS, and for backup. Otherwise, it isn't needed; even for printing.

But to say that it isn't a computer because it uses one for those two purposes is like saying that a PC isn't a computer because it needs the internet computer network for many tasks. Neither would be true.

But as usual, DaHarder is saying something he knows isn't true in order to annoy people. Either that, or he doesn't know what computers are, OR peripherals.
post #24 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

I see what you are saying but I think almost all of us that use the iPad would agree that using it in conjunction with another computer is certainly they way to go. It really doesn't make for a very good standalone device at this point.

It is not intended to be a standalone device. It makes trade-offs in product attributes (e.g., portable v. standalone) as all computers do, even laptops v. desktops.

For someone to call it a peripheral is a ridiculous statement, and I am sure you'd agree.
post #25 of 143
Those stats look suspiciously like netbooks are faltering under the crunch of a tool that is idealized for its HW. I wonder how the anti-iPad, netbook advocates are going to spin this. A recession, only rich people can afford to buy anything right now so they are buying Macs while everyone else cant even afford the more useful and better netbook?


Quote:
Originally Posted by stevetim View Post

These numbers don't include the iPad sales, so an honest look at these numbers would have it even higher. Anyone who uses an iPad would tell you it is more in line with a small laptop than a phone.

Its not using a relatively bloated desktop OS not designed for such slow HW, its using a mobile OS that was specifically created for such devices and a UI specifically redesigned to suit its needs. For those reason I dont feel it should be included with PC sales as currently defined.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #26 of 143
Apple was at 15% at some point when the Mac was first introduced. It dropped to 12% later. Then when Apple raised its price in the wake of rejecting MS's offer to license the Mac OS, it dropped a bit more.

It was Michael "You don't need to be a visionary to run Apple" Spindler who nearly brought the company down. That's an interesting story I lived through, and almost every article you read has gotten it wrong, because they were written a while after it happened, and misinterpret it, because they don't seem to remember what brought it on.
post #27 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by appl View Post

random words

What's wrong with your computer? Apostrophes don't come out correctly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

Nonsense

Can't use it without a computer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Booga View Post

You can request that Apple activate it in the Apple Store for you. Once activated, it doesn't need a computer.

You can't update the software without a computer. You have to buy all media on-device, as you can't sync without a computer. Software breaks? You can't restore it without a computer. Forget the lock password? Can't get in without a computer.
post #28 of 143
If Apple was making ⅓ of the industries consumer profits years ago, before the netbooks started selling in droves, I wonder what there profits are now. I can’t image any PC maker in the world wouldn’t trade places with Apple if they could.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #29 of 143
IMHO that's the computer tech I prefer to buy
post #30 of 143
If one considers "most" users are basically just doing email, music, photo management, reading e-books, or facebook, etc. I think the iPad could very well be a "stand-alone" device. I would very much like to simplify my digital life down to an iPhone 4 and an iPad 3Gs (MobileMe/the Cloud), NetFlix and tell my cable company to stick it up their nose once and for all!

We may still need a computer for now, as previous posters have said, backup, updates, work, etc., but very shortly we won't.

I can't wait. Who the hell wants to work on a computer all day? Ugggh!
post #31 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Those stats look suspiciously like netbooks are faltering under the crunch of a tool that is idealized for its HW. I wonder how the anti-iPad, netbook advocates are going to spin this. A recession, only rich people can afford to buy anything right now so they are buying Macs while everyone else cant even afford the more useful and better netbook?




Its not using a relatively bloated desktop OS not designed for such slow HW, its using a mobile OS that was specifically created for such devices and a UI specifically redesigned to suit its needs. For those reason I dont feel it should be included with PC sales as currently defined.

I would like to point out that the iPad wasn't marketed as a computer. It was purposely introduced as a category "between a smart phone and a laptop". Don't get me wrong, I love it, but I have to agree that the iPad shouldn't be considered an actual "computer". Although technically a calculator could be considered a computer....
post #32 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

What's wrong with your computer? Apostrophes don't come out correctly.

Can't use it without a computer.

You can't update the software without a computer. You have to buy all media on-device, as you can't sync without a computer. Software breaks? You can't restore it without a computer. Forget the lock password? Can't get in without a computer.

What you're saying is a distortion of the truth, though there is some correctness about some of it, while the rest is simply wrong

I don't even understand what you mean by " You have to buy all media on-device".

Nevertheless, it's irrelevant. It's still a computer.

Servers often require an outside computer to be connected in order to be updated, re-set, or have their software adjusted. Does that mean that they're not computers? That would be foolish to say.

The truth is that the iPad is a computer that's not 100% independent.
post #33 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aeolian View Post

I would like to point out that the iPad wasn't marketed as a computer. It was purposely introduced as a category "between a smart phone and a laptop". Don't get me wrong, I love it, but I have to agree that the iPad shouldn't be considered an actual "computer". Although technically a calculator could be considered a computer....

Anything that "computes" is a computer. A calculator is called that because it doesn't compute, it calculates. There's a big difference. Look it up.
post #34 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevetim View Post

These numbers don't include the iPad sales, so an honest look at these numbers would have it even higher. Anyone who uses an iPad would tell you it is more in line with a small laptop than a phone.

I never work on my iPad. I guess that's why. It's neither a Mac or a phone. Steve said it's a device between a smartphone and a laptop. I prefer to think of it as a device between a large desktop and a smartphone. So in that sense I see table computers replacing laptops in future markets. And then desktops becoming bigger and more powerful. Desktops are still where you get stuff done, for real.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #35 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Anything that "computes" is a computer. A calculator is called that because it doesn't compute, it calculates. There's a big difference. Look it up.

An iPod nano is a computer because it stores and processes data. Even the shuffle is a computer.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #36 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Maybe that's because the Apple iPad is a computer peripheral NOT a stand-alone computing device.

Note: One must use an actual computer to even get the iPad up and running... Very Telling

I've seen you over on Engadget. You clearly have no life.

You only "must" use a computer because that's the way Apple currently has it. They would pull that plug in the morning. It's definitely not for getting work done though.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #37 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I don't even understand what you mean by " You have to buy all media on-device".

If you don't have a computer with which to sync, you can't get any of your media on an iPad without buying it from the stores in the relevant applications. And no photos, either.
post #38 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

An iPod nano is a computer because it stores and processes data. Even the shuffle is a computer.

It uses a computer cpu, though a very simple one. Whether it's a computer is debatable. My microwave does similar things, but its not a computer. It's not really computing.
post #39 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

If you don't have a computer with which to sync, you can't get any of your media on an iPad without buying it from the stores in the relevant applications. And no photos, either.

I still don't know what you mean. I get my photo's in by using the photo adapter kit, either directly from my D-SLR, or a card. I can get photo's directly from the internet, or movies, or books, or magazines, or newspapers. I can also do this from my Mac Pro. You obviously have not used an iPad.
post #40 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Those stats look suspiciously like netbooks are faltering under the crunch of a tool that is idealized for its HW. I wonder how the anti-iPad, netbook advocates are going to spin this. A recession, only rich people can afford to buy anything right now so they are buying Macs while everyone else cant even afford the more useful and better netbook?




Its not using a relatively bloated desktop OS not designed for such slow HW, its using a mobile OS that was specifically created for such devices and a UI specifically redesigned to suit its needs. For those reason I dont feel it should be included with PC sales as currently defined.

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Anything that "computes" is a computer. A calculator is called that because it doesn't compute, it calculates. There's a big difference. Look it up.

Perhaps you should look it up....

com·put·er   
[kuhm-pyoo-ter]
noun
1.
Also called processor. an electronic device designed to accept data, perform prescribed mathematical and logical operations at high speed, and display the results of these operations.
2.
a person who computes; computist.

Maybe my calculator can't do this....
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