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diet and exercise!

post #1 of 41
Thread Starter 
I'll be the first to admit it... I'm overweight. I don't like it, either.

So these days I'm trying to do something about it, but there's a huge amount of room for improvement so I thought I'd start an open topic for all things involving diet, exercise, weight loss, weight gain, fitness, health in general.. etc.

Now, I'm not obese or anything, but I'm definitely not thin, I'm not that muscular, I'm not really superstrong or anything, and I just don't have a very attractive body. But, I am working to change thatcutting really bad things out of my diet, eating more foods and vegetables, reminding myself not to go overboard on things (as much as possible), I do a lot of walking and exercise.. and most importantly I've set goals for myself. Whether or not they're really attainable is up to me, though I have faith in myself.

The hard part right now is backing my efforts. I don't have a car so I can't get to/from a gym or health club, or go to the grcoery store to buy healthy foods when I need them, and I'm far too far away to walk anywhere. I don't have a decent bike, either, and even then I feel weird biking around, probably the same weird I'm afraid I'd feel at a gym or health club. But since I can't get healthy food when I want/need it, I find myself eating things I shouldn't. Anyway, I'm saving up for all sorts of stuff, and some exercise equipment is part of it. I'm thinking I'll get an elliptical sometime (I'm sure I'll have to spend $200-400 just to get a decent one.. but it's an investment, and that's like one of my biweekly paychecks after tax), for aerobic exercise, a set of free weights (not real sure on prices or what I'll get yet) for anaerobic exercise, or maybe just one of those exercise machines, I'm surprised at how inexpensive they are. At one point I wanted a treadmill but after looking at the going prices for decent ones, the desire quickly faded away. And I'm not gimmicky enough to consider spending my hard-earned money on stuff like those Total Gym things, or even a Bowflex.. besides, for anaerobic exercise I've heard that free weights are the best. They are far more cost-effective, that much I know. But I digress, I'm more interested in losing mass before gaining it.

Anyway, I have trouble counting calories, and I've tried some odd diets with healthy but bad-tasting (or tasteless) foods, and I have a problem with that. I ordered a couple of books about weight loss and nutrition, I forget their names, but I had heard about them a few different places. And I am still looking for any good, livable, and healthy dietary ideas. Also, I would love to hear any inspirational stories or hints or tips or recommendations for exercise equipment or what methods I should use or if anyone else is on a similar journey to bettering their health. I really just know almost nothing about fitness/health, to be frank. I just know I want to do something! I don't want to become a champion bodybuilder overnight (not that I wouldn't mind.. ), I just want to slim down and develop a pleasant body tone, first.

So, just tell me anything.

For instance, I just learned today that it's a better idea to do cardio in the morning, to get your metabolism up, and then weight-training later in the day once you've recovered your energy some, if you're doing both in one day. That makes a lot of sense.
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post #2 of 41
Thread Starter 
Oh yeah. And I have a lot of questions about health clubs, memberships, gyms, that kind of thing.

How many folks here go? Where should I go? What should I pay, do they offer student discounts you think? What are the hints and tips for all of that? When should I go? Should I get a personal trainer? Do they do mandatory physicals or anything embarrassing like that, when you sign up? What do you wear? Do most people take showers there? Should I go with a friend? What should I look out for? Any horror stories?
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post #3 of 41
i've found the only way i'll ever really excercise is if it's a competitve sport. i sign up for a bunch of different sports with friends depending on the time of year.

it's fun enough it doesn't feel like excercise, and you go 'cause it's with friends.
post #4 of 41
Sport is the way to go,I like to surf,it's easy to get motivated,when there are no waves,I go running and lift weights,very hard to get motivated.
As far as diet is concerned,you have to have a lot of healthy food around at all times,it's hard because most Americans have terrible diets,and it's thought to be uncool to eat healthy food.If you eat healthy food most of the time you will be OK.

[ 07-23-2002: Message edited by: Rick1138 ]</p>
post #5 of 41
Thread Starter 
[quote]Originally posted by alcimedes:
<strong>i've found the only way i'll ever really excercise is if it's a competitve sport. i sign up for a bunch of different sports with friends depending on the time of year.

it's fun enough it doesn't feel like excercise, and you go 'cause it's with friends.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Well, it's hard to do that when you don't have many sporty/jock friends, and especially hard when you aren't a big sports fiend or a jock yourself... I'm not in high school any more, either, so it's not that easy to get into competitive sports.

I'm really determined to improve myself though, I just need some advice and tips and answers, from some knowledgeable people, so I can be on my way with this.
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post #6 of 41
You've got to look around,I was never much of an athlete when I was in high school,but I've become half way decent in my old age.I can surf circles around most of the lifeguards here,even though many of them are better swimmers than I am,they just aren't crazy enough.Another thing to consider is taking dance lessons,although apparently from info in another thread most of the posters here feel that dance is effeminate,but I guarentee that there will be girls there-hot ones too,and dancers are incredible in bed.
post #7 of 41
You know what when I was at school I hated sport I couldnt stand anything to do with fitness, I wasnt too fat but I was overweight. In my second last year of school (1 yr ago) I took up running and am now taking it quite seriously.. I lost so much weight and now feel much better for doing it. When I started running I found it so hard to keep it up but as I progressed and saw improvement and saw that as my encouragement to run!
I looked at joining a gym but wasnt really interested as it was costly and I wasnt to sure if I would get sick of it (Or should I say get lazy) and stop going! Frankly I would avoid a gym for a little while.

Here are my tips (I am no expert but I think these little tips help!)

The best workout is just getting up in the morning and going for a GOOD walk! Worry about weights and tyhings when you have lost weight! it is really important to go in the morning before you have eaten as you will burn Fat Calories., the one thing we need to burn! Diet is important I cut down on Junk food and stoped eating lots of chocolate and take away..Eaten a good breakfast(after your walk) and a healthy luch folowed by a dinner is good! Try to make your dinner lower in carbo style food (Like potato and bread etc)

I now train 6 days a week with my Coach along with other brilliant runners (not that I am...yet!) and am hoping to run at the National soon!

Hope that lil bit of info has helped

[ 07-23-2002: Message edited by: trevorM ]</p>
trevorM

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trevorM

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post #8 of 41
Hm, I was quite out of shape for several years until a friend gave me motivation to get into shape... it sure helped, and I am somewhat thin and somewhat muscular... Before I was 5'8" and 150pds, now I am 5'8" and 140pds - lost fat, gained muscle.

My suggestions to you - don't walk, jog, you'll burn more calories that way and your heart will get better due to the stress. As for dieting, I never really dieted, I just ate as I always did, it was more of an excersize thing for me. But it is a good idea to stay off the junk food, after a while you get used to not eating junk food and you get used to excersizing so it does not become annoying.

Don't get those home gyms, there is a high chance you will use it for the first week and never again... though a treadmill can be nifty (I use mine occasionally). I found out that, for me, gaining muscle reduced my fat content, so do try and work out somehwere... I started by buying a few dumbells from the sports store and doing simple upper body excersizes with them. Within a month or two, I was way more in shape than I was (with some occasional jogging).

This summer I am going to a gym every day and work out for 2-3 hours a day, and I feel great about it. It also helps a LOT if you have a buddy with you - offers some motivation and competition.

And really, really try and push yourself to the limit - you will not get stronger or better (quickly anyway) if you do not jog to the last sweat, or lift weights until you cannot lift your arms/legs anymore.

And if you do want some home equipment, stay away from those lame ones that do not have any weights, they get boring fast (I would get a bowflex actually, or something with weights).

Anyways, whatever you do, good luck!
post #9 of 41
I am lucky in that I am one of those people with a rapid metabolism who can eat lots and stay slim but I choose not to overeat. I steer well clear of junkfoods, packaged, ultra-processed and chemicalized foods with artifical additives, colors and garbage....as in all those things the human body was not designed to deal with.

I love exercise! That includes hiking, biking, rollerblading, swimming and dancing, and I also run at least 40 miles a week, preferably up the mountain trails or on the beach.
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post #10 of 41
As a competitive cyclist and a Marine officer, physical fitness is a pretty key part of my life. The type of training I do is probably overkill for you, but I can go over some good basics...

First and foremost, the single most important thing you can do is to start drinking more water. It's cheap, and quite readily available. Water makes up about 60% of your body, and it is also the primary constituent of blood... therefore, proper hydration assists your body in transporting oxygen, nutrients, and hormones to the cells that need them. It's also pretty essential for digestion, absorption and utilization of nutrients. In other words, you can spend over a hundred dollars a month on supplements, but they won't do you any good if you're not staying properly hydrated. Your body's temperature is also affected by how much water you drink. The more you drink, the cooler you stay, and that's important during the summer especially.

Some fun facts: For every 2.2 pounds of body weight you lose due to fluid loss, your body temperature will increase by about .3 degrees Celsius. In other words, losing about 2-3% of your body weight to fluid loss decreases your performance by roughly 10%, and losing more can result in heat stroke. So drink often.. try and intake 2-3 litres per day.

eating healthy is a given, and you shouldn't have to be told what constitutes a healthy meal. It doesn't mean you have to eat that way ever waking minute for the rest of your life, but you need to discipline yourself. I usually have one or two meals a week that I call "cheating meals", where I eat what I want. The rest of the week, I'm on a proper diet. And it isn't that bad, in fact, I really prefer not to deviate from it too much. Again, you know what you have to do here.

In terms of exercise... if you're looking to drop weight quick, try getting up and doing an aerobic activity in the morning before you eat anything. This will help burn away that fat. I'd suggest running or riding you bike for about a half an hour. If you're running, and you're not used to it, try taking shorter strides - that will put less stress on your muscles that aren't used to this kind of workout. You can also get on your bike for 30 minutes as well, but make sure you spend most of that time actually pedalling, it doesn't count if you're just coasting.

For anaerobic activity, weight lifting is probably the most common. Remember, in the weight room, it isn't about how much you're lifting, it is all about form. Nobody there is in competition with other people, and nobody is going to look down at you if you can only benchpress the bar with no weights. Most people at gyms are pretty helpful, and I've never encountered anyone in a gym that wasn't helpful and nice. Just like anything, it's kind of weird to go there for the first time. I suggest you try and find someone that can show you proper form for the exercises you want to do, because without proper form, the exercises aren't doing you any good, and you risk injury as well.

For just starting out in the gym, I'd recommend following a routine that goes like this for your first 6 - 8 weeks...

Go Monday/Wednesday/Friday, and don't forget to stretch first Start by doing a chest press with free weights. shoot for 2 - 3 sets, aiming for 12 - 20 reps per set. Then do the same with a shoulder press with free weights. Then you might want to try some pull downs, and work your triceps as well. Maybe some curls or something. move down to your lower body... with a leg press, leg curls, etceteras. Just some suggestions, but really, you should talk to someone about your goals and work out a schedule for *you*.

Finally, I cannot recommend some form of cross training enough. And by cross training, for me at least, that means an activity that doesn't involve the bicycle. My cross training usually starts in the winter... swimming usually. But for you, you may wish to consider doing a sport you find fun just to keep you motivated and focused. Try a self defense class... nothing says fun like a good hour and a half of Aikido ;-)

But really, it's all about specifically what your goals are. Being a competitive cyclist, I want to be able to rider harder, longer, and faster. My entire training schedule is built around this. In the Marines, it's, admittedly, about trying to get a perfect on your PFT... but also, just in general, it's about keeping exceptional physical fitness levels. So think about what exactly it is that you want, post them here and we can talk more, or find someone at a gym (I go to the Y personally) that can help you. It's all about motivation and dedication. So do you just want to drop the extra weight, or do you want to take it farther than that? Be specific now
post #11 of 41
Thread Starter 
Wow!! :eek: You guys are so smart! I can't believe I didn't know all of this already (I'm almost embarrassed to say)..

Thank you all for your replies and good information. I think I should read through all of it a few more times and then I'll pepper you with some more questions. Fellowship, trevor, chych, Jack... all REALLY great info. I must absorb it.

I was afraid that I would just embarrass myself by asking these questions here, not really knowing if anyone was "into" this kind of thing enough to.. know. I was wrong, though, and for once that's a good thing.

Just wow.. thank you for all of this advice and guidance, it's especially motivating knowing that there are people out there like all of you. I never thought AI was this cool! I just wish I knew more people like you guys in real life, so you could really show me all of this stuff I don't know. But for the meantime, I think the approach I am going to take is (a) finishing the "clean up" of my dietary habits that I started, and (b) running/jogging, in the morning (burning fat calories rather than food calories I've just eaten makes a lot of sense). Then after my body has adjusted to that I think I'll join a local 24 hour fitness, that place looks good to me.. it'll probably take at least that long to find somebody who will go with me, because I'm too shy to go alone.
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post #12 of 41
Some quickies: ADD things to your life. It's very hard for people to NOT do something. That's why diets that tell you to not eat certain things usually don't work.

Exercise more, eat more fruits, veggies, whole grains, beans, etc. If you have plenty of good, low-calorie stuff to eat, you'll be less likely to eat bad stuff. But don't tell yourself "I've got to stop eating X and Y." It just usually doesn't work.

And don't think of it as temporary. Only do things that you're ready to do for the rest of your life. I'm guessing you're not ready to eat only grapefruits for the rest of your life. :eek:
[quote]Originally posted by M3D Jack:
<strong>Go Monday/Wednesday/Friday, and don't forget to stretch first </strong><hr></blockquote>Hey now, warm up first, don't stretch! Stretch after.
post #13 of 41
Congratulations on taking the first step! My story is a bit more for motivation than for advice, as M3D JACK beat me to the cyclist's training regime.

I was always a bit soft, but my second year of law school, I went from 5'10" 175 to 225lbs. I got tired walking up the stairs to the law review office. My school had an NCAA club cycling team and I joined (I raced as a junior when I was in HS). By putting my head down and "just do(ing) it" I immediately lost loads of weight. You can't believe how quickly the stuff comes off you when you are trying to climb up to the Blue Ridge Parkway at 225lbs! The competition and friendship of my team mates became addictive. For this reason, I recommend sport rather than a gym. I've tried the gym several times, and the only time I ever got results was with a friend. Even then, the results weren't as good because I didn't have a goal like a race to train for. Anyway, at the end of the season I was down to 170lbs and had won the season championships in my category (more like a perfect attendance prize in my case). Since then (2years total), I've gotten down to 157 (10 more to go) and have gotten several top 10 and a few top 5's in USCF races. You'll find that after exercising for a period of time, say 3 months, you'll feel terrible if you don't exercise. It's like an addiction. Also, you have a lot more leeway with your diet when you are burning so many extra calories.

My advice, swallow hard and ignore the embarrassment of just starting. You'll show them later. Also, don't worry right away about wholesale changes in your diet. These are important, but in the short run its more important to get moving for a couple of reasons. First, overweight people who exercise are less likely to have health problems than those who don't, regardless of diet (I have read this, but I am not a doctor). Second, you need a foundation upon which to built the rest of your habits. Once you've established the strong habit of training, then its time to add other good habits. Its very very important to have a solid foundation of exercise before you change your diet, otherwise you'll quit b/c it will just be too hard to keep them all up at once. Trust me on this one.
I did this on the James diet - told to me by a friend of my named James - "Eat less, move more."
Slowly, but surely, you'll build a new lifestyle that you'll be able to keep up, and actually want to follow.
If you're in college, see if your school has a cycling team. The members will probably adopt you and help you out, as mine did for me. Or, find a club in your area that has lots of levels of riders. There should be someone who will help you out. Otherwise, just start going to the gym and meet some regulars. That'll help make you stick.

Thoth

PS: Weight lifting is aerobic, usually, not anaerobic, just at a lower intensity that the other aerobic exercises you've mentioned. Sitting around at your computer you are respirating aerobically. A very high heart rate (where your body's ability to deliver o2 to working muscles is outpaced by your work volume) produces anaerobic metabolism and you probably won't get this just by lifting weights.
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post #14 of 41
[quote]Originally posted by BRussell:
<strong>
Hey now, warm up first, don't stretch! Stretch after. </strong><hr></blockquote>

It's good to stretch before and after you lift weights, as well as some sort of aerobic activity to warm up. Think about it, do you want to be lifting with tight muscles? Stretching reduces the risk of injury, so stretch before and after you lift.

Also, you may want to incorproate an ab circuit into your workout. Situps or crunches work well. Personally, when I get up in the mornings I do about 50 jumping jacks to get the blood going, then I do three sets of pushups, situps, and pullups.

Finally, a note on overtraining and recovery You don't want to hit the gym every day... or rather, you don't want to work the same muscle groups every day. for instance, if I go in today and spend two hours on my upper body, I don't want to be repeating that the following day. Your muscles need some time to recover and rebuild themselves. When you list, you're tearing muscle tissue... and when the muscles repair those tears, the muscle essentially builds itself up stronger. This is precisely why you get stronger over time, because the muscle repairs itself in an effort to prevent that damage in the future. But you don't want to overtrain, as that results in injury, and long term recovery. Take it easy initially. And after you workout or exercise, start drinking immediately to replace the fluids that you have lost.

Keep in mind this quote: "Remember that rest is a key part of any training program and may be the toughest training choice you'll have to make."

good luck, and I'm sure everyone in this thread would be more than happy to continue advising you or answering questions
post #15 of 41
Can some of you fat people hook me up with a few pounds? Forget losin weight, I can't gain it!
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post #16 of 41
Nifty thread. I too am a big guy, weight-wise (~115 kilos, although I am close enough to two meters as for the difference not to matter so I guess that's a little bit of an excuse). I tried jogging every morning for a few days last year, but I didn't stick with it. Maybe I'll start again tomorrow. Definitely need to trim down though.
I am a firm believer that any fitness equipment is wasted money. If you have a bike and a road and the inclination, that's all you need. Neh? My problem is inclination.
post #17 of 41
Leave Nebraska this second and go hike the Continental Divide Trail.
post #18 of 41
[quote]Originally posted by alcimedes:
<strong>i've found the only way i'll ever really excercise is if it's a competitve sport. i sign up for a bunch of different sports with friends depending on the time of year.

it's fun enough it doesn't feel like excercise, and you go 'cause it's with friends.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Definitely my preference as well. Problem is, we're a very disorganized bunch so we don't play on a regular basis. We do go to the pub on a regular basis so it does fuk all good.

Overweight yes. Sadly I'm also indisciplined so I doubt it will ever change
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the Irish passion for freedom. If our deed has not
been sufficient to win freedom, then our children
will win it by a better deed.
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post #19 of 41
My advice:
Do an activity you enjoy, that way you're more likely to stick at it.
When using weights, the correct technique is more important than the weight itself. If you find yourself compromising the technique, reduce the weight.
You build muscle after working out, not at the gym itself. Lifting weights only provides the stimuli, by overloading the muscles. Therefore don't work the same muscle groups two days in a row. Immediately after a workout, you're actually weaker than before you started.
Vary your routine. This prevents boredom. When lifting weights, it also prevents your body getting use to things, which would reduce the effectiveness of the exercise.
With more muscle, you'll naturally burn more calories, as its the calories that fuel the muscles.
Exercise is only 50% of the equation, the other 50% is a well balanced diet.
Its been said before, getting fit is 90% determination and 10% perspiration.
Most people have the physical ability to get fitter, its whether they have the mental strength to see it through that really counts.
Finally, don't compare yourself to other people, especially people who have been doing it for years. Everyone is different. Everyone has a different potential. The best you can do is to realise yours.
I hope this advice in some way helps!

[ 07-24-2002: Message edited by: RodUK ]</p>
post #20 of 41
Buy a bicycle and go everywhere on it. Buy a really nice one and nurture it: this should stop you "feeling weird" about biking everywhere. Make 'em jealous of your good taste.

Distances shrink; it's amazing. I commute on mine.
You will also be doing your bit for the welfare of the planet. Buy a bicycle and like me you will be lean and smug.

[ 07-24-2002: Message edited by: Hassan i-Sabbah ]</p>
post #21 of 41
I hardly exercise, pig out on 26 ounce porterhouse steaks (with the strips of gummy white fat...I actually suck on those...,) junk foods, candy, you name it. I'm 135 pounds. I love my metabolism during the day, but it also takes me 2 hours just to clock my body down and fall asleep.

I wish I was fat(ter.)
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post #22 of 41
[quote]Originally posted by Eugene:
<strong>I wish I was fat(ter.) </strong><hr></blockquote>

Give it a few years.
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post #23 of 41
Thread Starter 
So, a bike? I guess the consensus is that riding a bicycle is a good way to exercise, and it's obviously a mode of transport.. plus, cheaper than a car. I always liked taking walks in the park (I used to walk our dogs a lot), and there are tons of bike trails, so I could get into that I guess.

Well, there is one problem though. This is kind of embarrassing, but I am not really sure if I know how to ride a bike. <img src="graemlins/embarrassed.gif" border="0" alt="[Embarrassed]" />

I grew up rurally, and I always had a bike during my childhood... but I just never used it much. I was busy riding horses and riding lawnmowers and doing other livestock-related things, and beyond lack of interest in biking, it was always difficult for me to ride a bicycle on a gravel/dirt road... there just wasn't pavement out there in a rural area outside of Plattsmouth, Nebraska (pop. ~6,500 at the time). And I don't know if weight could have had anything to do with it, but I was somewhat overweight as a child, too, so I was pretty lacking in athletic confidence and it just seemed really too hard to ride it. So it just sat in the garage.

Then a few years back we moved to Omaha, and we're still here. I guess I don't have any more excuses not to get a bike and just try it, except that I don't really remember how to ride and I would be so embarrassed to have to relearn it as a teenager (please, no training wheels jokes ). Any suggestions?

Beyond that, I just have to get a bike.. and considering the price of the exercise equipments I was saving up for, I'm sure I have enough money to buy a really decent bike and stuff. So give me suggestions, I don't know anything about bikes either. Aesthetics, price, and safety are important to me... durability and features are always an added plus, and obviously comfort is as well, if there are any varying degrees of that... I told you I didn't know anything! Also, where should I shop for a bike? Don't you have to get a bike license or some weird thing like that? Oh, and a helmet! (I'm smrt.) I need a stylish helmet of course.. But I better not get ahead of myself.

I did some jumping jacks and crunches this morning. I had been trying to do like 50 or something every morning a few weeks ago.. that lasted like, 4 days, then I was in a rush because I overslept and I forgot that I was trying to do that. I'm going to have to get up earlier in the morning! :eek:
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post #24 of 41
well, cycling is certainly a great sport and doubles as an effective mode of transport. Some people hate bikes though, and if you're not a very well disciplined person, you should make sure you're doing something that you find fun so as not to lose interest. So if you think riding a bike will be fun for you, go for it. It's easily one of the most challenging sports in the world

As for getting a bike... it's going to sound snobbish, but I'm not in the least bit familiar with consumer offerings these days. Go to a real bike shop... Trek, Specialized, etceteras are a good sign of a shop offering decent brands. They should have acceptable consumer offerings. Analyze the type of riding that you will be doing... I mean, it sounds to me like you don't need to be looking at a bike that has a front suspension fork, but you don't need to be looking at a road bike with drop bars either. Plan to spend $300 or so (I'm guessing, it's been a while since I worked at a shop) to get a decent bike.

Getting up in the morning is only difficult if you stay up late ;-) Go to bed by 10pm, get up at 6am You'll eventually just get in the habit of doing that. Find out how many situps you can currently do, set a goal, and work towards it. Same thing with pushups and pullups. They all come quickly. If you'd like to hear the USMC PFT, it consists of the following:

3 mile run in 18 minutes
20 pullups without dropping
200 situps in 2 minutes

Each event is worth 100 points total, officers must score 225 or higher. It's fun stuff

Motivation and confidence are the keys to success
post #25 of 41
I am coming into this one a bit late, but here's my two cents.

I don't recommend running. It severly stresses the joints and connective tissues. Fast walking (4 mph) should do you fine. Biking is great, swimming is too. I also recommend Pilates or Yoga (you can get a video of these, or far better, take a class.), Yoga is, for me, one of the hardest workouts that I do. I take a Power Yoga class two times a week, and it has made a huge difference.

I do recommend a gym. I have found that if I have paid for it, I am likely to use it. Even though you might feel really self-concious going at first, I think it's worth it. I go to Crunch, a very trendy Hoolywood-y place here in LA. It's filled with 25 year olds with 5% body fat and 25% silicone, but I go. In old shorts and a t-shirt.

As for diet, unfortunately, common sense is really the only way to go. Look at the packages of everything you buy. If it has anything you can't pronounce, pass it up. If it has anything ending with an -ose (dextrose, fructose, etc.) put it back on the shelf. Stay out of any aisle that has pre-made or processed foods. I also suggest giving up caffeine and alcohol while you are on the diet. Go to the health food store once every two weeks even if you have to take a cab. If you buy a juice, make sure that it's juice, and not "juice drink". Drop bread entirely. Have pasta or rice infrequently. Before you grab that piece of chocolate or whatever, ask yourself, "Is this worth being fat over?" most times the answer is no. (of course, once in a great while you have to treat yourself to something. If you like chocolate, let yourself have a few ounces of of something wildly delicious once every two or three weeks, like some Valhrona, and really savor it.)

Diets are boring, no doubt about it. That's why people start popping pills and doing the "48 hour Hollywood Diet" crap. The b1tch part is that you basically have to just change the way that you eat and move to lose weight and keep it off. It's like getting religion or joining AA. And like AA, don't beat yourself up if you sleep late and miss a day, or get a cheeseburger at McD's. Everybody slips. The key is to get right back on the diet, right then. Don't say, I'll start tomorrow, or after that dinner party on Friday, or that trip to the club with my friends, or national sofa-care month, or whatever.

It's going to take work and time, but it took time to get you where you are now. And believe me: if I, whose dedication to doing nothing is formidable can do it, you can.
<a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0071383832/qid=1027543181/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_1/102-7172790-2254501" target="_blank">This book was helpful in jump-starting my system</a>

[ 07-24-2002: Message edited by: tmp ]</p>
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post #26 of 41
[quote]Originally posted by M3D Jack:
<strong>If you'd like to hear the USMC PFT, it consists of the following:

3 mile run in 18 minutes
20 pullups without dropping
200 situps in 2 minutes

Each event is worth 100 points total, officers must score 225 or higher. It's fun stuff </strong><hr></blockquote>

Whoa... I could do that (except maybe for the run, I'll have to clock myself tomorrow.) That's encouraging; I have a real self-image problem.

bradbower, I'd certainly suggest that you start jogging before you invest in any equipment. I find that a good run every morning is enough for me and twice-weekly trips to the Y take care of the weight lifting.
post #27 of 41
Hm...

The bike sounds a good thing! i used it for years cos i dint have money to buy the monthly bus ticket... it's the fastest way to move in the city i suggest an OLD one if u need it in the city... otherwise suppose it's gonna be stolen sooner or later...

Then find something you like as sport. i love swimming... or often walk.

I guess i have the opposite problem .. i'm 5'10" tall and i guess soemthing like 105 to 110 lb (but don't want to be any heavier either). Some things i guess could work: become a vegetarian ora at least use a lot of green and vegetables... fish is good. i prefer no-fat and low-fat.

Don't eat when you are not hungry. And when yuo are not hungry anymore, quit eating. Eat slowly. Drink lots of water.

Ehehe.. i rad somewhere you need 1 000 000 clicks to burn the calories of a marc chocolate bar...
I dun't know how many it would be with touch pad? 1 500 000 ? <img src="graemlins/lol.gif" border="0" alt="[Laughing]" />
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post #28 of 41
[quote]Originally posted by Mulattabianca:
<strong>I guess i have the opposite problem .. i'm 5'10" tall and i guess soemthing like 105 to 110 lb (but don't want to be any heavier either). </strong><hr></blockquote>

You and Alley McBeal should get together then

You should go weigh yourself, I used to date a girl that was 5'1" tall, weighed about 100lbs, and she was rather skinny. I'm about 5'10" tall and my target weight zone is between 145 and 155 lbs

I wouldn't cut meats out of your diet, they are your best source of protein. Definitely add more veggies though. Keep in mind that your body uses carbohydrates as energy, however, if the carbs that you intake go unused, they turn into fat. This is why eating high carb foods like rice, breads, and pasta aren't good to eat if you're not going to be burning them off.

There is actually a diet out there by a Dr. Atkins where you don't intake more than 20 - 30 grams of carbs per day, and you end up dropping, on average, 10 lbs a week. It's actually starting to gain some credibility with doctors and nutritionists, and if you want to drop weight quickly, I'd suggest doing it, and following it up with proper nutrition and exercise. Just read the labels on your foods... adding up the carbs in things shouldn't be too hard.
post #29 of 41
Mh i guess the most basic rule is FAT is FAT... so if you think every gram of fat you eat (bigmac has 36 g of fat!!!! plus potatoes) will be in your waist or a$$ .. you are gonna eat less fat!!

check somewhere a fat content table.. try it.
but don't eliminate the fats completely..
lets say at least 20g a day (as a man) but ALL of them.. so the ones that are already in the food you eat..


i guess those low carb diets can be quite dangerous. i've been a veggie for ages (so not considering to skip back to meats) and don't like the taste of fat... if I would try the low carb having no fat and no meat i guess i'd be quite dead.. and brain dead! the brain needs sugar..

<img src="graemlins/hmmm.gif" border="0" alt="[Hmmm]" />

how many clicks on a toucpad i need to burn a chocolate bar?? with a mouse it should be 1000 000 but i don't know if that's in windows or in mac <img src="graemlins/lol.gif" border="0" alt="[Laughing]" />

buy an OLD keyboard where you have to hit the keys!! you'll burn mmore calories writing..!! haha <img src="graemlins/lol.gif" border="0" alt="[Laughing]" />
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post #30 of 41
Thread Starter 
[quote]Originally posted by M3D Jack:
<strong>Find out how many situps you can currently do, set a goal, and work towards it. Same thing with pushups and pullups. They all come quickly. If you'd like to hear the USMC PFT, it consists of the following:

3 mile run in 18 minutes
20 pullups without dropping
200 situps in 2 minutes

Each event is worth 100 points total, officers must score 225 or higher. It's fun stuff

Motivation and confidence are the keys to success </strong><hr></blockquote>

In both of my years as an ROTC cadet we had to do this "Presidential Fitness" competition whatever thing, which most students lovingly referred to as a stupidass waste of time and energy (myself included), but we were forced to embarrass ourselves in front of all of our classmates watching us for a grade as we were compared to supposed national standards for exercise-type things. Just like your little test. It was pretty close to that, too, but then again it doesn't matter how close it was, it seemed unreasonably and unachievably high as far as standards go. It was ruined by the strict enforcement of rules and meticulousness of the instructors, who were of course actually in the military (the army, not the marine corps). Of course upon learning that we had to do it in front of all of our classmates I wasn't exactly thrilled, either... Needless to say I skipped that period. I feel sorry for people whose job requires it, too. But then, I guess you like it... and who wouldn't like something they're good at, all the more if they had to work to be good at it?

Annnnnnnnyway, I digress... other than that bit of unpleasant history, that story does bring up a few questions for me about situps and pushups. How do you do them? Like actual situps, or just like crunches? Pushups, there are alternate styles of as well. Or do you do both? You'll probably give me the military answer though, that being The Hard Way on both counts.
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post #31 of 41
Thread Starter 
[quote]Originally posted by tmp:
<strong>I am coming into this one a bit late, but here's my two cents.

I don't recommend running. It severly stresses the joints and connective tissues. Fast walking (4 mph) should do you fine. Biking is great, swimming is too. I also recommend Pilates or Yoga (you can get a video of these, or far better, take a class.), Yoga is, for me, one of the hardest workouts that I do. I take a Power Yoga class two times a week, and it has made a huge difference.

I do recommend a gym. I have found that if I have paid for it, I am likely to use it. Even though you might feel really self-concious going at first, I think it's worth it. I go to Crunch, a very trendy Hoolywood-y place here in LA. It's filled with 25 year olds with 5% body fat and 25% silicone, but I go. In old shorts and a t-shirt.

As for diet, unfortunately, common sense is really the only way to go. Look at the packages of everything you buy. If it has anything you can't pronounce, pass it up. If it has anything ending with an -ose (dextrose, fructose, etc.) put it back on the shelf. Stay out of any aisle that has pre-made or processed foods. I also suggest giving up caffeine and alcohol while you are on the diet. Go to the health food store once every two weeks even if you have to take a cab. If you buy a juice, make sure that it's juice, and not "juice drink". Drop bread entirely. Have pasta or rice infrequently. Before you grab that piece of chocolate or whatever, ask yourself, "Is this worth being fat over?" most times the answer is no. (of course, once in a great while you have to treat yourself to something. If you like chocolate, let yourself have a few ounces of of something wildly delicious once every two or three weeks, like some Valhrona, and really savor it.)

Diets are boring, no doubt about it. That's why people start popping pills and doing the "48 hour Hollywood Diet" crap. The b1tch part is that you basically have to just change the way that you eat and move to lose weight and keep it off. It's like getting religion or joining AA. And like AA, don't beat yourself up if you sleep late and miss a day, or get a cheeseburger at McD's. Everybody slips. The key is to get right back on the diet, right then. Don't say, I'll start tomorrow, or after that dinner party on Friday, or that trip to the club with my friends, or national sofa-care month, or whatever.

It's going to take work and time, but it took time to get you where you are now. And believe me: if I, whose dedication to doing nothing is formidable can do it, you can.
<a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0071383832/qid=1027543181/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_1/102-7172790-2254501" target="_blank">This book was helpful in jump-starting my system</a>

[ 07-24-2002: Message edited by: tmp ]</strong><hr></blockquote>

I don't think I'd be running anyway... I'm a little too self-conscious for that, and I doubt I could sustain what I consider to be actual running for long enough to get a decent workout or whatever.. <img src="graemlins/embarrassed.gif" border="0" alt="[Embarrassed]" /> But fast walking is good. Our dogs are so funny, they always walk fast and pull on the leash so that they almost choke themselves, so whenever I do go for walks in the park with a dog it's always a brisk one (but not a jog).

This is going to sound like I'm making excuses here, but there's no way I'm going to do any swimming because we don't have a pool and I'm just too self-conscious to start learning how, even if I were physically fit enough to handle it. Maybe someday.

And yoga... I have a few really cool friends who recommend, but I'm just not sure of it. It sounds.. well, to put it bluntly, like a yuppie/gay/pussy activity. Nothing against gays or anything, but that's the rep. I don't know how I would even go about breaking it to my mom, my family, my friends, my coworkers... I don't know, I'd like to take a class, but I need some help on how to correct the propaganda-like ideas of the general public and maybe I'll go for it... Then again, do fat people do yoga? I don't know. I don't want to gross out a room of people "at peace" or whatever. <img src="graemlins/hmmm.gif" border="0" alt="[Hmmm]" />

Thank you for the rest of your advice too. I'm going to join a gym in a few weeks (I'm having to make some large purchases lately, for my pay at least, like a car.. insurance.. license.. food.. etc), I'm going out walking in just a little bit (determined to get back into that habit!), and I'm going to start taking more fruit and veggies and salads (no dressing) and just water for lunch I think.
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post #32 of 41
Thread Starter 
[quote]Originally posted by Mulattabianca:
<strong>I guess i have the opposite problem .. i'm 5'10" tall and i guess soemthing like 105 to 110 lb (but don't want to be any heavier either). </strong><hr></blockquote>

Wow, I wish I had that problem. Eh, the grass is always greener I suppose.

I don't really care what I way, I just don't want to look fat. And of course to not look fat, I have to not be fat... I've been well-conditioned psychologically by today's world to look at fatness, being overweight, and obesity as a repulsive, disfiguring epidemic.

I guess my goal is to lose 35+ lbs by the end of this year, and keep it off through the holiday season, by adopting actually healthy eating habits and a good exercise regimen.. Then after that I'll have to assess things. I do have the ultimate goal of becoming a serious hottie, also fed by the unreachable standards set forth by society. But that's a ways off, I guess.
art may imitate life, but life imitates tv.
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art may imitate life, but life imitates tv.
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post #33 of 41
Thread Starter 
What are you guys' goals?

Also, is there anyone in the Omaha, Nebraska area looking for a workout buddy? <img src="graemlins/hmmm.gif" border="0" alt="[Hmmm]" />

[ 07-25-2002: Message edited by: bradbower ]</p>
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post #34 of 41
There are three different types of pushups: Wide Stance, Shoulder Width, and Ranger. Shoulder width should be self explanatory, just put your hands down at shoulder width, go down, and back up Wide stance puts your hands roughly perpindicular to your upper arm. Ranger stance is where both of your hands are practically right next to each other, inside the width of your shoulders. what I found extremely helpful was to get a pushup bar. There is this thing called the "Door Gym" that acts as a situp aid, a pushup bar, and a pullup bar. With the bar being used for pushups, it allows you to lower your body farther than you would normally be able to do. If you don't go down far enough, the pushup doesn't count, and I don't just mean technically. You're not going to be able to do a lot at first, but trust me, they come quick. You just have to stick to it.

There are a few variations on the situp as well. A traditional situp, where you lie on you back wth your knees bent, and while keeping your back completely straight, you "sit up" towards your knees. The Navy actually does "chinese situps". A chinese situp starts in the same stance, but place your hands on your thighs, and as you start to "situp", you have gone far enough when your hands extend to your kneecaps. You can also do crunches, basically just keep your back straight, chin high, and elevate your abdomen.

I personally had to work terribly hard to get where I am, and it wasn't easy... at all. You won't start off being able to do many reps... but really push yourself. When you think you can't do anymore, make yourself squeeze out two more. You have it in you. Remember, the mind tires before the body.

As for the self conscious issues, I understand where you're coming from, but if your physical fitness is important enough to you, you will overcome it. Maybe instead of Yoga, try a self defense class However, Yoga is a perfectly legit thing for a guy to do... think about the exercises.. they help

good luck
post #35 of 41
What an incredibly constructive thread.

Here's something that's not so constructive:
<a href="http://dailynews.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story2&cid=571&ncid=751&e=1&u=/nm/20020726/hl_nm/fastfood_dc" target="_blank">Man sues fast food chains over his obesity</a>

P.S. Yoga seems to be very much in the vogue now. I think anything that gets you out there doing something is cool. Too bad I'm such a slug <img src="graemlins/hmmm.gif" border="0" alt="[Hmmm]" /> .

Edit: Fixed smily.

[ 07-26-2002: Message edited by: frawgz ]</p>
post #36 of 41
[quote]Originally posted by Mulattabianca:
<strong>Mh i guess the most basic rule is FAT is FAT... so if you think every gram of fat you eat (bigmac has 36 g of fat!!!! plus potatoes) will be in your waist or a$$ .. you are gonna eat less fat!!

check somewhere a fat content table.. try it.
but don't eliminate the fats completely..
lets say at least 20g a day (as a man) but ALL of them.. so the ones that are already in the food you eat..


</strong><hr></blockquote>

Fats are necessary for life (our brain is full of fat), the more important thing to have a non variant weight is to have an balanced food : 50 % of glucids, 30 % proteine and 20 % lipids. That does not mean 100 g of glucid, 60 g of proteins and 40 g of lipid, that means that 50 % of the caloric energy is bring by glucid, 30 % by protein and 20 % of lipid. Lipid are more energetic than glucid or protein ; 100 g of lipids bring the same amount of calory than 220 g of glucids or proteins.

So the important is to have a balanced food.
post #37 of 41
[quote]Originally posted by bradbower:
<strong>What are you guys' goals?

[ 07-25-2002: Message edited by: bradbower ]</strong><hr></blockquote>

I think its important to set yourself goals, so long as they are realistic ones. You could always try aiming for the stars and you may reach the moon, but you could just as easily give up along the way. My goals are just to be fitter and stronger at the end of the month than I was as the beginning. Over the months and years, this adds up to alot of progress. When you achieve one realistic short term goal, it gives you the motivation and confidence to aim for others.

[ 07-27-2002: Message edited by: RodUK ]</p>
post #38 of 41
I found in my life inactivity was the biggest reason I put on weight.

The summer after I graduated high school all I really did was sit around and watch TV, played a little golf on occasion and generally had a good time.

In 2 months I put on about 20 pounds.

Anyway, after summer I decided that the only way I was ever going to loose any weight was if I got a job that was physically demanding, seen as though I had no personal motivation to exercise.

I got a job at a farm, where it's all physical all day, and in about 5 months lost 30 pounds and am as buff as ever.

Working on the farm is great because I only stop for my lunch when it's lunch time, and I'm not sitting around all day snacking, and I;m outside all day in the fresh air.

Getting paid to get in shape, that's the way I like it.
post #39 of 41
here is a quick article on cycling for people wanting to lose weight. It's short on details, but perhaps it will encourage you

<a href="http://bicycling.about.com/library/weekly/aa043001a.htm" target="_blank">http://bicycling.about.com/library/weekly/aa043001a.htm</a>
post #40 of 41
Also, try this link as well. It gives you a basis for how many calories you burn doing different activities, as well as talks about how to judge how many calories you should intake in a day to maintain body weight, or try and lose it. Basically, take your current weight, multiply it by 15. That's how many calories you need a day to maintain that weight. 500 calories less will lighten you, on average, a pound per week. Read the site, they explain it all...

<a href="http://www.shapeup.net/Calorie.html" target="_blank">http://www.shapeup.net/Calorie.html</a>
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