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Thunderbolt trademark rights will be transferred from Apple to Intel

post #1 of 30
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Though Apple originally filed for ownership of the "Thunderbolt" trademark associated with its new high-speed data port, the rights will be transferred to Intel, the company with which it cooperatively developed the new standard.

Intel said that though Apple filed for the original trademark, the Mac maker is currently in the process of transferring the rights to chipmaker Intel, according to Bright Side of News. The report also noted that Apple "will continue to have unrestricted use of the technology."

"As part of our collaboration with Apple, they did some of the initial trademark filings," Intel Senior Communications Manager Dave Salvator reportedly said. "Intel has full rights to the Thunderbolt trademark now and into the future. The Thunderbolt name will be used going forward on all platforms, irrespective of operating system."

The news comes as PC maker Sony has revealed plans to adopt Thunderbolt technology, but with a standard USB connector instead of the DisplayPort connector utilized by Apple. The report noted that it's likely that Sony's utilization could be rebranded, much as its version of FireWire became dubbed i.LINK.

Earlier this week, it was revealed that it was Apple who filed for the trademark associated with Thunderbolt high-speed input/output technology. The filing took place in both U.S. and Canadian trademark offices, and made no mention of Intel.

Intel originally codenamed the technology "Light Peak, but decided on the Thunderbolt moniker during the development process. Apple contributed to the development by including the mini DisplayPort standard and an "electrical solution" that changed the original optical cables to copper to provide power.



Apple introduced Thunderbolt in its refreshed lineup of MacBook Pros earlier this year. And earlier this month, Thunderbolt also came to Apple's new iMacs.

While Apple is expected to quickly bring Thunderbolt technology to the rest of its Mac lineup, and Sony plans to implement its own unique take, other companies have been less sold on the technology. This week, an executive with PC maker Hewlett-Packard said that the company has decided for now to stick with USB 3.0 for its next-generation high-speed I/O technology.

Intel has said it views USB 3.0 and Thunderbolt as "complementary" to one another. The chipmaker has also encouraged developers to support both the Thunderbolt and USB 3.0 standards with any external peripherals. The 5Gbps transfer speeds of USB 3.0 are half as fast as the 10Gbps throughput of Thunderbolt.
post #2 of 30
I still think Light Peak is a far better name...
post #3 of 30
Either one is better than USB!
post #4 of 30
Why does the symbol have to be the same as high voltage?
post #5 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic_Al View Post

Why does the symbol have to be the same as high voltage?

I must admit, the symbol certainly does not give the image of "the fastest way between two points is a straight line!"
post #6 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic_Al View Post

Why does the symbol have to be the same as high voltage?

Goes with the name, I guess. Its an odd mix of power branding and marketing imo. But anyway, for me, the big issue is convenience. Less cable clutter. I want to see solutions which will make my desk look good and less like a plate of spagetti. Its getting better, slowly, but my monitor still has a big fat cable that goes to my MBP, with 3(!) connectors. It also has a big fat power cable and because I need the key pad - a usb cable to my keyboard. Oh, and a USB to my speakers. And a USB to my TM HD.

My dream would be one thin cable to my monitor. One thin cable to my MBP. Both these cables to an out of sight break-out box with power and legacy (inc usb) ports.
post #7 of 30
Yeah they should just call it HSP (high-speed port). Thunderbolt sounds like something went wrong with cloud computing.

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post #8 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic_Al View Post

Why does the symbol have to be the same as high voltage?

technically, it's a lightning bolt.
with an arrow.
but anyway.


So Sony's gonna add another proprietary implementation to their list of memory stick duos, UMDs, etc, etc....
post #9 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The chipmaker has also encouraged developers to support both the Thunderbolt and USB 3.0 standards with any external peripherals. The 5Gbps transfer speeds of USB 3.0 are half as fast as the 10Gbps throughput of Thunderbolt.

Sam, shouldnt it read 20Gbps bandwidth for 10Gbps bi-directional compared to USBs 5Gbps maximum bandwidth?
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post #10 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by katastroff View Post

So Sony's gonna add another proprietary implementation to their list of memory stick duos, UMDs, etc, etc....

I dont think it will be a big deal, at least not to us. Since its protocol independent and the USB port interface is ubiquotus it should be easy enough to connect to your Thunderbolt-capable peripherals with a simple adapter or cable from monoprice.com.

The USB-IF might have an issue with it, which is what I heard kept Intel from added it to the USB port interface thus having to go to Apple for an alternate solution.
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post #11 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Yeah they should just call it HSP (high-speed port). Thunderbolt sounds like something went wrong with cloud computing.

Nothing should have to be called anything. We should just be able to say, "Oh, just plug your [insert peripheral here] in and we'll [insert action relevant to aforementioned peripheral here].

Which is what Thunderbolt will do, except it has a name right now to differentiate from all other (read: legacy) ports.

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post #12 of 30
Guess I'm the only one who does like the Thunderbolt name. I mean, Lightpeak would be better (as one word), but Thunderbolt is better than "USB".
post #13 of 30
IMHO, the trademark transfer has to do with making Thunderbolt more palatable to PC manufacturers. By removing Apple from the filing it makes it that much easier to pay the licensing fees. HP stated it wanted to stick with USB 3.0. Why? Because it's slower? No, b/c it doesn't want to pay a licensing fee to Apple (a competitor). Surprised Apple/Intel missed getting this right from the get-go...
post #14 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by WEV View Post

IMHO, the trademark transfer has to do with making Thunderbolt more palatable to PC manufacturers. By removing Apple from the filing it makes it that much easier to pay the licensing fees. HP stated it wanted to stick with USB 3.0. Why? Because it's slower? No, b/c it doesn't want to pay a licensing fee to Apple (a competitor). Surprised Apple/Intel missed getting this right from the get-go...

You mean that licensing fee for the mini-DisplayPort style connector?
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post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Yeah they should just call it HSP (high-speed port). Thunderbolt sounds like something went wrong with cloud computing.

and exactly on target!
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post #16 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Sam, shouldnt it read 20Gbps bandwidth for 10Gbps bi-directional compared to USBs 5Gbps maximum bandwidth?

YOU are correct sir!

And USB is "bursty" and that 5 Gbps is not guaranteed. So it requires low humidity, the right time of day, and the wind at your back.

>> And I think that Apple is giving INTEL the trademark -- because they REALLY want adoption of the standard -- rather than the limited adoption we saw with FireWire.

Should really cut down on all the equipment junk, and power adapters we all use.
post #17 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by majjo View Post

I wonder if it will keep the same name when it switches to optical... just doesn't seem right if it does imo

Why? The port's identical. The spec is identical. They didn't call Ethernet anything different when it went optical. They don't call Wi-Fi anything different between 802.11a/b/g/n/ac.

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post #18 of 30
Sony decision to use USB connector instead of mini display port would only messes with the public mind IMO. We already have headaches from figuring out which side USB tab is located when connecting the cables we don't want people to complain the transfer rate is slow because people connecting USB devices unknowingly on these thunderbolt-enabled connector. Go mend PSN properly first!
post #19 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by katastroff View Post

technically, it's a lightning bolt.
with an arrow.
but anyway.


So Sony's gonna add another proprietary implementation to their list of memory stick duos, UMDs, etc, etc....



The funny thing about Sony is I don't think they ever set out to make proprietary technology. They are just so arrogant that they believe that they are creating the next "standard" and that everyone will adopt it simply because it is far superior. They have missed the mark almost every time since betamax but they keep trying hopping to have a winner. Kind of reminds me of Wile E. Coyote.
post #20 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by eswinson View Post

The funny thing about Sony is I don't think they ever set out to make proprietary technology.

I don't believe that for a second.

I DO believe that occasionally Apple sets out to HAVE proprietary technology, but then what they use works so freaking well that everyone adopts it and it becomes a standard.

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post #21 of 30
And where the hell is all that kit I´m waiting for??? It certainly doesnt look good that there are just a few pieces of hardware you can stick to if you want to use this...
post #22 of 30
Thunderbolt doesn't seem to be getting any momentum. I think it's Apple's fault for not using the USB connector like Sony did.

People who think the connector doesn't matter don't understand what product people want. They want something that goes faster, period. i.e. something exactly the same as what they have now but faster.

They don't want a new concept to learn ("Thunderbolt"). They don't want a new tech mystery for the nerd at the store to make them feel stupid about. They don't want a new connector to learn, another shape to remember. All those things are the WRONG PRODUCT, and if that's the price they have to pay for the speed, they will just leave it on the shelf for as long as possible until the slowness of the solutions they already know becomes unbearable.

Yes, the USB committee objected, but if you're not willing to ignore that you're not going to be successful. As currently implemented, the whole thing is just a waste of everybody's time (which is ironic for high-speed port).
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Thunderbolt doesn't seem to be getting any momentum. I think it's Apple's fault for not using the USB connector like Sony did.

People who think the connector doesn't matter don't understand what product people want. They want something that goes faster, period. i.e. something exactly the same as what they have now but faster.

They don't want a new concept to learn ("Thunderbolt"). They don't want a new tech mystery for the nerd at the store to make them feel stupid about. They don't want a new connector to learn, another shape to remember. All those things are the WRONG PRODUCT, and if that's the price they have to pay for the speed, they will just leave it on the shelf for as long as possible until the slowness of the solutions they already know becomes unbearable.

Thunderbolt was only introduced 3 months ago and its only on MacBook Pros and iMacs. We still need to see the MacBook, MacBook Air, Mac mini and Mac Pro added to that list, not to mention seeing iDevices and other peripherals support Thunderbolt.

This is Intels tech and they reportedly tried to use USB for the port but were denied by the USB-IF despite Intel being the originators of USB. What Sony is doing may be kosher and they may not even be able to call it Thunderbolt even though it could function the same as Intels implementation.

Even if Intel could have used USB for the port interface its still a new concept to learn. At least there isnt a new port interface added to Macs. We might even see Thunderbolt on each side of the MBPs once they remove the ODD and they can put ports on each side at the back of the machine.

With any new tech it takes time for adoption to occur but at the same time there cant be adoption without someone taking that first step. I dont see how Thunderbolt-based peripherals wont be commonplace at next years CES.

I wouldnt be surprised to see Apple do what it did with the iPod once it went to USB. IOW, I can see Apple adding Thunderbolt to the iPhone 5. This will allow faster syncing and faster charging over Thunderbolt. The question is does the 30-pin connector need to be changed to do this or can it use the currently free FireWire pins?

What if they can use the current 30-pin setup but have to pull pins from USB to do it; how would someone that doesnt have a newer MBP sync and charge? They could include a power adapter with Thunderbolt at the end (but the EU wants USB). They could include a USB-to-Thunderbolt adapter and the iPhone.

There is a good case to be made that Apple wont add support for iDevices until there is more adoption of Thunderbolt, but they cant get adoption until people buy Macs with Thunderbolt. Either way they have to start somewhere.
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post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by majjo View Post

I wonder if it will keep the same name when it switches to optical... just doesn't seem right if it does imo

I'd guess that's at least the reason they didn't use Light Peak. No sense calling it Light Peak when it doesn't use light. A Thunderbolt on the other hand is a bolt of illuminating electricity (aka lightning) so covers both scenarios - I actually like it. But I also like the Thundercats:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Qd_IsxgAf8

Feel the magic, hear the roar, Thunderbolt hooooooo.

In a year's time, over 15 million devices will have this technology and manufacturers will have to sit up and take notice. You cannot run a GPU from USB 3 but you can over Thunderbolt - 'nuff said.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii

They don't want a new concept to learn ("Thunderbolt"). They don't want a new tech mystery for the nerd at the store to make them feel stupid about. They don't want a new connector to learn, another shape to remember.

It's the same shape as Mini displayport so not entirely new. Apple couldn't have feasibly used USB because you'd need a different cable for daisy-chaining. The buck stops with Intel and they picked the Mini-DP port.
post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

In a year's time, over 15 million devices will have this technology and manufacturers will have to sit up and take notice. You cannot run a GPU from USB 3 but you can over Thunderbolt - 'nuff said.

So you could conceivably have an iPad-like device as your sole computer with an external Apple display that houses USB, FireWire and audio jacks, Ethernet, large HDD storage, and a powerful GPU within the monitor casing?
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post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

So you could conceivably have an iPad-like device as your sole computer with an external Apple display that houses USB, FireWire and audio jacks, Ethernet, large HDD storage, and a powerful GPU within the monitor casing?

The return of the DuoDock!

Except it would have to be given a Post-Steve name. Let's assume it won't be run by iPads, but by the MacBook family. MacDock, then? iDock just sounds stupid and DockMac sounds too close to .Mac.

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post #27 of 30
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Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

The return of the DuoDock!

Except it would have to be given a Post-Steve name. Let's assume it won't be run by iPads, but by the MacBook family. MacDock, then? iDock just sounds stupid and DockMac sounds too close to .Mac.

Youve seen the Motorola Atrix. If anyone can pull off dual-UI running on a Darwin OS on ARM its Apple.

If they do adapt Mac OS Aqua UI to be available on their iOS-based iDevices I wonder if the analysts would then allow the iPad to be considered a PC."
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post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

If they do adapt Mac OS Aqua UI to be available on their iOS-based iDevices...

Though I fear the opposite is what will happen. Launchpad (and most of the rest of Lion) virtually proves that, though Lion's Spotlight needs to get ported to iOS posthaste (read: it's unlike iOS, but it's great).

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post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

So you could conceivably have an iPad-like device as your sole computer with an external Apple display that houses USB, FireWire and audio jacks, Ethernet, large HDD storage, and a powerful GPU within the monitor casing?

Yes, although they likely wouldn't use the GPU that way because it would need custom drivers and would have limited benefits for the iPad with the software library it has.

The external GPU over Thunderbolt only really benefits the low-end Macs at the moment.

However, with Apple helping to drive Intel's roadmap, I could see a switch from ARM to x86 down the road so that Mac OS and iOS are one and the same. Then you could easily run your entire computing experience from your iPhone, iPod or iPad. By then, the mobile GPUs will probably be fairly quick though so an external would offer little benefit.
post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

The external GPU over Thunderbolt only really benefits the low-end Macs at the moment.

I see a future Mac Mini... 1"x5"x1"... only has room for a CPU and RAM. SSD attached via Thunderbolt, chained to a swappable GPU, chained to a monitor.

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