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Windows PC makers demonstrate Thunderbolt support for 2012 debut

post #1 of 30
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PC makers Acer and Asustek have joined Apple in announcing support for Intel's Thunderbolt high speed data interconnect, saying they will add the technology to PCs next year.

Intel noted the two companies as new adopters of Thunderbolt standard at its Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco today, demonstrating the technology working on a Windows PC, according to report by PC World.

Acer and Asustek have previously bet on netbooks, but Acer, the fifth largest PC maker worldwide after HP, Dell, Apple and Toshiba, saw its sales contract by more than 25 percent over the last year as the market for netbooks as collapsed in the wake of iPad. Both companies are now working with Intel to develop "ultrabooks" similar to Apple's wildly successful MacBook Air line.

Thunderbolt, which combines DisplayPort video and PCI Express on a single cable, has been essentially exclusive to Apple throughout 2011. The Mac maker first announced the port on MacBook Pros in the spring, and then brought it to the Mac mini, iMac and MacBook Air this summer.

HP, the world's largest PC maker, discounted the standard in May, with its worldwide marketing manager Xavier Lauwaert saying at the time, "We did look at [Thunderbolt]. We're still looking into it. Haven't found a value proposition yet."

Lauwaert said PC makers were "content" with USB 3.0, characterizing Thunderbolt as a "more fancy solution" that HP is "not convinced" it should pursue. HP is currently determining whether to spin off its PC group or sell it to another company.

Sony announced a high end notebook in June which incorporated a proprietary version of the technology in its docking station, but is not branded as Thunderbolt nor physically compatible with existing Thunderbolt cables.

Apple has filed a trademark on the Thunderbolt name and logo, though the Mac maker will eventually transfer the rights to Intel.

post #2 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Lauwaert said PC makers were "content" with USB 3.0, characterizing Thunderbolt as a "more fancy solution" that HP is "not convinced" it should pursue. HP is currently determining whether to spin off its PC group or sell it to another company.

I see what you did there, Daniel.
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post #3 of 30
I just hope they do the right thing and everyone settles on one cable/connection standard.
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Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #4 of 30
Where are the people saying that Thunderbolt is just another FireWire?
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post #5 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


PC makers Acer and Asustek have joined Apple in announcing support for Intel's Thunderbolt ...

Acer and Asustek have previously bet on netbooks...as the market for netbooks as collapsed


Uh oh. They bet on netbooks, and now they bet on Thunderbolt. Not a particularly ringing endorsement of Apple's new tech, eh?
post #6 of 30
Time will tell if the public prefers backward compatibility (USB 3.0) to higher speed (Thunderbolt). Superior technology is frequently slain by the ubiquitous.

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post #7 of 30
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Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

Uh oh. They bet on netbooks, and now they bet on Thunderbolt. Not a particularly ringing endorsement of Apple's new tech, eh?

On the contrary... Apple never bet on netbooks knowing they weren't worth it. Acer and Asustek having one failure under their belt have decided to go with the winning team this time.
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post #8 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

Time will tell if the public prefers backward compatibility (USB 3.0) to higher speed (Thunderbolt). Many a superior technology has been slain by the ubiquitous.

But they're not mutually exclusive, and with Intel supporting both and an external display port one of those requirements that oft go unused having Thunderbolt seems like something that will catch on.
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post #9 of 30
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Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

But they're not mutually exclusive, and with Intel supporting both and an external display port one of those requirements that oft go unused having Thunderbolt seems like something that will catch on.

I hope it does. I am all for discarding older standards (i.e. Flash).

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post #10 of 30
Having used Firewire when it first came out, and loved it in my niche, I have been trialling Thunderbolt Pegasus R6 Raid on my desk to my macbook pro this week. In my report to management, I resorted to calling it "STUPENDOUSLY FAST" as "610MB/s write speeds" didn't seem to really convey how fricking awesome this box is. No matter how many other people use it, I am, and it will rock my world. I don't care if even one other person uses it ;-)
post #11 of 30
This is good news for any of us who bought new Macs.
post #12 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

Time will tell if the public prefers backward compatibility (USB 3.0) to higher speed (Thunderbolt). Superior technology is frequently slain by the ubiquitous.

In a way, Thunderbolt is more backwards compatible than USB3.0, as it floats an entire PCIE channel over the wire. Virtually every peripheral that can be put on the motherboard can now be put on the far end of a Thunderbolt link, including a set of USB3.0 ports.
post #13 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsimpsen View Post

In a way, Thunderbolt is more backwards compatible than USB3.0, as it floats an entire PCIE channel over the wire. Virtually every peripheral that can be put on the motherboard can now be put on the far end of a Thunderbolt link, including a set of USB3.0 ports.

I hadn't thought about it that way. You have made a very compelling argument for Thunderbolt's potential success.

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post #14 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

I hadn't thought about it that way. You have made a very compelling argument for Thunderbolt's potential success.

It makes Thunderbolt the perfect solution for a complete docking station, see the Apple Thunderbolt display with USB, Firewire, Ethernet, Sound, Video feed and Display in one cable.
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post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

Time will tell if the public prefers backward compatibility (USB 3.0) to higher speed (Thunderbolt). Superior technology is frequently slain by the ubiquitous.

USB 3.0 is an interface. Thunderbolt is an interconnect.

You might as well say "people want USB, not PCI."

FW and USB were somewhat comparable. Thunderbolt is one port that delivers video output (to multiple displays), supports extremely high data connections to external disks, and works like an expansion dock for connecting everything from Gigabit Ethernet to external video cards.

PC makers don't have to embrace Thunderbolt for it to be successful. In fact, most won't because $500 PCs and $300 netbooks don't need a fast interconnect. Thunderbolt will serve to distinguish computers worthy of a $1000+ price tag, a market Apple already dominates.
post #16 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Where are the people saying that Thunderbolt is just another FireWire?

There.

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post #17 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post

USB 3.0 is an interface. Thunderbolt is an interconnect.

That's a great statement.
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post #18 of 30
Quote:
Acer and Asustek have previously bet on netbooks, but Acer, the fifth largest PC maker worldwide after HP, Dell, Apple and Toshiba, saw its sales contract by more than 25 percent over the last year as the market for netbooks as collapsed in the wake of iPad.

Mac users start referring to a Mac as a "PC" when it is convenient to.
post #19 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggar View Post

Mac users start referring to a Mac as a "PC" when it is convenient to.

Since when are Macs not personal computers? Since when have they not been included in personal computer sales? Since when they have not competed with personal computer sales?
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post #20 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Since are Macs not personal computers? Since when have they not been included in personal computer sales? Since when they have not competed with personal computer sales?

Is HEY, you changed your post! You can't get in trouble for telling the truth. I don't think I've ever seen an infraction put in place for breaking the rules against a blatant troll.
post #21 of 30
Why are so many people hell bent on declaring that there must be one winner? Why can't we just have both?

Devices like the Sony Vaio Z and the Pegasus R4 clearly show functionality of Thunderbolt that USB3 simply can't do.

However putting an expensive Thunderbolt controller in something like a mouse, keyboard SD card reader or cheap flash drive is pointless.

Obviously the technologies overlap in some points (like a single external hard drive) but I see them largely as complimentary technologies.
post #22 of 30
Agreed on all fronts. I want Thunderbird on my pc's and macs. I also want USB 3. Why wouldn't you?

My question to all you experts is this: I'm looking to get a mac for the home. If I get an iMac, will there be a time when I can upgrade my pc with thunderbolt (I assume I'll need a new mobo and video card) and have it output video to the iMac display, like the current lineup supposedly can do?

At 27", I don't want to have 2 monitors . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post

Why are so many people hell bent on declaring that there must be one winner? Why can't we just have both?

Devices like the Sony Vaio Z and the Pegasus R4 clearly show functionality of Thunderbolt that USB3 simply can't do.

However putting an expensive Thunderbolt controller in something like a mouse, keyboard SD card reader or cheap flash drive is pointless.

Obviously the technologies overlap in some points (like a single external hard drive) but I see them largely as complimentary technologies.
post #23 of 30
Pleased as punch that I have an Air with Thunderbolt

In a few years I'll probably look around and marvel at how Thunderbolt has made my life easy.


Holy Grail 2013

Being able to plug your 11" ARM based MBA into an iMac and suddenly leverage all the port connectivity and processing power of the iMac via Grand Central Dispatch 3 and Open CL 2.x

It's the muthfunkin return of the Duo Dock people (I just totally revealed my age on that one)
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post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by beastvince View Post

It makes Thunderbolt the perfect solution for a complete docking station, see the Apple Thunderbolt display with USB, Firewire, Ethernet, Sound, Video feed and Display in one cable.

Think even further, enter the Apple Cinema Pro display with built in fibre-channel & high end Graphics card with memory that extends your laptop's current video capability. The possibilities are so endless it's scary!!!
post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by hezetation View Post

Think even further, enter the Apple Cinema Pro display with built in fibre-channel & high end Graphics card

It's called an iMac.
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

It's called an iMac.

Yeah, guess considering the price on the 2. Of course there is quite a big difference in managing a single OS install that you dock to a more powerful station vs 2 standalone OS installs.
post #27 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by hezetation View Post

Yeah, guess considering the price on the 2. Of course there is quite a big difference in managing a single OS install that you dock to a more powerful station vs 2 standalone OS installs.

iCloud closes that gap by a fair amount.
post #28 of 30
thunderbolt is nice, but the announcements of USB 3.0 on a mac will be a greater please to me!
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by accessoriesguy View Post

thunderbolt is nice, but the announcements of USB 3.0 on a mac will be a greater please to me!

Why, when Thunderbolt already covers USB 3.0 and is a smaller port, allowing for more of them per computer than you could ever get of USB 3.0?
post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBFromOZ View Post

Having used Firewire when it first came out, and loved it in my niche, I have been trialling Thunderbolt Pegasus R6 Raid on my desk to my macbook pro this week. In my report to management, I resorted to calling it "STUPENDOUSLY FAST" as "610MB/s write speeds" didn't seem to really convey how fricking awesome this box is. No matter how many other people use it, I am, and it will rock my world. I don't care if even one other person uses it ;-)

That sounds pretty awesome. I haven't seen one of those in action. On the Apple site they look pretty tightly packed. How are the drive temps? Does it support SMART data or give temperature readouts or just a dumb box? Are the fans locked in speed and if so how quiet or noisy does it run? I'm just wondering because it sounds pretty awesome. Damn you form making me want one


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Why, when Thunderbolt already covers USB 3.0 and is a smaller port, allowing for more of them per computer than you could ever get of USB 3.0?

I've mentioned this before but it would have to be a lot cheaper to displace usb3. It would have to be at a level where Apple would actually begin shipping thunderbolt mice and keyboards, and integrate thunderbolt connections onto every IOS device. Furthermore you'd need enough ports. You can't just expect everyone to use a hub, and the thunderbolt display isn't really a solution to that considering the imac and laptops have their own displays already (and the mac pro can't even use it ).
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