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iOS 6.1 sees 22% adoption in less than two days, could be fastest ever

post #1 of 89
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After launching on Monday, iOS 6.1 is already being used by nearly 22 percent of users monitored by one Web content firm, setting up Apple's newest mobile OS update to be the most quickly adopted to date.

iOS 6.1


Data collected by Onswipe, a web content creation company, shows that as of 3 p.m. EST Wednesday, iOS 6.1 has been adopted by 21.81 percent of about 13 million iOS users observed from sites using the firm's technology, reports TechCrunch. The adoption rate has been strong, going from 11.35 percent in the first 24 hours of availability to 16.92 percent earlier today.

Breaking down updates by device, the iPhone was at 23.92 percent, while the iPad peaked at a slightly lower 20.90 percent. The overall 21.81 percent adoption factors in all iOS devices including the iPod touch.

In comparison to iOS 6.1, Onswipe saw Apple's last update, the major version change to iOS 6, take an entire week to penetrate 44.58 percent of the installed user base. The company's CEO Jason Baptiste attributes the spike in adoption to customer familiarity with Apple's over-the-air update system that debuted with iOS 5 in 2011.

Wednesday's report is in line with data gathered by other firms like Chitika, which estimated that iOS 6 saw a 15 percent adoption rate after 24 hours, but took over a month to surpass 60 percent.

When the newest iOS update was released on Monday, Apple's Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing Philip Schiller noted that iOS 6 is now running on 300 million iPhone, iPad and iPod touch devices after being available for only five months.

"It may be the most popular new version of an OS in history," he said.
post #2 of 89
47.6% are still on all of Android version 2.3. The last Gingerbread update was released 2 years ago.

It's been 10 months since the very last ICS update and yet version 4.0.x still totals only 9%. All of Jelly Bean — not just the latest point update from November 27, 2012 — only totals 10.2%.

This has to be rough on developers that are tying to actually make a good product.





edit: typos
Edited by SolipsismX - 1/31/13 at 8:30am

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post #3 of 89
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Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

47.6% are still on Android version 2.3.x. The last Gingerbread update was released 2 years ago. It's been 10 months since the very last ICS update and yet version 4.0.x still totals only 9%. All of Jelly Bean — not just the latest point update from November 27, 2012 — only totals 1.2%.

 

      Wasn't this article about iOS? 

post #4 of 89
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Originally Posted by Andrey View Post

      Wasn't this article about iOS? 

Yes, and I'm contrasting the two.

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post #5 of 89
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Originally Posted by Andrey View Post

Wasn't this article about iOS? 

True... but Apple does not live in a vacuum.

It's good to keep tabs on the competition. Lots of stuff happening out there. I enjoyed the Blackberry article today too.

Smartphone OS adoption rate of all platforms is interesting as well.
post #6 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Yes, and I'm contrasting the two.

 

This comparison by version numbers means nothing. Android is used by many manufacturers and has completely different adoption pattern.

post #7 of 89
Excellent graph to post, Solipsism. I think the high adoption rate to upgrades is also a result for the delta updates we now have. That, and the fact that the process is so smooth and simply always works I don't even bother to do updates at home, backing up first, clean reboot and all that. Nope, just install the update.

OT: I wonder how these phones from 2009 are doing. Will the latches from their SD Card slot have broken off and such? Removable battery not removable anymore? OT, just in case some1 whines over this
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post #8 of 89
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Originally Posted by Andrey View Post

This comparison by version numbers means nothing. Android is used by many manufacturers and has completely different adoption pattern.

And that is one of the reasons why developers choose iOS, there's simply way less incentive to code for Android.
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post #9 of 89
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Originally Posted by Andrey View Post

This comparison by version numbers means nothing. Android is used by many manufacturers and has completely different adoption pattern.

Your reasons why it means nothing are exactly why it means everything.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Excellent graph to post, Solipsism. I think the high adoption rate to upgrades is also a result for the delta updates we now have. That, and the fact that the process is so smooth and simply always works I don't even bother to do updates at home, backing up first, clean reboot and all that. Nope, just install the update.

I'd say OTA updates, delta updates, the device letting you know there is an update, the congruency of having all iDevices that can update be updatable at the same time making it much more well known to the average user, the growth rate* of the platform with new devices that can all get the same update, and supporting devices with the newest update for 3 full generations (in most cases) really help make this a solid platform and ecosystem that has no equal.



* Apple has previous stated that each new iPhone model outsells all previous iPhone models before it. I would imagine that's also true for the iPad.

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post #10 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


And that is one of the reasons why developers choose iOS, there's simply way less incentive to code for Android.

 

   Are you developer? Do you have experience with both iOS and Android? 

post #11 of 89

Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Your reasons why it means nothing are exactly why it means everything

 

   OEMs for android phones have no interest for adoption of newer versions for discontinued hardware. They just release new phones with new software. This is what I meant by different pattern.

post #12 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrey View Post

   OEMs for android phones have no interest for adoption of newer versions for discontinued hardware. They just release new phones with new software. This is what I meant by different pattern.

Based on Google's stated activation numbers vendors aren't using the new software or the adoption wouldn't be dominated by an OS that stopped being updated 2 years ago.

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post #13 of 89
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Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Based on Google's stated activation numbers vendors aren't using the new software or the adoption wouldn't be dominated by an OS that stopped being updated 2 years ago.

 

  Well, whatever. I just updated my and daughter's iPads and I can bet my wife will find out in few months that there was an update. Not everyone is geek and don't even care. ICS and JB just like completely different software while iOS 6.1 isn't different from 4.x 

post #14 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrey View Post

 

   Are you developer? Do you have experience with both iOS and Android? 


I am and I do. And it is a big effing pain to test apps on Android. I am lucky that I am primarily doing this for "in-house" apps for companies that only deploy a limited number of varieties of Android devices. But if I were doing this for selling to consumers at large, I'd be testing on more devices than I'd care for. On the other hand, Android offers more flexibility. But this doesn't outweigh the extra pain.

post #15 of 89
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Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post

Maybe users are just that desperate to see speed improvements after ios 6 slowed their devices to a painful extent. Too bad there aren't any speed improvements listed as changes.

 

Nothing is wrong with 6, at least on Retina and Mini.

post #16 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post


I am and I do. And it is a big effing pain to test apps on Android. I am lucky that I am primarily doing this for "in-house" apps for companies that only deploy a limited number of varieties of Android devices. But if I were doing this for selling to consumers at large, I'd be testing on more devices than I'd care for. On the other hand, Android offers more flexibility. But this doesn't outweigh the extra pain.

 

Our primary platform is Windows/AIX but we have few apps for Android/iOS tablets and for iPod with third party IR scanner. No issues for both.

post #17 of 89
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Originally Posted by Andrey View Post

 

   Are you developer? Do you have experience with both iOS and Android? 

Help I have falen and I my mind can't get up.

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post #18 of 89
There's also a fundamental difference in the way software is handled by Apple compared to all the other Android OEMs.

Apple provides their software for their hardware. When it comes times to update your iPhone, iPad or iPod... you download the software directly from Apple servers.... and they know exactly the device you're using.

On Android... it's different. In the first place... the OEMs have to get a copy on Android from Google... and tweak it work on each of their devices at launch. That takes time. Then they have to do all that again when there's an update. So not only did they have to massage a version of Android when they first released the phone... they would have to do it each time an update comes around. Then multiply that by however many devices they have... it could be a dozen or more.

Plus... the OEMs only make money when you buy a new device... so what's the real incentive to update an older phone? Some may offer an update once... but the vast majority of Android phones rarely get more than one update.

And we haven't even mentioned the carrier's role in all of this. Some Android updates come from the carrier. So that's 3 parties involved... Google, the manufacturer, and the carrier.

No wonder why Apple devices get updates faster... they control everything end-to-end.

Android has too many hands stirring the pot.
post #19 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrey View Post

Are you developer? Do you have experience with both iOS and Android? 

No, and although I understand the relevance, not being a developer doesn't mean I can't tell the difference for the incentive to develop for one platform over the other. I just look at the market, and come to the conclusion there is a solid reason to disregard Android altogether. For developers, that is.

But don't take the word from some fool on the internet, look around, perhaps you'll come across graphs like these;




link
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post #20 of 89
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Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


No, and although I understand the relevance, not being a developer doesn't mean I can't tell the difference for the incentive to develop for one platform over the other. I just look at the market, and come to the conclusion there is a solid reason to disregard Android altogether. For developers, that is.

But don't take the word from some fool on the internet, look around, perhaps you'll come across graphs like these

link

Why go to the Guardian to get old AppAnnie graph links? Today's AppAnnie blog article is here. The title? The Rise of Google Play

http://blog.appannie.com/app-annie-index-january-2013/?utm_source=appannie&utm_medium=homepage&utm_campaign=c00063

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post #21 of 89
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Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Why go to the guardian to get old AppAnnie graph links? Today's AppAnnie blog article is here. The title? The Rise of Google Play

Uhm, because I didn't know of AppAnnie? And therefore: big thanks for the link! This could be a revelation for someone else as well.
Oh, and yes, of course GooglePlay is on the rise: being nowhere the only way is up. Similar to Apple's OSX marketshare; that'll only rise.
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post #22 of 89
Quote:

 

Originally Posted by Andrey View Post

 

      Wasn't this article about iOS? 

 

Yes, but to know how good something is, it helps to sometimes point out how terrible something else is. And Android is indeed terrible, I pity all of the cheap souls who are stuck using that miserable OS.

post #23 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrey View Post

 

This comparison by version numbers means nothing. Android is used by many manufacturers and has completely different adoption pattern.

And that's just one of the many reasons why it is suck a sucky OS, providing a terrible end user experience.

post #24 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrey View Post

 

   Are you developer? Do you have experience with both iOS and Android? 

You don't have to be a developer to know that iOS is far superior to the miserable OS known as Android. Anybody who can read and is not ignorant knows that iOS is the platform of choice for the vast majority of developers, as that's where most of the money is. Android is where most of the cheapskates are and Android is also where the fragmentation exists.

post #25 of 89

As for the title of this article, I can believe it, because I updated a couple of my iOS devices yesterday afternoon, as soon as I noticed that there was a new OS update. It was an easy and quick process, smooth as butter. This is just one of the many reasons why iOS is so far ahead of anything else on the market. It is sleek, it is smooth and it is fast, and updates come from a central source, no matter where you live. Meanwhile, competitors are releasing 64 GB tablets that come with 23 GB of free user space. What a sleek and streamlined OS! lol.gif

post #26 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrey View Post

This comparison by version numbers means nothing. Android is used by many manufacturers and has completely different adoption pattern.

Why do you sound so defensive?
post #27 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrey View Post

   Are you developer? Do you have experience with both iOS and Android? 

I am, and I won't go near android.
post #28 of 89
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Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

You don't have to be a developer to know that iOS is far superior to the miserable OS known as Android.

 

Not true.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Anybody who can read and is not ignorant knows that iOS is the platform of choice for the vast majority of developers, as that's where most of the money is.

 

First part used to be absolutely true, but that's changing fast. Second part remains very true.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Android is where most of the cheapskates are and Android is also where the fragmentation exists.

 

First part is a myth that Apple shareholders have to stop deluding themselves with. There are many people who simply like other phones better. Often, price is part of the allure. But not always.

 

Second part remains true but it is less and less of an issue. We just get used to the pain of testing on multiple devices. Some companies test on 50 plus different phones, if not more, before deploying on apps on Android. We do about 5 because our apps are companies who control what phones their staff carry. But gradually, this issue is no different, or rather no more complex than developing Windows programs that need to work on XP, W7 and now W8, not to mention workstations, notebooks, netbooks, etc. made by different companies (which we used to do more of).

post #29 of 89
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Originally Posted by Andrey View Post

This comparison by version numbers means nothing. Android is used by many manufacturers and has completely different adoption pattern.

I think that was the point.

The Android adoption pattern is: "stick with the version that was on your phone when you bought it because we're dam%ed not going to make an update available for a phone that was already paid for."
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post #30 of 89
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Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

There's also a fundamental difference in the way software is handled by Apple compared to all the other Android OEMs.

Apple provides their software for their hardware. When it comes times to update your iPhone, iPad or iPod... you download the software directly from Apple servers.... and they know exactly the device you're using.

On Android... it's different. In the first place... the OEMs have to get a copy on Android from Google... and tweak it work on each of their devices at launch. That takes time. Then they have to do all that again when there's an update. So not only did they have to massage a version of Android when they first released the phone... they would have to do it each time an update comes around. Then multiply that by however many devices they have... it could be a dozen or more.

Plus... the OEMs only make money when you buy a new device... so what's the real incentive to update an older phone? Some may offer an update once... but the vast majority of Android phones rarely get more than one update.

And we haven't even mentioned the carrier's role in all of this. Some Android updates come from the carrier. So that's 3 parties involved... Google, the manufacturer, and the carrier.

No wonder why Apple devices get updates faster... they control everything end-to-end.

Android has too many hands stirring the pot.

 

^^^ This. Thanks, Mike.

post #31 of 89

22% for a point update (with no marketing) in 2 days, for an OS with this large of a userbase, is insane. I would have guess 10% at the most. 

post #32 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


I think that was the point.

The Android adoption pattern is: "stick with the version that was on your phone when you bought it because we're dam%ed not going to make an update available for a phone that was already paid for."

 

 

Correct, except for Nexus devices.

post #33 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

 

Not true.

 

 

First part used to be absolutely true, but that's changing fast. Second part remains very true.

 

 

First part is a myth that Apple shareholders have to stop deluding themselves with. There are many people who simply like other phones better. Often, price is part of the allure. But not always.

 

Second part remains true but it is less and less of an issue. We just get used to the pain of testing on multiple devices. Some companies test on 50 plus different phones, if not more, before deploying on apps on Android. We do about 5 because our apps are companies who control what phones their staff carry. But gradually, this issue is no different, or rather no more complex than developing Windows programs that need to work on XP, W7 and now W8, not to mention workstations, notebooks, netbooks, etc. made by different companies (which we used to do more of).

 

I'm assuming you're a developer from your post, so I have a sincere question. Isn't it irritating that when developing for Android, you can't really take advantage of new APIs and OS features, because such a low percentage of devices are running an updated OS? ie. many apps nowadays on iOS require at least iOS 5- which means that they're specifically taking advantage of new iOS5 APIs, etc and functionality would be impossible on older versions of the OS. They can develop the app in this way because they know a majority of the userbase is running that OS, so that isn't an issue. On Android, you still need to target Android 2.x. Doesn't this cripple what you can accomplish when making a modern app, in that it has to be compatible with ancient OS versions?

post #34 of 89

I know that personally, I have my hands full trying to program for iOS ... I'd probably shoot myself if I tried to keep up with all of the different flavors of Android in the wild ... and, that's not even taking into account the different screen sizes, resolutions and processor capabilities. Sheesh.

post #35 of 89
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Originally Posted by Andrey View Post

 

   Are you developer? Do you have experience with both iOS and Android? 

 

Just ask the BBC about the joys of developing for Android.

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post #36 of 89
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Originally Posted by Dave MacLachlan View Post

I know that personally, I have my hands full trying to program for iOS ... I'd probably shoot myself if I tried to keep up with all of the different flavors of Android in the wild ... and, that's not even taking into account the different screen sizes, resolutions and processor capabilities. Sheesh.

 

Well, in a real world..... If your client has corporate agreement with HP you will deploy your servers on HP-UX instead of AIX. Or if client is short on budget you'll run them on glassfish or jboss instead of weblogic. You also have to remember that some still will have XP workstations, some Vista, 7s, few 8s. Some will have Citrix farms, some will have staff accessing from outside on Windows terminal server. CPU, RAM, etc... have you seen Pocket PCs? We got those too. Same .NET programming as PC, same your CPU/OS requirements. Guess what! Nobody shoot himself. I can guarantee if we role play "princess on a pea" our business will be out of the picture. 

post #37 of 89

Guess what? In the "Real World," I'm developing for myself, not for a client. I'm not playing "princess and the pea," I'm playing "realize my own limited resources and work with them." I can't afford the time, effort or capital outlay to try and program for Android, no matter how limited the target platform may be. I'm strictly a one person operation. Realistically, for what I'm attempting, my only real shot at seeing any kind of return on my personal investment is if I write and sell something on the Apple App Store. If I were to attempt the same thing for the Android arena, I would be pouring money down the drain.

 

If you're working for a company that can afford to focus on multiple platforms, more power to you. I have to be realistic and aim for what is currently attainable for me in the immediate future.

post #38 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave MacLachlan View Post
 I'm playing "realize my own limited resources and work with them."
 

 

 

Ah, that makes sense. If I'll do something just for fun it will be for sure app for iPad, my favorite toy. 1smoking.gif


Edited by Andrey - 1/30/13 at 9:45pm
post #39 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrey View Post

 

   Are you developer? Do you have experience with both iOS and Android? 

 

Yes I do. Gave up on Android and now concentrate on iOS. However, at one time I worked with both to see which was better for my needs and what I wanted to do with my App. That said, I'm still very familiar with Android and keep up on all the changes from version to version, and I still keep the latest SDK around to play with.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

 

First part used to be absolutely true, but that's changing fast. Second part remains very true.

 

I still think the first part is true (developers favoring iOS). Ask Eric Schmidt how fast it's changing since he predicted back in Dec 2011 that Android would be the preferred platform for developers by June 2012. Here we are a year later and his prediction still hasn't come true.

 

Nobody I know is planning on devoting any time to Android. They aren't fooled by the "gazillion" activations per day since everyone knows devices like the GS3 represent a small portion of the market. Many Android devices sold (even today) are low end and still ship with Gingerbread. In 2013 brand new phones are being sold with Gingerbread. Ridiculous.

 

Schmidt was partially right. When Android market share passes iOS then developer interest will also go with it. But developers aren't concerned with "total market share" - they're concerned with how many devices can capably run their Apps.

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post #40 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

Nobody I know is planning on devoting any time to Android. They aren't fooled by the "gazillion" activations per day since everyone knows devices like the GS3 represent a small portion of the market.

Schmidt was partially right. When Android market share passes iOS then developer interest will also go with it. But developers aren't concerned with "total market share" - they're concerned with how many devices can capably run their Apps.

And... some places don't even have the Google Play Store. What good are gazillons of Android phones if people can't buy your app?

You're right... market share is only part of the story. You also have to consider which phones can run your apps... and whether the store is even available.

It's funny.... for years Apple has always touted the number of iTunes accounts and credit cards they have. As a user... I never really paid much attention to that. But it might be the dark horse in all of this.

iOS developers have certainly noticed this...
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