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Apple throws out the rulebook for its unique next-gen Mac Pro - Page 2

post #41 of 1290
It's a fantastic addition to the Mac lineup. Consumers will want it.

It's a horrible replacement for the Mac Pro tower. Real Pros will hate it.
post #42 of 1290
It's a cool concept! With the proliferation of NAS this solution makes sense. Up to 36 arrays is crazy! The amount of storage is up to you. You can start with internal storage, and add as many Thunderbolt NAS storage arrays ad you need. Keep data on arrays, upgrade to new machine when needed, keep the arrays. The cost is likely to be very high though, with Xeons, PCI-E ssd's and workstation graphics.

The business case would be a workstation class machine, with reduced tech support needed. The IT savings would easily pay for machines, at least thats my take.

For anyone that doesn't need workstation graphics, this is not likely for them. Disappointment will come to people that wanted the Mac Pro to have a good refresh (MB and CPU's) and up to date video cards that were all user upgradable. For the PC user that wants to move to OS X I'd suggest Mac mini's with NAS if you don't need heavy duty graphics, or the 27" iMac and be prepared to change machines when you need a new computer. They do have an advantage of having good resale values, or good hand me downs without getting bugged all the time with having to provide so much tech support.
post #43 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by kpluck View Post

I am going to go out on a limb and suggest professionals looking for a workstation don't have "marvel of packaging" high on their list of wanted features. The design of this machine was not done to meet the needs of professionals. It was done for Apple's need to minimize upgradeability to keep people buying new machines every few years.

 

Don't get me wrong, I think the design is cool and I think they will probably sell a lot of them. Lets face it, there are a lot of professional Apple users that will buy whatever Apple throws at them and learn to deal with any limitations it may have. From a business standpoint, I think it is an amazing design. But from a professional user standpoint, it is horrible.

 

I am rather curious how long Apple can keep this kind of thing going and how long Apple users will keep accepting it? Maybe indefinitely I suppose. Time will tell.

 

-kpluck

I agree.

 

 

Interesting design. I probably won't buy one though. I was really looking forward to a new Mac Pro, just this isn't what I wanted. Personally I like the large case of the current design. With this new model, I can see a bunch of non-matching external chassis for hard disks, capture cards, optical media burners, etc, scattered around the desk connected by cables, all of which used to be neatly contained inside the tower.
 
Pros:
Faster
 
Cons:
Not expandable, ugly external accessories required
 
I was hoping for a hybrid server / pro workstation with dual power supplies, multiple fans for redundant protection, more ram slots, rack-able, card slots, Firewire, optical disks and internal HD capability. I don't like the inlet vent on the bottom either. Too easy for it to be obstructed by cables, papers, etc.
 
Oh, and BTW the HTML5 animations on the Apple site promoting the Mac Pro are a perfect example of why HTML5 cannot come close to replacing Flash at least not for quality animation. All kinds of glitches, timing issues and jerky non-buffered animation. If that is the best they can do, it says a lot about the lack of capabilities of the HTML5 platform.

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post #44 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

I'm looking forward to the reviews of this bad-boy when the machine starts shipping. I hope the professional community embraces this system. I think Apple must have done some kind of research into this area before heading off on such a radical redesign.

 

 

Check out this over at Blackmagic Designs:

 

http://forum.blackmagicdesign.com/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=8898

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

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post #45 of 1290

7 teraflops in a cylinder 6" dia x 9" tall. I need to check but I believe this puts it in the supercomputer top 500 list as a single device. It wasn't that long ago it would have led all supercomputers. Of course the old IT gang will say it can't fit into an industry standard 19" rack. Who cares, build a new rack. If I had the skills necessary to design one I would but for those who do, here's my idea. Tilt each MP 15-30 degrees and stack them into the old spice jar rack offsetting each column half a unit to allow more MPs. To get good air flow, you could arrange them around a central core for cabling. Once we hear how much heat these generate, design a large airflow up-draft base to provide cool air. The MP's fan will draw this air across the its central core providing proper cooling. There's no reason we need to have all these computers in an antiquated row of 1U servers. 

 

We will have to wait to hear if Mavericks supports CPU sharing across Thunderbolt 2. I don't believe TB-1 does. If it does, then one rack of 36 MPs could conceivably run at 1/4 petaflop. That's cooking!

post #46 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post


It's a horrible replacement for the Mac Pro tower. Real Pros will hate it.

 

 

That's odd.

 

See my post two above.

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

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Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

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post #47 of 1290
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post
It's a horrible replacement for the Mac Pro tower. Real Pros will hate it.

 

That just proves how worthy it is of the Mac Pro name.

post #48 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzz_ball View Post

Anyone remember the Cube? Hopefully they don't saddle this with a ridiculous price like they did to the cube (RIP). Price for design is not what pros want: they want power. If they premium charge this because of their aesthetic design they are going to see poor sales-through indeed.

 

 

The problem with the Cube was Apple had an entry level Power Mac and mid level iMac that cost less than the Cube. 

post #49 of 1290

If ASUS can make a dual LGA 2011 board, why can't Apple?

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131817

 

And this is why you'd want a dual socket motherboard...

 

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/Intel-Xeon-Ivy-Bridge-EP-Server,21972.html

 

I think we'd all prefer 24 cores over 12....

post #50 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by SchnellFowVay View Post

 

I think everyone in here understands that (or they do now).

 

But I guess the bigger question that I was raising was simply, "what's the point?"

 

I have never heard a professional say the Mac Pro was too large.  What is great about a small cylinder shape that it outweights the annoyance of having a gazillion external drives and cables?

 

Maybe if this thing was a true revolution in performance I might be more inclined to say, "yeah, it's worth it."  But it's going to use standard, off the shelf Haswell processors that can be found on any other workstation computer.  It was like the designers said "hehe, yeah, a small cylinder looks really cool!!"  And then when someone from engineering said, "but most professional users don't really care about the shape of the machine," the designers just said, "well let them add external drives!!!"

 

Again, it's probably going to be a great machine.  It's much easier to see the utility when Apple reduces the size of Macbooks, ipads, etc.  I just don't see what the huge advantage is of making this thing so tiny that it lacks built-in features that many pros need and rely on.

 

A) I think part of what the goal here is to push developers to stop relying on tiny PCI cards. They SHOULD be a dying format. We should have fast breakout boxes with seperate cooling and processing (which can also be turned off when not needed). Spending boku bucks on cards that hide inside your computer is an old idea - one we should be working to dismiss. 

 

B) The design is similar to many super computers, with a large central cooling vent. 

post #51 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

 

 

The problem with the Cube was Apple had an entry level Power Mac and mid level iMac that cost less than the Cube. 

 

But Apple still has an entry level Mac Mini and a mid-level iMac that will cost less than the new Pro.

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post #52 of 1290
Originally Posted by Frank777 View Post
But Apple still has an entry level Mac Mini and a mid-level iMac that will cost less than the new Pro.

 

Neither of those are the Mac Pro. Neither of those compete with this new Mac Pro. If Apple keeps selling the three year old Mac Pro alongside the new one (they won't), that would be a similar situation. They're not going to repeat their mistake.

post #53 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

 

 

The problem with the Cube was Apple had an entry level Power Mac and mid level iMac that cost less than the Cube. 

That is true. The Cube was a cool machine for it's time, and still looks great I think, but it was priced about $200 higher than a Power Mac, which had many more options and features.

post #54 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

If you don't like it, you have the choice not to order it. Personally, I think it looks fantastic and is specced up the yin yang.
.

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post #55 of 1290
The possibilities of this versatile deign are limitless. I'm building a coordinated circular grate to mount on top for keeping my coffee hot, frying pancakes and boiling noodles. Also in development is an ergonomic side-mounted handle so I can use it to dry my hair and remove paint from complex woodwork.
post #56 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

Who says this isn't cheap? Who says this isn't quiet? Why would there be a "Pro mini" when the iMac exists? Why would there be another mini anything when the Mac Mini exists?

You do not get it. Hint:

 

The time is (finally) right for a Mac minitower

http://www.macworld.com/article/2029740/the-time-is-finally-right-for-a-mac-minitower.html

 

BTW, it is an anti-ecological waste to discard a perfectly working display of the iMac just because the un-upgradable CPU is too old (yet the display is as new). And the Mac mini is not powerful enough. And the Mac Pro could be smaller as Mac Pro mini, between the Mac Pro and the Mac mini. That is!

post #57 of 1290
What worries me about this machine.

Storage & upgradability. That's what makes a pro machine. It's Apple, it's a no brainer this is a $5,000 box we are looking at. MAYBE $4,000 but either way it's high end bucks we are looking at. If somehow they pull $3,000 I will be shocked... Either way:
There's no cheap way to expand storage. I have a home built eSATA raid hooked up to my 2008 MacPro that holds 8TB of storage (4x2TB drives) as well as an addition 6TB in 2 additional raids. These are hooked to a eSATA card using port multipliers. All this storage cost me just over $1,200. (Drives, 2 port multipliers, eSATA card and a old DVD Duplicator case I had housing it all.

Housing 4k video takes a lot of space, and buying that space at current thunderbolt prices will add $1-$2,000 more dollars to a price we already know will be high.

My 2008 3.2x8 MacPro that still has lots of life because along with all that storage, I was able to upgrade the GPU. First from the 8800 to a 5870, then a few weeks ago again to a 7950. The graphics cards in the new MacPro are locked in place, so it will become obsolete faster because of this. Instead of buying a high end machine (CPUs) and then upgrading the other parts as needed you are stuck with what you have. As more and more of the Pro App's leverage the GPU for compute horsepower, upgrading the GPU is critical.
YAY It's got PCIe 3.0! Except modern graphics cards don't even staturate PCIe 2.0, and the cards are soldered in place so who cares?

Does PCIe 3 matter on thunderbolt? (actual question here...)

Should add, if the prices for Thunderbolt accessories drop then this machines becomes very attractive. But for the moment I see a MacMini Pro or the next G4 cube.

And yes, working in video, I use DVD's and Blu-Ray every day, but I can live with externals for that.
Smart for Apple, but not for me. I'm a pro user, but that doesn't mean I'm rich.
Edited by CIA - 6/10/13 at 7:11pm
post #58 of 1290
I think there is a big problem with this design. As a video producer and editor, I have 4-5 external hard drives connected at any one time to my laptop. My desk is completely overgrown with power strips, wires, and cables... and the entire physical desk top is taken up with hard drives everywhere. The appeal *to me* of the Mac Pro was all those hard drive bays which would allow me a neat, clean, all-in-one tower with plenty of HDD space inside. This new model will be just as unsightly as a laptop with five devices cabled to it. The new Mac Pro design may look cool in product photos, but it's going to look just as hideous surrounded by a rats nest of cables and wires. This is not going to work for video editors. Fail.
post #59 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I agree.

 

 

Interesting design. I probably won't buy one though. I was really looking forward to a new Mac Pro, just this isn't what I wanted. Personally I like the large case of the current design. With this new model, I can see a bunch of non-matching external chassis for hard disks, capture cards, optical media burners, etc, scattered around the desk connected by cables, all of which used to be neatly contained inside the tower.
 
Pros:
Faster
 
Cons:
Not expandable, ugly external accessories required
 
I was hoping for a hybrid server / pro workstation with dual power supplies, multiple fans for redundant protection, more ram slots, rack-able, card slots, Firewire, optical disks and internal HD capability. I don't like the inlet vent on the bottom either. Too easy for it to be obstructed by cables, papers, etc.
 
Oh, and BTW the HTML5 animations on the Apple site promoting the Mac Pro are a perfect example of why HTML5 cannot come close to replacing Flash at least not for quality animation. All kinds of glitches, timing issues and jerky non-buffered animation. If that is the best they can do, it says a lot about the lack of capabilities of the HTML5 platform.

 

oh man....

post #60 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by v5v View Post


Our existing Pro has a slot into which we can drop an upgraded video card. We never have. We bought the best the machine could support at the time and have never changed it.

Thunderbolt pretty much solves the last of the cases we had for slots. The Blackmagic Design cards we use for HD-SDI I/O are now available in Thunderbolt versions, as is our Pro Tools controller.

I know for a fact that companies like AJA and Blackmagic have been waiting for this Mac Pro. The lack of expansion slots will be taken care of by them and Thunderbolt 2. The solutions may be pricey, but it is the Mac Pro after all.
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post #61 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkevwill View Post

I hope some of the supposed experts replying here, understand the expandability of thunderbolt ports. Including, external PCI enclosures, with any PCI device you want to throw in there.

 

Yes, each enclosure will share the equivalent of a x8 lane.  Meaning if you have a high speed card that wants x8 performance it's on card per external enclosure.

 

Hopefully they stack.

 

If you have a x16 card it'll be throttled.  That's probably not so great.  Perhaps they'll add bonding to the TB2 specs so you can bond two of the ports together for better throughput.

post #62 of 1290

Of course you can rack mount it

 

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post #63 of 1290
I think what Apple did with the Mac Pro mirrors what recently happened with Final Cut Pro X.
Completely new paradigm that had many up in arms.
It took a few updates and some new third party tools to meet the needs of some users.
But at the same time, the new lower pricing made it accessible to many more semi-pro users.
The current Mac Pro starts at $2500.
I believe the new Mac Pro will start at $1800-2000.
post #64 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

 

The article's vague because its author thinks Ethernet is FireWire 800. lol.gif

 

 

This proves that Apple has done 100% the right thing.

 

 

GUESS WHAT THE CYLINDER CAN DO, KIDDO.

 

That's so effing stupid.

 

 

Pros want a lot of cores. Multiple processors are just a means to that end. You'd know that if you actually knew anything.

 

Also? There are no single-chip processors with 12 cores from any manufacturer. Not that I can find, anyway. Not Sandy, Ivy, or Haswell.

 

Yeah, they could have made it a worthless update that didn't actually innovate anything and for which they would have been mocked and derided because it was "late".

 

Instead they punched people like you in the metaphorical face and told you to shut up. This is the future. Deal with it.

 

LOL. That was a bit harsh, but I have to agree. This thing is spec'd at 70 terraflops -- is anyone appreciating and digesting that concept? I think what people don't realize is that the days of slapping in a RAID hard drive, and tweaking the MHZ on a processor are probably gone. Apple is going with some fixed systems and soldered parts because tolerances are too thin to play around with. "Missing hard drive bays" -- it's using a terabyte of Flash RAM. That's enough room to put the OS and a few favorite apps on, right? With the speed of Thunderbolt 2 you can attach all kinds of RAID hard drives on that thing and still have bandwidth -- there is no conventional way his OLD SETUP of adding drives is going to be slowed down by mounting them externally.

 

I mean sure, we all want to tweak hardware and FEEL smart -- but that's for the engineers now. There's likely nothing you can do to speed this system up without affecting RAM timing or adding heat to a very efficient design. I don't REALLY know how perfected the design is -- but I'm just breezing of the specs and drooling. I haven't heard of a system that was so designed for speed outside of a lab.

 

I'm just thinking of all the real-time 3D rendering and user interaction on 4K screens you could do with this baby.
post #65 of 1290

Looking through the preview pages at apple.com, two things really stand out for me:

1. The cooling: I love the idea that there is a central heatsink/column that everything is attached to, and a single fan.

2. The storage speed. I have the latest SSD on my PC which does 500MB/s read, 450MB/s write, they are claiming 1250MB/s for this box.

 

I think when people get to try this out it's going to feel like the fastest box they've ever used.

post #66 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plumperton1 View Post

I think there is a big problem with this design. As a video producer and editor, I have 4-5 external hard drives connected at any one time to my laptop. My desk is completely overgrown with power strips, wires, and cables... and the entire physical desk top is taken up with hard drives everywhere. The appeal *to me* of the Mac Pro was all those hard drive bays which would allow me a neat, clean, all-in-one tower with plenty of HDD space inside. This new model will be just as unsightly as a laptop with five devices cabled to it. The new Mac Pro design may look cool in product photos, but it's going to look just as hideous surrounded by a rats nest of cables and wires. This is not going to work for video editors. Fail.

 

Hopefully someone will build a matching black base for the Mac Pro to sit on (and get cool air) and provide an octopus cable to the TB2 ports.  Each slot in the chassis gets it's own TB2 port and you get a built in 4-6 bay RAID array.

 

Then the Cray fans will really have a nano Cray 1 sitting on their desk.

 

 

 

You can arrange the slots radially with the backs ending up in the donut hole so you can route any cables out the back.

post #67 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

The more I read about this new Mac Pro, the more I'm liking it.

 

That is my reaction. I was chilly to the concept when I first heard about it, but the walk through made it clearer what it was: a small but powerful processor module with fast local storage for the system and fast ports for connecting to bulk storage. The cooling setup is great. The bet Apple is making is by the time you need to upgrade the two GPU modules, you will want to upgrade the CPU and memory as well.

 

On top of all that, it looks nice once you see it in regular light. Some photos look like black shiny plastic when it really is reflective metal. They need to take better shots.

 

The cost will be killer though. 5K to start, up to 10K/15K USD depending on setup? Way outside what I can afford, but some forward thinking professionals should be able to appreciate it.

post #68 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plumperton1 View Post

I think there is a big problem with this design. As a video producer and editor, I have 4-5 external hard drives connected at any one time to my laptop. My desk is completely overgrown with power strips, wires, and cables... and the entire physical desk top is taken up with hard drives everywhere. The appeal *to me* of the Mac Pro was all those hard drive bays which would allow me a neat, clean, all-in-one tower with plenty of HDD space inside. This new model will be just as unsightly as a laptop with five devices cabled to it. The new Mac Pro design may look cool in product photos, but it's going to look just as hideous surrounded by a rats nest of cables and wires. This is not going to work for video editors. Fail.

 

I'm not really sure what your problem is here. Why can't you just get a 6 bay SATA enclosure and hook it to USB 3.0 for about $250? You already have a hodgepodge of drives on your current system -- so this would be no different unless you invest in some way to deal with your drives. It's a tiny hassle but not a deal breaker if you consider the specs on this machine and a terabyte of SSD.

 

it might be NICE to stick them all in the Computer Box - but I think I get what Apple is trying to do here; they want the Central Processing Unit to be a "known entity" and as fast and reliable as possible. All the devices you add are peripheral.

 

If you want FASTER than USB 3 - then you go with Thunderbolt -- it's a bit of an investment right now but that is PRO LEVEL. USB 3 covers everything under the pro level and it's cheap. Not trying to be an apologist here but Apple is creating this as a dream machine for pros -- so they don't want to play with people who aren't using Thunderbolt.

 

Take the money you will save from not having to buy accelerator cards and a super computer - and just get a big drive bay. I've gotten away from external drives and just use the bare drives and plug them in. It's cheaper and easier to manage large projects.
post #69 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Mozzarella View Post

The current Mac Pro starts at $2500.
I believe the new Mac Pro will start at $1800-2000.

 

If it starts at $1800 it should do really well if it comes with a half decent GPU.  Doesn't have to be awesome but half decent.  Say a GTX 775M or equivalent with 2GB RAM.  Something that 3 years from now will perform okay with the latest pro app since you can't upgrade it.

 

If it does start at $1800 then the iMac 27" will take a huge hit in numbers.  I wouldn't be surprised if the starting price will be $3K.

 

Two 6 core Xeon

4x4GB RAM for 16GB

512GB SSD

Single GPU

 

That's a $800 price drop from the current 12 Core Mac Pro and a great value.   The starting price went up $500 though.

 

If there is a Quad model I don't see it costing less than $2K.  It would crater the iMac sales too much and the margins on the screen are too sweet to pass up.

post #70 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Clueless troll 2010,2011,2012 - Where is the new Mac Pro? The Mac Pro is getting kind of stale! Apple needs to update the design! Has Apple discontinued and abandoned the Mac Pro line?

 

Clueless troll 2013 - WTF! Where is the old Mac Pro?! I don't see any SCSI connection and where is the CD slot? There is just too much innovation going on here for my feeble mind to comprehend. 

That's not fair.

 

It's not being a troll wanting, asking and even demanding a new Mac Pro when Apple didn't update the product for so long. Some of the Mac Pro users are more loyal and knowledgeable, not to mention long time customers of Apple. 

 

People are allowed to act and react emotionally without being called names, especially when they are not espousing their opinions with the express purpose of being inflammatory and baiting others, which you seem to doing. Who is really being more of a troll? 

 

Really uncalled for.

post #71 of 1290

There doesn't seem to be anything stopping upgrading of RAM or for that matter the HDD. They aren't soldered on at all but are in reasonably standard slots from what I can see.

 

The only thing that might put a spanner in the works is how easy is it to get into the case? It does look pretty easy but it remains to be seen.

post #72 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by nonstopdesign View Post

oh man....

There has never been a better time for Adobe to release Creative Suite for Linux. Personally I like big cases and motherboards that I can build to suit my needs. Hackintosh is probably not an option going forward, but neither is this new Mac Pro in my opinion. 4K video and thunderbolt are not exclusive to Apple. Premier is already 4K capable. TB2 will also be available on other boards around the same time.

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post #73 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by pedromartins View Post

This is just such a futuristic marvel that has the potential to change the way Pros work.

 

Of course, most of them are retarded and unable to evolve, it's a shame they will be left behind. Same thing with keyboards and mouses, diskette and cd rom, you name it.

 

I disagree about the pros disagreeing. 1smile.gif

 

This machine is exactly what a real pro wants.  The people complaining are those dilettantes that think they are "pros" but aren't really, and just want a super hot machine to brag about.  

Basically most of the folks that post at AppleInsider (including me).

post #74 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by nht View Post

 

If it starts at $1800 it should do really well if it comes with a half decent GPU.  Doesn't have to be awesome but half decent.  Say a GTX 775M or equivalent with 2GB RAM.  Something that 3 years from now will perform okay with the latest pro app since you can't upgrade it.

Two ATI FirePro 6GB video cards capable of running 3 screens at 4096 resolution be okay for you? That's 12GBs of video RAM there and you want to ditch it for a 4GB video card?

 

Still won't run MechWarrior Online though because some numpty decided that it will only work on NVidia cards. Who does that these days? Idiots that's who.

 

Edit: Possibly maybe this:

 

http://www.amd.com/US/PRODUCTS/WORKSTATION/GRAPHICS/ATI-FIREPRO-3D/W9000/Pages/w9000.aspx

post #75 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by nonstopdesign View Post

oh man....

There has never been a better time for Adobe to release Creative Suite for Linux. Personally I like big cases and motherboards that I can build to suit my needs. Hackintosh is probably not an option going forward, but neither is this new Mac Pro in my opinion. 4K video and thunderbolt are not exclusive to Apple. Premier is already 4K capable. TB2 will also be available on other boards around the same time.

Problem is; your concept of "building to suit" is from a past era. That's ok. It has always been this way with "Pros" and Apple. Probably always will be.

post #76 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by JollyPaul View Post

That is my reaction. I was chilly to the concept when I first heard about it, but the walk through made it clearer what it was: a small but powerful processor module with fast local storage for the system and fast ports for connecting to bulk storage. The cooling setup is great. The bet Apple is making is by the time you need to upgrade the two GPU modules, you will want to upgrade the CPU and memory as well.

 

On top of all that, it looks nice once you see it in regular light. Some photos look like black shiny plastic when it really is reflective metal. They need to take better shots.

 

The cost will be killer though. 5K to start, up to 10K/15K USD depending on setup? Way outside what I can afford, but some forward thinking professionals should be able to appreciate it.

 

If it's 5K to start it's going to be another Cube.  I'm guessing $3K for the base model which will be 12 core.

 

It's a great machine if you wanted to buy a Mac Mini Pro.  I was hoping that the Mac Mini Pro was going to actually BE a mini upgraded to pro levels but this will work for me.  Pricier than I'd prefer but Apple's always pricey.

 

Shame for the folks looking for an actual Mac Pro though.

 

The folks here dissing them for being old fashioned simply don't get it.  Stuff they need is stuff they need.  A TB single card full length enclosure is $800 and doesn't run as fast.  A 4 bay TB RAID is $1K.  That's around $2600 of extra expense over the old Mac Pro if you have two processing cards and need local storage.  A thousand here and a thousand there multiplied by a few dozen machines and you're talking a noticeable cost delta.

 

We have SANs and that's a huge performance hit because they're just on our regular GigE infrastructure because our office complex is very large.

post #77 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by rob53 View Post

7 teraflops in a cylinder 6" dia x 9" tall. I need to check but I believe this puts it in the supercomputer top 500 list as a single device. It wasn't that long ago it would have led all supercomputers. Of course the old IT gang will say it can't fit into an industry standard 19" rack. Who cares, build a new rack. If I had the skills necessary to design one I would but for those who do, here's my idea. Tilt each MP 15-30 degrees and stack them into the old spice jar rack offsetting each column half a unit to allow more MPs. To get good air flow, you could arrange them around a central core for cabling. Once we hear how much heat these generate, design a large airflow up-draft base to provide cool air. The MP's fan will draw this air across the its central core providing proper cooling. There's no reason we need to have all these computers in an antiquated row of 1U servers. 

 

We will have to wait to hear if Mavericks supports CPU sharing across Thunderbolt 2. I don't believe TB-1 does. If it does, then one rack of 36 MPs could conceivably run at 1/4 petaflop. That's cooking!

Not sure what you mean "as a single device." But it has been a few years since 7 teraflops would make it on the top 500 list of supercomputing.

 

As for building a true supercomputing cluster, it seems the Mac Mini remains the more convenient choice. But I could be proven wrong.

post #78 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppeX View Post

Apple should make a Mac Pro mini. Quiet and cheaper.

 

Says the commenter who cannot possibly have any idea how quiet, or how cheap, the new Mac Pro is, or is not …  

 

… since the price hasn't been announced yet and no one has even seen one running yet. 

post #79 of 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryn Lowe View Post

There doesn't seem to be anything stopping upgrading of RAM or for that matter the HDD. They aren't soldered on at all but are in reasonably standard slots from what I can see.

 

The problem with the RAM is it dropped from 8 slots to 4 slots.

 

The SSD probably isn't a standard format as the industry hasn't really settled on one.  Even within Apple machines there are SSB blade differences.

post #80 of 1290

I'm not a pro user, so take that into account. 

 

I see this as a very useful design. I see this like website design where you separate the content from the style. The Mac Pro separates the computations from the content. I would presume that most design houses will have large disk arrays, even in smaller shops, rather than large data storage at each desk. (just assuming) The new Mac Pro easily allows you to hook up what seems like very high computational power to your existing data storage. When your rig is outdated the IT department, or now yourself, simply places a new Mac Pro on your desk, quick transfer of applications and you are back to work. 

 

Again, I am not a pro user, but this seems to be a lot simpler with a lot less IT involvement. If you need more storage, you upgrade your NAS, if you need more computational power, you update your Mac Pro.  

 

Can you daisy-chaine two of these Mac Pros for more computational power? 

 

I'm sure someone will design a blue-ray burner that is round and will stack under the Mac Pro. Or did I just do that? :) 

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