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Apple agrees to pay $32.5M in refunds, settling App Store in-app purchase lawsuit with US government

post #1 of 101
Thread Starter 
Apple and the U.S. Federal Trade Commission announced on Wednesday that the two sides have reached a $32.5 million settlement, bringing to an end a lawsuit over the ease with which children could rack up costly bills through in-app purchases on the iOS App Store.



The FTC has agreed to drop its lawsuit against Apple in exchange for the company paying $32.5 million in refunds to consumers who were affected by the in-app purchase issues. Prior to the FTC's announcement a letter sent by Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook to company employees leaked to various media outlets, including CNBC, in which he criticized the FTC's pursuit, saying the case "smacked of double jeopardy."

However, Cook also said that the new consent decree that was proposed by the FTC does not require the company to do anything they weren't already planning in an effort to resolve the lawsuit. As a result, Cook said Apple would accept the proposal to avoid a "long and distracting legal fight."Apple will refund $32.5 million to customers whose children made unauthorized in-app purchases, and in return the FTC will drop its lawsuit.

Of course, a $32.5 million payout to customers is pocket change for Apple, a company that had a massive $148.6 billion in cash as of the end of last quarter.

The FTC first announced in early 2011 that it would investigate iTunes in-app purchases after receiving complaints from consumers. In particular, games geared toward children were scrutinized, as parents found that their kids were making unwanted purchases in various titles for iPhone and iPad.

In one high-profile incident, an 8-year-old racked up more than $6,000 in in-app purchases through iOS games. Apple ended up refunding the money to the parents of that child, who was playing games sucha s Smurfs' Village, Hay Day, My Horse and Campus Life.

For its part, the FTC teased Wednesday morning that it would announce a settlement with a "major technology company." Apple preempted the formal announcement, however, with the leaked e-mail from Cook.
post #2 of 101
Mr. Cook's letter in it's entirety as follows:

Team,
I want to let you know that Apple has entered into a consent decree with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission. We have been negotiating with the FTC for several months over disclosures about the in-app purchase feature of the App Store, because younger customers have sometimes been able to make purchases without their parents’ consent. I know this announcement will come as a surprise to many of you since Apple has led the industry by making the App Store a safe place for customers of all ages.

From the very beginning, protecting children has been a top priority for the App Store team and everyone at Apple. The store is thoughtfully curated, and we hold app developers to Apple’s own high standards of security, privacy, usefulness and decency, among others. The parental controls in iOS are strong, intuitive and customizable, and we’ve continued to add ways for parents to protect their children. These controls go far beyond the features of other mobile device and OS makers, most of whom don’t even review the apps they sell to children.

When we introduced in-app purchases in 2009, we proactively offered parents a way to disable the function with a single switch. When in-app purchases were enabled and a password was entered to download an app, the App Store allowed purchases for 15 minutes without requiring a password. The 15-minute window had been there since the launch of the App Store in 2008 and was aimed at making the App Store easy to use, but some younger customers discovered that it also allowed them to make in-app purchases without a parent’s approval.

We heard from some customers with children that it was too easy to make in-app purchases, so we moved quickly to make improvements. We even created additional steps in the purchasing process, because these steps are so helpful to parents.

Last year, we set out to refund any in-app purchase which may have been made without a parent’s permission. We wanted to reach every customer who might have been affected, so we sent emails to 28 million App Store customers – anyone who had made an in-app purchase in a game designed for kids. When some emails bounced, we mailed the parents postcards. In all, we received 37,000 claims and we will be reimbursing each one as promised.

A federal judge agreed with our actions as a full settlement and we felt we had made things right for everyone. Then, the FTC got involved and we faced the prospect of a second lawsuit over the very same issue.

It doesn’t feel right for the FTC to sue over a case that had already been settled. To us, it smacked of double jeopardy. However, the consent decree the FTC proposed does not require us to do anything we weren’t already going to do, so we decided to accept it rather than take on a long and distracting legal fight.

The App Store is one of Apple’s most important innovations, and it’s wildly popular with our customers around the world because they know they can trust Apple. You and your coworkers have helped Apple earn that trust, which we value and respect above all else.

Apple is a company full of disruptive ideas and innovative people, who are also committed to upholding the highest moral, legal and ethical standards in everything we do. As I’ve said before, we believe technology can serve humankind’s deepest values and highest aspirations. As Apple continues to grow, there will inevitably be scrutiny and criticism along our journey. We don’t shy away from these kinds of questions, because we are confident in the integrity of our company and our coworkers.

Thank you for the hard work you do to delight our customers, and for showing them at every turn that Apple is worthy of their trust.

Tim
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post #3 of 101
Wow, an 8 year old racked up a bill for 6000 dollars!!

How many games would that have bought me when I was 8 and was playing Atari 2600 console?

Must be ridiculous amounts some of these developers are getting paid (mostly by advertisers I assume).
post #4 of 101
All this said, in cases where the purchases were over a long period of time and where NOT within a few minutes downloading a new app! I say the parents are to blame. Pretty good sign that they told the kids the password. So let them hang.

And I still say, or a variety of reasons, there should be managed Apple ID accounts so kids can have their own account and password for iCloud etc. And regardless of the device, the restrictions are there on the account level. They could run from the age allowed, turning off IAP. Limiting money spent in a time period even if gift cards/allowances are used and so on. WITHOUT needing a school involved, just a parent's Apple ID to manage it.

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post #5 of 101

Apple will have to go through their corporate couch cushions looking for the spare change to cover this.

post #6 of 101
Default prompt to re-enter the pw is set to 15 minutes; they should change that. Other than that, it's the parents fault for not configuring your device before handing it over to your 8 year old.

Also, 'doubling-down on security'. How's that going?
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post #7 of 101
So when does Google have to pay up for the same thing in the Google app store? Or, like the Chinese labor flaps, only Apple does this and gets sued?
post #8 of 101

Unless there's something that Apple isn't revealing, I don't understand why the FTC got involved.   Seems to me that Apple was already doing the right thing and the court agreed.   

 

I'm not an Apple fanboy and I criticize Apple when I believe they're in the wrong, but how many other companies would have contacted everyone by email (instead of waiting for customer service complaints) who had made a purchase and then, when emails bounced back, notified people with postcards?

 

Something "stinks" about the kid who ordered $thousands of dollars of in-app purchases.    The kid would of had to of made those purchases within 15 minutes AND with a password.   Hell...the app store makes you enter a password even for free applications (which drives me nuts).     So how did the kid make all those purchases without the parent knowing (and obviously without the parent properly setting up the device).      

post #9 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

So when does Google have to pay up for the same thing in the Google app store?

Haven't you heard? Google closed the open source thingy; Android is completely secure now.
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post #10 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post
 

Unless there's something that Apple isn't revealing, I don't understand why the FTC got involved.   Seems to me that Apple was already doing the right thing and the court agreed.   

 

I'm not an Apple fanboy and I criticize Apple when I believe they're in the wrong, but how many other companies would have contacted everyone by email (instead of waiting for customer service complaints) who had made a purchase and then, when emails bounced back, notified people with postcards?

 

Something "stinks" about the kid who ordered $thousands of dollars of in-app purchases.    The kid would of had to of made those purchases within 15 minutes AND with a password.   Hell...the app store makes you enter a password even for free applications (which drives me nuts).     So how did the kid make all those purchases without the parent knowing (and obviously without the parent properly setting up the device).      

 This fix was put in after it was found out parents failed to be a parent and watch over what their kids were doing with their phone. I suspect these same parent tried sueing apple when the kid deleted all their personal information and contact from the phone since apple did not prevent the kid from doing this without putting in a password.

 

Yeah not to rehash the whole who's responsibility argument, but if your kid manages to rack up $6000 in fees than it is your own dumb fault, it is no different than you kids breaking someone window with a baseball and trying to claim the window should not have broken in the first place.

 

It is the cost of having kids, they do things like this if you not diligent about watching them or at least teaching them what is right and wrong.


Edited by Maestro64 - 1/15/14 at 10:26am
post #11 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

So when does Google have to pay up for the same thing in the Google app store? Or, like the Chinese labor flaps, only Apple does this and gets sued?

GooglePlay never offered a 15 minute open window for purchases AFAIK,. In addition I believe they offer much more control for parents wanting to restrict their children's purchases and downloads than Apple currently does. Parents can even set up specific accounts for their children with age-appropriate content restrictions and blocking of in-app purchases. That prevents those young users from even seeing what apps or content the parent has.

With that out of the way I remember a story about the FTC investiging potential privacy issues in apps targeting children, and yes that included Google Play.

EDIT: Thanks Maestro for remembering the 15 minute purchase window was Apple's initial response to the already problematic in-app purchases appearing in games targeting children.
Edited by Gatorguy - 1/15/14 at 9:44am
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post #12 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


GooglePlay never offered a 15 minute open window for purchases AFAIK. In addition I believe they offer much more control for parents wanting to restrict their children's purchases and downloads than Apple currently does. Parents can even set up specific accounts for their children with age-appropriate content restrictions and blocking of in-app purchases. That prevents those young users from even seeing what apps or content the parent has.

 

Yup, if Apple would allow separate user accounts on the iPod touch/iPad, this wouldn't even be an issue. You'd have the primary account for the parents, and the secondary (you're ass isn't buying anything account) for the kids. Why they haven't done this yet is puzzling to me.

post #13 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

So when does Google have to pay up for the same thing in the Google app store? Or, like the Chinese labor flaps, only Apple does this and gets sued?

Androiders don't pay for things.

Dear parents, an idevice isn't a baby sitter.
post #14 of 101

Xbox Live apparently allows for “indie games”, as they call them, to be put on their store for download, provided that a demo is available. These games are of worthless to fair quality and are basically the equivalent to any sort of “app store” in this ecosystem. If anyone has ever seen a video of demos of such games being played, you’ll remember seeing the incredibly evil ways the game creators have shoehorned in-game purchases into them.

 

For example, if the game is meant to be played by rapidly pressing the ‘A’ button, at the end of a level in the demo the creator will often throw up an option to purchase the full game… by pressing the ‘A’ button.

 

Microsoft has given no guidelines as to the creation or quality of these games, and thus they are filled with deceptive and underhanded attempts to divorce people from their money.

 

Apple, on the other hand, has some of the strictest rules for in-app purchases of any ecosystem.

 

In the case of Xbox Live indie games, the fault lies with Microsoft and the software creators. In the case of iOS in-app purchases, the fault lies, most generally, with the user. But in an age of no personal responsibility, Apple is to “blame”.

 

You can’t force people to educate themselves. You can absolve yourself of responsibility for their actions, however, and Apple has already done just that.

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post #15 of 101
Apple has always sent an email notification of purchases a day or two after. Why didn't the parents catch on? I think any parent who doesn't track their kid's activities should be liable because they're stupid "here you go son, here is my password, have fun duh." I get notified for each and every download even for free apps. If the email provided bounces, why is that the vendor's fault? Even after a post card was sent. This administration and it's various arms is turning this country into a communist society. DOJ, FTC, activist jurists, FCC, etall.
post #16 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

For example, if the game is meant to be played by rapidly pressing the ‘A’ button, at the end of a level in the demo the creator will often throw up an option to purchase the full game… by pressing the ‘A’ button.

It's not that easy. Pressing 'A' would only initiate the process of purchasing the full game. A menu comes up where the purchase needs to be confirmed, and can be password protected.
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post #17 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

So when does Google have to pay up for the same thing in the Google app store? Or, like the Chinese labor flaps, only Apple does this and gets sued?

How could Google have the same problem if all the games are laggy and buggy? Kids get frustrated and quit before they ever get a chance to make a IAP.
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post #18 of 101

I'm glad to see apple making a responsible choice.  Taking care of it's customers is the reason that so many have become die hard fans for life.  

post #19 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mazda 3s View Post
 

 

Yup, if Apple would allow separate user accounts on the iPod touch/iPad, this wouldn't even be an issue. You'd have the primary account for the parents, and the secondary (you're ass isn't buying anything account) for the kids. Why they haven't done this yet is puzzling to me.

 Again kids should not have accounts of their own again be a parent it not like you give a kid a Credit Card and say go have fun. Until my kids can pay their own bills they only get what I buy for them or let them use. I have multiply iOS devices and one account and all apps are loaded onto the device, i never gave my kids free access to my accounts and never allow them free access to the itunes/app store. But then I never had $6000 bill.

 

The only reason google gives kids an account is so they can track their habit from day one, do not think they did it to be good to kids. Google wanted the ability to separate ever person in your house from a analytics stand point. Keep in mind in most every state in the US kids are not allow to buy things especially when a contract is involved and since itunes requires an agreement between you and them (a contract) and requires a CC (another contract) they could not give kids an account even though things are free there or you could use a gift card to buy.

post #20 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

Xbox Live apparently allows for “indie games”, as they call them, to be put on their store for download, provided that a demo is available. These games are of worthless to fair quality and are basically the equivalent to any sort of “app store” in this ecosystem. If anyone has ever seen a video of demos of such games being played, you’ll remember seeing the incredibly evil ways the game creators have shoehorned in-game purchases into them.

 

For example, if the game is meant to be played by rapidly pressing the ‘A’ button, at the end of a level in the demo the creator will often throw up an option to purchase the full game… by pressing the ‘A’ button.

 

Microsoft has given no guidelines as to the creation or quality of these games, and thus they are filled with deceptive and underhanded attempts to divorce people from their money.

 

Apple, on the other hand, has some of the strictest rules for in-app purchases of any ecosystem.

 

In the case of Xbox Live indie games, the fault lies with Microsoft and the software creators. In the case of iOS in-app purchases, the fault lies, most generally, with the user. But in an age of no personal responsibility, Apple is to “blame”.

 

You can’t force people to educate themselves. You can absolve yourself of responsibility for their actions, however, and Apple has already done just that.

That is the exact problem, the FTC has forced Apple's hand (wonder what is real back story) they have now reinforce the idea that people do not need to be responsible for their actions.

post #21 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

Androiders don't pay for things.

Dear parents, an idevice isn't a baby sitter.

Google has more CC numbers on file than Apple does. Of course, people willingly gave their CC info over to Apple¡ 1tongue.gif
Edited by SolipsismX - 1/15/14 at 7:47pm

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post #22 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

Unless there's something that Apple isn't revealing, I don't understand why the FTC got involved.  

To make a name for themselves and look like they were doing something about this HUGE issue.

Truth is, Apple basically gave refunds to anyone that asked. One time. If you were dumb enough not to follow their suggestions about parental controls etc that was on you.

Quote:

Something "stinks" about the kid who ordered $thousands of dollars of in-app purchases.    The kid would of had to of made those purchases within 15 minutes AND with a password.   Hell...the app store makes you enter a password even for free applications (which drives me nuts).     So how did the kid make all those purchases without the parent knowing (and obviously without the parent properly setting up the device).      

Parents not paying attention. Not looking at what kid was downloading other than it was free. Telling kids password. Not setting up restrictions. And so on

My fav was the guy in the UK who out his credit card on his sons account/told kid password on account. Then didn't pay attention to credit card statements coming in because he had paid off account. Until he got a collection call for not paying his bill for three to four months. He demanded a refund but Apple refused because they were dozens of small charges over an extended period. So not an accident. He reported his tween age kid for credit card fraud.

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post #23 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post
 

Again kids should not have accounts of their own again be a parent it not like you give a kid a Credit Card and say go have fun. Until my kids can pay their own bills they only get what I buy for them or let them use. I have multiply iOS devices and one account and all apps are loaded onto the device, i never gave my kids free access to my accounts and never allow them free access to the itunes/app store. But then I never had $6000 bill.

 

The only reason google gives kids an account is so they can track their habit from day one, do not think they did it to be good to kids. Google wanted the ability to separate ever person in your house from a analytics stand point. Keep in mind in most every state in the US kids are not allow to buy things especially when a contract is involved and since itunes requires an agreement between you and them (a contract) and requires a CC (another contract) they could not give kids an account even though things are free there or you could use a gift card to buy.

 

Kids need a separate account because I'm not going to buy another $600 iPad Air for JUST my son to use. He uses my iPad Air about as much as I do -- we share it. I'd like to have my primary account which has all of my applications on it, all of my preferences. I'd then have a secondary, LIMITED account for my son so that he can play his games or use educational apps and not screw around with my settings (my kid is always moving my app icons around).

 

Just like I can have multiple accounts on my MacBook, I'd like them on my iPad as well.

post #24 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mazda 3s View Post
 

 

Yup, if Apple would allow separate user accounts on the iPod touch/iPad, this wouldn't even be an issue. You'd have the primary account for the parents, and the secondary (you're ass isn't buying anything account) for the kids. Why they haven't done this yet is puzzling to me.

 

Why parents hand their infants a $600 phone is puzzling to me. There are some real winners out there.

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post #25 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mazda 3s View Post
 

 

Kids need a separate account because I'm not going to buy another $600 iPad Air for JUST my son to use. He uses my iPad Air about as much as I do -- we share it. I'd like to have my primary account which has all of my applications on it, all of my preferences. I'd then have a secondary, LIMITED account for my son so that he can play his games or use educational apps and not screw around with my settings (my kid is always moving my app icons around).

 

Just like I can have multiple accounts on my MacBook, I'd like them on my iPad as well.

 

Buy your kid a set of LEGOs. Problem solved.

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post #26 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post
 

That is the exact problem, the FTC has forced Apple's hand (wonder what is real back story) they have now reinforce the idea that people do not need to be responsible for their actions.

 

Actually, there has been a two-pronged effect. Idiot parents are still irresponsible AND the government can blackmail companies at will.

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post #27 of 101
It amazes me how some of you are so confused by this.
The in app purchase gimmick is rampent and sick. The app maker make a watered down product and then ask you to add on to it, at a price, to make it the way it should have been at time of download.
FREE ain't always FREE.
Angry Birds is one game in particular that does this sh**. You notice that as you progress through AB the physics changes.HMMM. At 45 degrees I should get max distance all the time , huh. Yeah right. You try and try to topple the blocks but to no avail. Then, VIOLA!!!! Angry Birds offers you, at a price, add-ons that can greatly improve your ability to knock sh** down.
NOOOOOO WAAAAAAAAAAAY!
post #28 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by maccherry View Post

It amazes me how some of you are so confused by this.
The in app purchase gimmick is rampent and sick. The app maker make a watered down product and then ask you to add on to it, at a price, to make it the way it should have been at time of download.
FREE ain't always FREE.
Angry Birds is one game in particular that does this sh**. You notice that as you progress through AB the physics changes.HMMM. At 45 degrees I should get max distance all the time , huh. Yeah right. You try and try to topple the blocks but to no avail. Then, VIOLA!!!! Angry Birds offers you, at a price, add-ons that can greatly improve your ability to knock sh** down.
NOOOOOO WAAAAAAAAAAAY!

It certainly gets abused but in no way would I define the entirety of in-app purchases a gimmick.

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post #29 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by maccherry View Post

It amazes me how some of you are so confused by this.
The in app purchase gimmick is rampent and sick. The app maker make a watered down product and then ask you to add on to it, at a price, to make it the way it should have been at time of download.
FREE ain't always FREE.
Angry Birds is one game in particular that does this sh**. You notice that as you progress through AB the physics changes.HMMM. At 45 degrees I should get max distance all the time , huh. Yeah right. You try and try to topple the blocks but to no avail. Then, VIOLA!!!! Angry Birds offers you, at a price, add-ons that can greatly improve your ability to knock sh** down.
NOOOOOO WAAAAAAAAAAAY!

Looks like the birds aren't the only ones that are angry. 1smile.gif

I have never made an in-app purchase and I play candy crush!
post #30 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

It certainly gets abused but in no way would I define the entirety of in-app purchases a gimmick.

But it certainly has gotten perverted for its intended purpose. I used to laud Rovio for not partaking in the money grab but they've also turned to IAPs. I took my so off a iPod Touch and got him a PS Vita, I'd much rather pay $20 for a full game than $. 99 plus a multitude of IAPs that ultimately can cost way more than $20.
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post #31 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

But it certainly has gotten perverted for its intended purpose. I used to laud Rovio for not partaking in the money grab but they've also turned to IAPs. I took my so off a iPod Touch and got him a PS Vita, I'd much rather pay $20 for a full game than $. 99 plus a multitude of IAPs that ultimately can cost way more than $20.

People complain enough about Apple's App Store curation time and their rules. Will people be happy if they start to say "We think that's abusive use of the in-app system"?

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post #32 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

People complain enough about Apple's App Store curation time and their rules. Will people be happy if they start to say "We think that's abusive use of the in-app system"?

People will always complain, but I've always subscribed to a ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Many devs prey on unsuspecting users and unfortunately the onus falls on Apple. There might not be spyware nor malware in the walled garden but some snakes have snuck in.
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post #33 of 101
My grandchildren have their own Apple ID's but there is no credit card associated with the accounts. If they get iTunes Gift cards then they have money. If they want money in their account, they come to me with cash and I transfer the amount to them. They learn about not being able to purchase something they want when they do not have the money.
post #34 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2old4fun View Post

My grandchildren have their own Apple ID's but there is no credit card associated with the accounts. If they get iTunes Gift cards then they have money. If they want money in their account, they come to me with cash and I transfer the amount to them. They learn about not being able to purchase something they want when they do not have the money.

You should change your user name to 2smartn2old4fun. lol.gif
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post #35 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mazda 3s View Post
 

 

Kids need a separate account because I'm not going to buy another $600 iPad Air for JUST my son to use. He uses my iPad Air about as much as I do -- we share it. I'd like to have my primary account which has all of my applications on it, all of my preferences. I'd then have a secondary, LIMITED account for my son so that he can play his games or use educational apps and not screw around with my settings (my kid is always moving my app icons around).

 

Just like I can have multiple accounts on my MacBook, I'd like them on my iPad as well.

Actually it sounds like you need what is on the Mac which is multiply user logins to the ipad so each user can have their on user environment. 

 

Again kids do not need an itune/app store purchasing account nor does apple/google need to know who they are or track their user habits.

 

I know I am kind of the odd man out in this regards but more an more people tend to agree with me, kids should not and do not need an internet present when they are still under your roof and your responsible with everything they do. I am not sure why people think it is okay for their kids to be known by the world as well as have responsibilities that most adults fail at like making purchases and paying their bills.

post #36 of 101

it seems that parents these days have been released of all responsibility for supervising their kids.and on top it, they get paid for being ignorant.

 

So, will those that get reimbursed for unauthorized app purchases delete those apps they didn't give their kids permission to buy? I highly doubt it.

 

A​s a result, Apple will probably require us to sign-in with every single app purchase in the future so as to avoid the litigious behavior of those that find it easier to sue than to set and enforce ground rules with their children. Guaranteed, those same parents will be the first ones to complain that they have to input their password with every purchase made.

post #37 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post
 

Actually it sounds like you need what is on the Mac which is multiply user logins to the ipad so each user can have their on user environment. 

 

 

That's EXACTLY what I'm talking about. "Account" was probably the wrong word to use. A different environment/login for each person. Full access for me, limited functionality for my son with no purchasing ability whatsoever.

post #38 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post
 

 

Why parents hand their infants a $600 phone is puzzling to me. There are some real winners out there.

 

Infants? What are you talking about? My son definitely isn't an infant.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post
 

 

Buy your kid a set of LEGOs. Problem solved.

 

**Facepalm** Divert, DIVERT!

post #39 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mazda 3s View Post
 

 

Infants? What are you talking about? My son definitely isn't an infant.

 

Is your son racking up $6,000 bills for in-app purchases?

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #40 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Is your son racking up $6,000 bills for in-app purchases?

Infants probably not either, but can cause several hundred dollars worth of damage with their drooling. lol.gif
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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