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Apple releases Apple TV "Take 2" software update - Page 4

post #121 of 180
My parents love the screen saver. They leave it playing in the background - so that the pictures float up the screen.

Does this screen saver still exist in the new AppleTV?
If it doesn't, it'd be enough for them to not upgrade.....
post #122 of 180
My apple tv is at version 1.1 but when I click to update is says it is up to date. It doesnt seem to find the version 2.0 update. I am living outside the US but have a US Itunes account running.

Any ideas on how to get the take 2 update?
post #123 of 180
Anyone know if you rent a movie over itunes (SD), will a rentals tab pop up on your appletv so you can stream it to your TV if you wanted to? Or does it only reside on your computer/iphone/ipod. There are cases where I would start a movie on my iphone, but would like to finish it on the big screen?
post #124 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatsFan83 View Post

Anyone know if you rent a movie over itunes (SD), will a rentals tab pop up on your appletv so you can stream it to your TV if you wanted to? Or does it only reside on your computer/iphone/ipod. There are cases where I would start a movie on my iphone, but would like to finish it on the big screen?

If it works like the moving it to the iPod/iPhone, you have to manual push i to the AppleTV from within iTunes. It can now only be played on the AppleTV until you again use iTunes to pull it off the AppleTV.

In contrast, any SD or HD renals that are made via the AppleTV interface will only reside and play on AppleTV. These can't be transfered.
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post #125 of 180
Hi. Does anyone know how to disengage the Apple remote from a computer? Every time I use the remote for ATV it's affects my iMac as well even though it's behind me! Do I need to completely shut off front row? If so how do I do that? I would prefer to just shut the remote off- very annoying.
post #126 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by neuby View Post

The Apple really needs bluetooth keyboard support, or let us use my iphone as a keyboard, for you tube and searching movie titles or songs it's easier to type there keyboard layout sucks on the apple tv.

The remote is giving me carpal tunnel syndrome- just kidding, just kidding.
post #127 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Hi. Does anyone know how to disengage the Apple remote from a computer? Every time I use the remote for ATV it's affects my iMac as well even though it's behind me! Do I need to completely shut off front row? If so how do I do that? I would prefer to just shut the remote off- very annoying.

System Preferences => Security => check Disable Remote Control Infrared Receiver
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post #128 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatsFan83 View Post

Once apple starts loading up on library titles, this thing is gunna take off.

If you can buy the HD titles- yes.
If you can only rent them- no. I really can't imagine sales increasing dramatically for an HD rental box. I know it has movies for sale in ST versions but they are blocky and this is still marketed as an HD machine.
post #129 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booga View Post

Because most DVDs have DTS 5.1, which has several times the bandwidth of Dolby 5.1. And <i>it's all about bandwidth</i>. This seems like a hard thing for some people to understand, but generally the more bandwidth you give something, the higher quality you get. iTMS HD rentals give their media streams about the same bandwidth as DVDs... so if you upconvert a DVD to 720p (or 1080i or 1080p or 2160p or 17200p.. the output resolution is irrelevent) you'll probably get similar results.

No, the quality depends on the codec, and in this case H264 is used. This is a far better codec than mpeg2 (for DVD). The quality of H264 compressed movies with the bandwidth supported by Apple TV is absolutely fantastic and can be compared to HD discs.
post #130 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjtooke View Post

Was looking forward to being able to browse my movie collection by genre (and maybe search for a specific movie)...

Alas - Selecting a movie by genre only appears to be possible when you want to rent one. I guess Apple thinks most people will have no more than a handfull of movies on their system (I have about 400 now, having converted a large selection of my DVD collection to .mp4 and streaming this from a Mac mini)

Waiting on ATV Take3 . . . !

(and now after connection to my iTunes on the Mac mini the whole movie rental section seems to have disappeared completely...?)


That and My movies are at the bottom of the list, which is a bit annoying. I understand that they want people to use the store and rentals but I think my content should be given top priority. I will have to look into the parental controls and set them up so that my 6 year old doesn't start renting movies.
post #131 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

System Preferences => Security => check Disable Remote Control Infrared Receiver

Much thanks.
Can front row still be operated without the remote if I want to use it? I most likely won't now but it's good to know if I have an option. Or will I need to check this on and off everytime?
post #132 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Again I disagree. The whole purpose of ATV is for videophiles not iPods. That is why it is not selling well because those who have HD TVs just look at the image in the store and with the exception of photos- it just doesn't cut it. Hopefully these HD rentals will help change that but it's not there yet. We can buy different quality in music already on iTunes and we should be able to do so with video.
It is true the iPod video came first but now we have ATV with HDMI, built for HD TVs.

Teckstud,

I think you do a great job of explaining why AppleTV falls short of videophile expectations. However, if you think that "the whole purpose of AppleTV is for videophiles", then I think you are sadly mistaken. Different strokes for different folks. AppleTV is not just for videophiles. It is also for people who value convenience. One day in the future (when the iTunes rental library grows to include all releases) I will be able to just sit on my couch and select any movie for rental without having to drive to Blockbuster. And the movie I want to watch will be guaranteed to be in stock. Sure, there are some movies that are dazzling video treats that I will want Blue-Ray for (e.g. Lord of the Rings, Matrix, Transformers, etc) and I will likely go out and purchase those. But I will be fine with the lower quality versions of the latest romantic comedy to view with the wife, if it means all I have to do is pick up the remote and get going. Look out Blockbuster... your days of mass market appeal are ending within 5 years. Only videophiles will drive to your stores for your physical media once online delivery gets going strong.

Thompson
post #133 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Much thanks.
Can front row still be operated without the remote if I want to use it? I most likely won't now but it's good to know if I have an option. Or will I need to check this on and off everytime?

There is supposedly a procedure to "pair" a remote to a device, so the "wrong" remote doesn't trigger the device that's paired to another remote.

You'll have to check the manual or Google it to get the procedure.
post #134 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by thompr View Post

Teckstud,

I think you do a great job of explaining why AppleTV falls short of videophile expectations. However, if you think that "the whole purpose of AppleTV is for videophiles", then I think you are sadly mistaken. Different strokes for different folks. AppleTV is not just for videophiles.
Thompson

That was a bit extreme I admit. However , I said whole purpose, not sole purpose.
But the ATV is made for HDTV not TV. Why do you think it's has HDMI and component outputs only? Now not everybody who has HD is a videophile - that is true. And some people just use computer to watch porn- good for them.
So use ATV to heat a croissant too if you want - it's all up to you. Different strokes for different folks.
post #135 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregAlexander View Post

My parents love the screen saver. They leave it playing in the background - so that the pictures float up the screen.

Does this screen saver still exist in the new AppleTV?
If it doesn't, it'd be enough for them to not upgrade.....

Yes, the screen saver is the same.
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post #136 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

So use ATV to heat a croissant too if you want - it's all up to you. Different strokes for different folks.

Teckstud,

OK, if you want to resort to absurd analogies, I'll go ahead and complete it: suppose that one day I found myself in the mood for a warm croissant and -alas! - I only had a cold low-quality croissant in my refrigerator. Suppose further that I had no heat sources (stove, microwave, toaster, fireplace, whatever) other than the top of my AppleTV. It seems to me that I have 4 choices: (1) I can eat that cold low-quality croissant, (2) I can use the AppleTV to warm it up and then eat it, (3) I can get off my lazy ass and drive to a bakery where I might be able to get a hot top-of-the-line croissant (assuming they aren't already sold out, ala Blockbuster) or (4) I can just go hungry or eat something else.

The answer I choose depends on how hungry I am relative to my desire for quality (and heat). If I'm not particularly hungry at all, I may choose option (4). If I'm only slightly hungry but have a serious Jones for a tasty croissant, I may choose option (3) and hope that they have them in stock. If I'm hungry enough that I don't want to wait or I finnd that the bakery is "sold out", then I'll go for option (2). And if I'm absolutely famished and just can't wait at all, I'll just lower myself to option (1). It seems to me like you are insatiable for the quality croissant (remember, it's still just an analogy) so you can't understand why someone would opt for staying home and choking down the lousy croissant. Let me tell you something: you are not representative of the average Joe. Many people will opt to stay home and get the low quality product, because convenience matters. Someday, when bandwidth increases, we'll be able to have our high quality croissants and a high level of convenience all at the same time. But that is not true today. So until the AppleTV can deliver me the hot bakery croissant, I'll still be loving it for the warmth it does provide. And every once in a while, I'll go to the bakery.

Cheers,
Thompson
post #137 of 180
Teckstud,

I'm not in front of my Apple TV right now, but hopefully you caught that earlier response that you can indeed pair your remote to either the Apple TV or your Mac remote to your Mac. I've done it. Under Settings on Apple TV you'll see the Pairing Your Remote option. It works.

And after pairing, you can even use a learning remote to learn and control your Apple TV and not affect your Mac as you do so. Give Apple credit. It would have taken 150,000 e-mail complaints to Microsoft before they would have even admitted to a remote conflict situation, much less had a simple solution to it before people even started complaining.
post #138 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by thompr View Post

Teckstud,

OK, if you want to resort to absurd analogies, I'll go ahead and complete it: suppose that one day I found myself in the mood for a warm croissant and -alas! - I only had a cold low-quality croissant in my refrigerator. Suppose further that I had no heat sources (stove, microwave, toaster, fireplace, whatever) other than the top of my AppleTV. It seems to me that I have 4 choices: (1) I can eat that cold low-quality croissant, (2) I can use the AppleTV to warm it up and then eat it, (3) I can get off my lazy ass and drive to a bakery where I might be able to get a hot top-of-the-line croissant (assuming they aren't already sold out, ala Blockbuster) or (4) I can just go hungry or eat something else.

The answer I choose depends on how hungry I am relative to my desire for quality (and heat). If I'm not particularly hungry at all, I may choose option (4). If I'm only slightly hungry but have a serious Jones for a tasty croissant, I may choose option (3) and hope that they have them in stock. If I'm hungry enough that I don't want to wait or I finnd that the bakery is "sold out", then I'll go for option (2). And if I'm absolutely famished and just can't wait at all, I'll just lower myself to option (1). It seems to me like you are insatiable for the quality croissant (remember, it's still just an analogy) so you can't understand why someone would opt for staying home and choking down the lousy croissant. Let me tell you something: you are not representative of the average Joe. Many people will opt to stay home and get the low quality product, because convenience matters. Someday, when bandwidth increases, we'll be able to have our high quality croissants and a high level of convenience all at the same time. But that is not true today. So until the AppleTV can deliver me the hot bakery croissant, I'll still be loving it for the warmth it does provide. And every once in a while, I'll go to the bakery.

Cheers,
Thompson

All right already- you're making me hungry! And it's too cold to leave my apartment!
post #139 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Much thanks.
Can front row still be operated without the remote if I want to use it? I most likely won't now but it's good to know if I have an option. Or will I need to check this on and off everytime?

Command+Esc will enter Front Row. From there you can use the arrow and Enter keys to navigate.
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post #140 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Command+Esc will enter Front Row. From there you can use the arrow and Enter keys to navigate.

Wow! It all works great. Thank you - thank you -thank you.
post #141 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

Wow! It all works great. Thank you - thank you -thank you.

Mac OS X keyboard shortcuts
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post #142 of 180
A feature that seems to be overlooked - If you start watching a rented movie late after work, then get interrupted and head off to bed before finishing the movie, no sweat. Pause the movie and go to bed. Get up and go to work the next day, come home late and head out for drinks instead of continuing the movie. Go to work the following day and when you come home two days later, turn on Apple TV, unpause the movie and complete the viewing. It wont disappear on you.

Your rental will not auto-delete unless you:

A) Finish it all the way, and 24 hours pass.

B) You jump out of the movie after 24 hours have passed and do something "else" on your Apple TV, as if you're done with the rental. This should quell the critics that scoff at the 24 hour viewing limit. If something interrupts your viewing, hit pause, and youre covered.

Those that want to test this theory only need to pause a rental somewhere in the movie and check back 24+ hours later. It will still be frozen in time and ready for rewinding to the beginning for another viewing. If you try to get out of the expired movie, Apple gives you a warning that This (expired) movie will be deleted immediately if you stop watching it.
post #143 of 180
Haven't had a chance to rent a movie yet, but if the HD rentals are as good as the HD trailers, I'll be satisfied. The quality is far superior to an upscaled DVD, better than most broadcast HD from comcast, but obviously not as good as an HD DVD/Blu-Ray. One thing on the HD trailers though, the load bar is pretty pointless; even after it's entirely loaded, the trailer still stops and stutters 2-3 times.
post #144 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

Haven't had a chance to rent a movie yet, but if the HD rentals are as good as the HD trailers, I'll be satisfied. The quality is far superior to an upscaled DVD, better than most broadcast HD from comcast, but obviously not as good as an HD DVD/Blu-Ray. One thing on the HD trailers though, the load bar is pretty pointless; even after it's entirely loaded, the trailer still stops and stutters 2-3 times.

I agree wholeheartedly with your quality comparisons. I know BrightHouse (Used to be Time Warner) still uses MPEG-2 at 15Mbps for their HD streams.

I haven't noticed any pausing or stuttering with any HD trailers.
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post #145 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I haven't noticed any pausing or stuttering with any HD trailers.

Strange. Hopefully the problem rectifies itself, or goes away when I replace our old Linksys router with a Time Capsule sometime this month.
post #146 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

Strange. Hopefully the problem rectifies itself, or goes away when I replace our old Linksys router with a Time Capsule sometime this month.

I'm using a D-Link DIR-655, an 802.11n router on b/g/n mix mode. I've watched a good 15-20 HD trailers looking for artifacts, glitches or whatnot with the output. They are only non-scientific, superficial tests for myself but I feel they give me a good idea of what to expect. I'm more than satisfied with the results.

I only wish I could test the up-conversion to 1080p. I don't recall this option with Take 1 and wonder how it looks in comparison to 720p. I'm guessing it's not much.

PS: One unusual result of Take 2's find-as-you-type YouTube search is that I'm now using to watch many more YouTube videos than I do on a computer.
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post #147 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramsey123 View Post

A feature that seems to be overlooked - If you start watching a rented movie late after work, then get interrupted and head off to bed before finishing the movie, no sweat. Pause the movie and go to bed. Get up and go to work the next day, come home late and head out for drinks instead of continuing the movie. Go to work the following day and when you come home two days later, turn on Apple TV, unpause the movie and complete the viewing. It wont disappear on you.

Your rental will not auto-delete unless you:

A) Finish it all the way, and 24 hours pass.

B) You jump out of the movie after 24 hours have passed and do something "else" on your Apple TV, as if you're done with the rental. This should quell the critics that scoff at the 24 hour viewing limit. If something interrupts your viewing, hit pause, and youre covered.

Those that want to test this theory only need to pause a rental somewhere in the movie and check back 24+ hours later. It will still be frozen in time and ready for rewinding to the beginning for another viewing. If you try to get out of the expired movie, Apple gives you a warning that This (expired) movie will be deleted immediately if you stop watching it.

I the meantime you can't use iTunes, your AppleTV or your iPod for anything else. You can not listen to music, your kids can not watch that Disney movie you bought and you can not listen to those podcasts you download daily for your commute. Other than that, no problem.

(For all I know updating your podcasts in iTunes may even cause you to lose the movie on the AppleTV due to the automatic syncing that happens.)
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post #148 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Sigh, the Apple TV is such an unholy mess.

So that explains the three 6's stamped underneath for my serial number.
post #149 of 180
No, the option to pause a movie for more than the specified 24 hours in case you can't finish it is not a license to rent a move, start watching it, then do whatever you want for two weeks until you decide to finish watching it. The world doesn't revolve around you. The feature is a plus, not a minus.
post #150 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

So that explains the three 6's stamped underneath for my serial number.

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post #151 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramsey123 View Post

No, the option to pause a movie for more than the specified 24 hours in case you can't finish it is not a license to rent a move, start watching it, then do whatever you want for two weeks until you decide to finish watching it. The world doesn't revolve around you. The feature is a plus, not a minus.

Whose loss would it really be if it were to be that way? If a person watches a movie once within 24 hours or once over the course of two weeks, the net gain for the person is exactly the same. It's not like disc rentals where the same disc can't be rented out because it's at someone's house for two weeks.
post #152 of 180
What you are describing is a video purchase, where you watch as many times as you want for as long as you want VS. a "rental" where there are limits to your viewing time. You can see how Apple (and Hollywood) would want the two to be different experiences, right?
post #153 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramsey123 View Post

What you are describing is a video purchase, where you watch as many times as you want for as long as you want VS. a "rental" where there are limits to your viewing time.

No I'm not. Don't distort what I'm saying. In case you can't read very well: for both examples I gave, it's still just one play total.

Quote:
You can see how Apple (and Hollywood) would want the two to be different experiences, right?

This statement is based on a gross distortion of what I said, and as such, is irrelevant.
post #154 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by iDaq View Post

I live the UK and updated mine last night

What you mean you updated your aTV to use US account from UK? Sorry for my bad...

I have been reading about these US iTunes gift certificates on Ebay where they set you up a US account from UK. Sounds too good to be true, but tempting. Anybody from UK done this?
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post #155 of 180
You are all making the assumption that the only way people watch a movie is in one full session. I watch movies in much the same way I read a book, multiple sessions. I watch a portion, go off and do other things and then return and watch some more. I would rather have a public library model of the movie being viewable over a week or two than the movie theater model of being a part of a one evening date.
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post #156 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by aresee View Post

You are all making the assumption that the only way people watch a movie is in one full session. I watch movies in much the same way I read a book, multiple sessions. I watch a portion, go off and do other things and then return and watch some more. I would rather have a public library model of the movie being viewable over a week or two than the movie theater model of being a part of a one evening date.

But until then - what is the HD option? Do you think we'll be able to hack these rentals to last longer?SSShhhhh!
post #157 of 180
I can read perfectly well, JeffDM. Lets analyze what you are saying, shall we?

What you are trying to do is rip off the system without actually saying it, or perhaps you just dont realize your system is flawed. In your view you want Apple to allow folks to watch a rental movie until they have finished it, which means until you watch the credits? (Well assume you would want it to be all the way to the END of the credits before deletion, since you want everything your way.)

So days (weeks) later, when you finally leisurely finish the movie all the way through the credits, its OK then for Apple to delete it from your Apple TV drive. But in reality, you would rewind the movie (you wouldnt dare take the rewind function from the rest of us, would you JeffDM?) and youd back away from the credits as soon as they came up so that you could fool Apple into thinking you werent really done with it. Then you could still listen to music, and do whatever you wanted to do with Apple TV until you decided to watch your rental again, and again, forever. Whatever the trigger is for completion, youd be sure to back away from it just in time, even if it meant missing the last minute of the last scene.

In this way you (and hundreds of others) could own your favorite movies on your hard drive for the rental price of $3.99 ($4.99 HD) by fooling Apple into thinking you were not really done with them yet.

This is fooling no one. Apple sees through your loophole, so the current system is set up exactly as it should be to thwart abuse of the rental system.

Before you put your you cant read flamethrower on in response, ask yourself, do you really think Hollywood and Apple didnt spend countless hours hammering out the tiniest details of how the Apple TV rental delivery would work? Hollywoods #1 battle is getting people to pay for content instead of stealing it.
post #158 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramsey123 View Post

I can read perfectly well, JeffDM. Let’s analyze what you are saying, shall we?

What you are trying to do is rip off the system without actually saying it, or perhaps you just don’t realize your system is flawed. In your view you want Apple to allow folks to watch a rental movie until they have “finished it,” which means until you watch the credits? (We’ll assume you would want it to be all the way to the END of the credits before deletion, since you want everything your way.)

So days (weeks) later, when you finally leisurely finish the movie all the way through the credits, it’s OK then for Apple to delete it from your Apple TV drive. But in reality, you would rewind the movie (you wouldn’t dare take the rewind function from the rest of us, would you JeffDM?) and you’d back away from the credits as soon as they came up so that you could “fool” Apple into thinking you weren’t really done with it. Then you could still listen to music, and do whatever you wanted to do with Apple TV until you decided to watch your rental again, and again, forever. Whatever the trigger is for “completion,” you’d be sure to back away from it just in time, even if it meant missing the last minute of the last scene.

You really are brazen aren't you? How dare you make accusations like that of someone you don't know without a shred of evidence?

You do raise a scenario that the DRM mechanism would have to deal with, but it shouldn't be that hard to work out that someone was repeatedly rewinding the movie and effectively watching it over and over.

It beggars belief that you are so against the suggestion that a mechanism be introduced allowing people to watch the movie through once, regardless of how long that might take them.

Can you at least say that if a perfect, intelligent DRM system were employed that expires the movie after either 24 hours or after the first time it has been watched once, whichever comes last, that that would be a good thing for everyone?
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post #159 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by aresee View Post

You are all making the assumption that the only way people watch a movie is in one full session. I watch movies in much the same way I read a book, multiple sessions. I watch a portion, go off and do other things and then return and watch some more. I would rather have a public library model of the movie being viewable over a week or two than the movie theater model of being a part of a one evening date.

I will make the rational assumption that most people watch a movie in one sitting, that they don't ever seek to watch it again. A movie is usually 1.5—2.5 hours and usually falling around the 2hr mark. A box takes considerably more time and I'm not a slow reader. I don't need to nor want to space out my movie watching. Hell, I don't evn want my TV shows interrupted by commercials so I usually get the DVDs from Netflix months later.I say hacks will come, but


Quote:
Originally Posted by teckstud View Post

But until then - what is the HD option? Do you think we'll be able to hack these rentals to last longer?SSShhhhh!

I say hacks will come for the sake of hacking it, but since these rentals will be released 30 days after they are released on optical media and therefore DVD screeners and high-quality cams of the films will have already run rampant on file sharing sites there won't be an issue with thievery here.
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post #160 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

Can you at least say that if a perfect, intelligent DRM system were employed that expires the movie after either 24 hours or after the first time it has been watched once, whichever comes first, that that would be a good thing for everyone?

It doesn't even need to be that smart. Just disallow rewinding after the first 24 hours and totally expire it after 30 days (even 7 days is plenty) whether or not it's been watched.
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