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Next-gen MacBook Air CPU; Apple's SoHo neighbors complain - Page 2

post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmon750 View Post

That's why they still offer a CD option. It's just in an external format. I bought the MBA's external CD because certain business software only comes on CD. After I loaded them, the CD-drive went back in the original case and closed the cabinet door. I'll only use it again should I have to reload the OS or WinXP for whatever reason.

Don't forget about Remote Disc. It's not ideal, but it's pretty cool to be able to install software wirelessly. It's not fast, but it's a pretty innovative solution. I'm hoping Apple will allow Apple TV owners to connect one of those external SuperDrives they're selling as an option for MacBook Air users, making wireless Remote Disc installations possible for people who have an Apple TV, but only one computer. They could also port Mac OS X's DVD Player application to Apple TV, allowing a slightly more gradual transition from DVD to digital distribution through iTunes.

While Jobs wants to kill off disc media, this would actually help the Apple TV battle the fledgeling Blu-ray format. The Apple TV would only support DVDs, which most people have large collections of and don't want to 1) buy all of over again in digital form from iTunes, nor 2) do they know how to or see the benefits of ripping their DVD collection to digital for viewing on their Apple TV, nor 3) do they have much interest in buying a far more expensive Blu-ray player and similarly pricey BD movies, in addition to a buying a new HDTV large enough to see a major difference. Doing this would also let people use the Apple TV's very intuitive interface, as opposed to the average DVD player they may already have.
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post #42 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by wobegon View Post

I'm hoping Apple will allow Apple TV owners to connect one of those external SuperDrives they're selling as an option for MacBook Air users, making wireless Remote Disc installations possible for people who have an Apple TV, but only one computer.

I would think that the number of people with an AppleTV and a notebook as their only computer would be too small to warrant such an option. I also don't think that Apple would want to promote the slim SuperDrive to go with the AppleTV. If they were going to offer RemoteDisc from AppleTV I think it would be only as extra feature to a proper DVD or BR player that is designed to meet the aesthetics of the AppleTV. I have doubts that Apple will support optical media on the AppleTV in that way.

Your other comments got me thinking of other ways that Apple could facilitate installs without an internal optical drive. So far, we have a specialised partition of the internal HDD, USB keychain drive, external optical drive as attachment and networked optical drive.

Here are couple more options: A free installation at Apple Stores by an Apple Genius. I think they do this now, anyway, and since this is seldom done operation I don't think it would be a big deal. Consequently, issues would arise if you wanted to install a version of the OS that didn't come with the machine. Apple would have to keep a record of the OS installation you bought or have you bring in the disc or receipt for verification of purchase. However, if you bought the OS disc there and had Apple install it while you continue shopping this may not be much of an issue and would certainly increase foot traffic into the stores and encourage in store sales even if it meany paying a little more the item than buying it at Amazon. But this isn't an ideal solution.

Another, perhaps better, solution is to allow you to use whatever method you can to copy the Installation disc files to a Time Machines drive. This would be a faster install than using an optical disc. The problem with this is that not everyone uses Time Machine and there is still an issue with getting the installation files on there to begin with.

I know the optical disc is going away, but when and what alternative will be enacted when it does?
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post #43 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

[\\quote] Any insights?

3. I don't forsee a users need for storage in portables shrinking any time soon. Thus I'm not sure flash will scale fast enough. On the other hand this could be addressed as a production problem. That is stack dies in chip packages and then stack the packages. In other words produce enough chips fast enough and cheap enough so that even with todays densities you meet storage requirements.

Dave[/QUOTE]

I don't forsee users wanting less storage either, but web-based stroage options seem to growing exponentially, which could help off-set our never ending appetite for storage space.
post #44 of 50
Wow, wasn't expecting such a repsonse to my "simple" question of when to expect refreshed MBA line...

I know the MBA is slow. I have a MB Pro, which I use, at home, for Photoshop and Final Cut. What I need is a lightweight computer for basic Office docs and some web browsing.

I see no reason why the Air wouldn't fit these needs. While I'd like to wait another 3 1/2 weeks for a shiny new Air, with a massive SSD and faster processor, reality is that even if an announcement is made on the 16th I probably won't be able to get one in my hands for another few weeks after that. And I'd like to have one now.

So, tomorrow I'm off to my Apple store to get the Air with the tiny SSD. I realize there's not a huge benefit to the SSD over the traditional HD, but I'm hoping it'll add 1/2 hour of battery, and maybe speed up start-up and shut-down times, albeit slightly.

Get Office on there, Parallels, XP, and proprietary Apple software and I should be good to go.
post #45 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeeCambridge View Post

Wow, wasn't expecting such a repsonse to my "simple" question of when to expect refreshed MBA line...

I know the MBA is slow. I have a MB Pro, which I use, at home, for Photoshop and Final Cut. What I need is a lightweight computer for basic Office docs and some web browsing.

I see no reason why the Air wouldn't fit these needs. While I'd like to wait another 3 1/2 weeks for a shiny new Air, with a massive SSD and faster processor, reality is that even if an announcement is made on the 16th I probably won't be able to get one in my hands for another few weeks after that. And I'd like to have one now.

So, tomorrow I'm off to my Apple store to get the Air with the tiny SSD. I realize there's not a huge benefit to the SSD over the traditional HD, but I'm hoping it'll add 1/2 hour of battery, and maybe speed up start-up and shut-down times, albeit slightly.

Get Office on there, Parallels, XP, and proprietary Apple software and I should be good to go.

Definitely check out the videos of HDD vs. SSD HERE. You'll notice quite a speed increase by going with the SSD.


What you might be better off doing is waiting a week or so before going through with this. You'll still get the Air before the new computers debut, but what that may allow you to do is return it for the new and improved Air by simply paying a restocking fee. I don't know if you have to have bought the computer within a week of the new product's release, but if the next Air turns out to be much improved, you wouldn't have just kind of wasted your money.

With that said, why not wait? What's the rush? It's impulse vs. potential buyer's remorse. Shoot, you have a MacBook Pro! Waiting will make buying the Air all the more enjoyable.
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post #46 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidW View Post

Why drop it? I'm still using an Apple G3 Pismo PowerBook (cirra 2000) that has a removable CD/DVD-rom drive. In it's place, I can place a second battery to extend battery run time for the time that I won't be needing a CD/DVD-rom drive. Or leave it empty to save on weight.

But I guess having a removable drive no longer fits into Apple sleek design form factor.

That Pismo was a beauty and mine still works brilliantly and I have all the add-ins and plug-ins, but I'm now using a MBA for the Library and research trips and a MBP17 for heavy duty... Sigh.
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post #47 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

PPS: DavidW, how often do you use your optical drive?


I admit I rarely use the CD/DVD drive and prefer to use the bay for an extra battery to extend my battery time. I mainly use the laptop to get on the internet at home, away from my desktop. And as a CD jukebox for my stereo. (I copy my music into it using AIFF lossless. This way I don't have to search for CDs' to play on my home stereo.) But this is not to say that I will never need a CD/DVD drive. All the software I have in the laptop are on CDs'. So if I ever have to reload them, I would need a CD drive.

Plus this is an older laptop and it doesn't have USB2 or 801.1 g/n. But it has Firewire. So loading several Gigs of data (photos and music) from a USB flash drive or over my network can take awhile. It is easier for me to burn the data on to a CD/DVD and then transfer the data that way. Either that or drag it into my firewire iPod.

But I can see Apple eliminating the CD/DVD drive from their laptops. I can probablly do 99% of what I need a CD/DVD drive for over a network drive or with a USB2 flash drive. But every once in awhile I like to watch a movie, on my laptop, while traveling on an airplane. And I better get something in exchange for not having a CD/DVD drive. Like 10 hours battery time. Eliminating the drive to make the laptop cheaper, slimmer or lighter is not a priority with me.
post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeeCambridge View Post

Wow, wasn't expecting such a repsonse to my "simple" question of when to expect refreshed MBA line...

I know the MBA is slow. I have a MB Pro, which I use, at home, for Photoshop and Final Cut. What I need is a lightweight computer for basic Office docs and some web browsing.

I see no reason why the Air wouldn't fit these needs. While I'd like to wait another 3 1/2 weeks for a shiny new Air, with a massive SSD and faster processor, reality is that even if an announcement is made on the 16th I probably won't be able to get one in my hands for another few weeks after that. And I'd like to have one now.

So, tomorrow I'm off to my Apple store to get the Air with the tiny SSD. I realize there's not a huge benefit to the SSD over the traditional HD, but I'm hoping it'll add 1/2 hour of battery, and maybe speed up start-up and shut-down times, albeit slightly.

Get Office on there, Parallels, XP, and proprietary Apple software and I should be good to go.

The MBA is not "slow" based on what you said your needs are for an ultralight. Ignore what other people say the MBA is. They either have not bought one, or "heard from a friend", or did not do their research and were taken in by the "oooh" and "ahhh" factors of the MBA. So long as you are not looking to do major graphics work and don't need a huge storage space, the MBA fits the bill perfectly. I have not used Parallels but I am a big user of WMware Fusion and have installed it on several machines for both personal and corporate use and I can say for certain that even on my MBA, VMWare/Fusion works flawlessly and runs much faster than an old 4-year dedicated Windows PC I still keep running in a back room.

I tried the SSD model just out of curiosity and did notice a big difference in performance compared to my HDD model. I just could not justify the price difference. But if you can, go for it. It was way cool and a bit quieter too.

Hope this helps. Good luck on your purchase tomorrow!
post #49 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidW View Post

I admit I rarely use the CD/DVD drive and prefer to use the bay for an extra battery to extend my battery time. I mainly use the laptop to get on the internet at home, away from my desktop. And as a CD jukebox for my stereo. (I copy my music into it using AIFF lossless. This way I don't have to search for CDs' to play on my home stereo.) But this is not to say that I will never need a CD/DVD drive. All the software I have in the laptop are on CDs'. So if I ever have to reload them, I would need a CD drive.

Plus this is an older laptop and it doesn't have USB2 or 801.1 g/n. But it has Firewire. So loading several Gigs of data (photos and music) from a USB flash drive or over my network can take awhile. It is easier for me to burn the data on to a CD/DVD and then transfer the data that way. Either that or drag it into my firewire iPod.

But I can see Apple eliminating the CD/DVD drive from their laptops. I can probablly do 99% of what I need a CD/DVD drive for over a network drive or with a USB2 flash drive. But every once in awhile I like to watch a movie, on my laptop, while traveling on an airplane. And I better get something in exchange for not having a CD/DVD drive. Like 10 hours battery time. Eliminating the drive to make the laptop cheaper, slimmer or lighter is not a priority with me.

The MBA just isn't for you then. That's why they have a regular MacBook and MacBook Pro if having that internal DVD drive and a bigger/replaceable battery is a priority for you. Nothing personal. The MBA was designed for maximum lightness and the tightest profile. It works for me (I'm a very happy MBA owner) but you would probably be a bit disappointed by it. I never use the CD and gladly give up the space for a smaller machine. Battery life is (has) not been an issue for me since I'm always near a power outlet and I don't fly on a plane enough to justify a bigger machine/battery for the few times I fly and I rarely watch movies on laptops.

There's always the option of playing movies via iTunes. That's what I do. But yes, carrying DVD's would not fit the bill unless you want to carry the external drive around.
post #50 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I would think that the number of people with an AppleTV and a notebook as their only computer would be too small to warrant such an option. I also don't think that Apple would want to promote the slim SuperDrive to go with the AppleTV. If they were going to offer RemoteDisc from AppleTV I think it would be only as extra feature to a proper DVD or BR player that is designed to meet the aesthetics of the AppleTV. I have doubts that Apple will support optical media on the AppleTV in that way.

Yeah, the idea of using the external SuperDrive with Apple TV is more based on the idea of allowing people to use their own DVDs, which the MPAA ain't gonna allow ripping though iTunes as the RIAA has for CDs. While Apple's iTunes rental collection is rather impressive, its buyable movies are much fewer, which is the case with all the digital set-top-boxes. That seems in large part due to the out of touch movie studios who want to sell far more expensive disc-based media with much more draconian DRM: Blu-ray. Also, while some consumers can see the value in near instant, cheap, easily browseable digital iTunes movie rentals they can buy from the couch, the same likely can't be said for buying new movies or re-buying movies they already have on DVD in digital form.

That's why selling the optional external MacBook Air SuperDrive as a cheap $100 DVD player that connects with the Apple TV, allowing the user to play back their DVD collection in a slick, yet intuitive interface, in addition to all the other functionality (rental movies, TV episodes, photo viewing, music streaming, free video podcasts, etc.) that can't be had by the average standalone DVD player.

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Your other comments got me thinking of other ways that Apple could facilitate installs without an internal optical drive. So far, we have a specialised partition of the internal HDD, USB keychain drive, external optical drive as attachment and networked optical drive.

Here are couple more options: A free installation at Apple Stores by an Apple Genius. I think they do this now, anyway, and since this is seldom done operation I don't think it would be a big deal. Consequently, issues would arise if you wanted to install a version of the OS that didn't come with the machine. Apple would have to keep a record of the OS installation you bought or have you bring in the disc or receipt for verification of purchase. However, if you bought the OS disc there and had Apple install it while you continue shopping this may not be much of an issue and would certainly increase foot traffic into the stores and encourage in store sales even if it meany paying a little more the item than buying it at Amazon. But this isn't an ideal solution.

I'm not sure about such large scale installs involving operating systems, but on a smaller scale, another option for installing programs would be to create a Mac section within the iTunes App Store. Obviously, Apple couldn't condone anything and everything like P2P apps and such, and it would be a completely optional path to the end user (a.k.a., independent third party developers could still distribute their apps on their websites as they already do), but it would make software installation as easy and seamless as buying music off iTunes, or buying iPhone apps.

These apps would be certifiably safe, have much greater exposure to users, and would be easily update-able via either iTunes or Software Update, though they could possibly be less constricted in terms of FairPlay. Perhaps they'd be listed more like podcasts, where Apple provides an slick, intuitive database, but the developers continue to host the apps on their servers. I mean, Apple already has a very capable online database of Mac apps and Dashboard widgets in their website's Downloads section, so it's probably only a matter of time before they incorporate that into iTunes as well as some of their own apps, like the iWork suite for starters.
False comparisons do not a valid argument make.
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