Apple leads international smartphone market growth

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
Sales of iPhones increased more than sixfold during the second quarter of 2009, helping Apple maintain its ranking as the third largest smartphone maker worldwide, according to a new report.



In an international review of mobile phone and smartphone sales, Gartner research director Carolina Milanesi reports that Apple sold more than 5.4 million iPhones in the second quarter of 2009. That number is well up from the 892,000 sold during that period in 2008, and represents the largest expansion of any smartphone maker. That growth brought the handset maker from a 2.8 percent market share to a 13.3 percent share of second-quarter sales in 2009.



In all, 40.9 million smartphones were sold during the period, representing 27 percent growth from 2008. Nokia was the worldwide leader, moving 18.4 million smartphones during the period, up from 15.2 million a year prior. Even with that increase, though, Nokia's market share dropped from 47.4 percent to 45 percent, demonstrating that the smartphone market is becoming even more crowded and competitive.



Second globally was Research in Motion, which captured 18.7 percent of the market, selling 7.6 million phones. In fourth was HTC with 6 percent share, and Fujitsu was in fifth with 3 percent.



Apple initially moved into third place globally in the third quarter of 2008, as the iPhone has continued its expansion internationally. The impact of the recently launched iPhone 3GS will not be seen until the second half of 2009, the Gartner analysis said.



"Apple's expansion into a larger number of countries in the past year has produced a clear effect on sales volumes, as have the recent price adjustments on the 8GB 3G iPhone," the report states.



In terms of operating systems, Symbian controlled the lion's share of the market with 51 percent, down from 57 percent a year before. Google's Android platform took just under 2 percent of the market.







Even with the growing popularity of smartphones, sales of overall phones were dragged down 6 percent for the quarter, to 286.1 million.



"Despite the challenging market, some devices sold well as consumers who would usually have purchased standard midrange devices either cut back to less expensive handsets or moved up the range to get more features for their money," Milanesi said. "Touchscreen and QWERTY devices remained a major driver for replacement sales and benefited manufacturers with strong, touch-focused mid-tier devices."



In terms of global mobile phone sales, Nokia wass again the leader, with 36.8 percent of the market, followed by Samsung, LG, Motorla and Sony Ericsson.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 39
    Huh? Where are the vaunted LGs and Samsungs (in the smartphone market), which have supposedly sold in the gazillions
  • Reply 2 of 39
    So when can we expect Steve Balmer's response to this report that the iPhone is still a "fad" and doesn't represent the "true" smartphone market ?
  • Reply 3 of 39
    chronsterchronster Posts: 1,894member
    Sixfold is impressive. Other companies are really gonna need to step it up now lol



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ZeroKelvin View Post


    So when can we expect Steve Balmer's response to this report that the iPhone is still a "fad" and doesn't represent the "true" smartphone market ?



    HOPEFULLY right after he gets fired.
  • Reply 4 of 39
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,743member
    Ballmer should be axed. Seriously, this blockhead is an embarrassment. No vision, no understanding of tech, and completely out of touch with the pulse of the market.
  • Reply 5 of 39
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,743member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    Huh? Where are the vaunted LGs and Samsungs (in the smartphone market), which have supposedly sold in the gazillions



    Volume without substance. That's all it is. Not very profitable in the long run, and a great recipe for falling behind.
  • Reply 6 of 39
    roos24roos24 Posts: 170member
    This again is proof of Apple's leadership. They developed a product that they would like to use themselves (quote from SJ) and not something that they hoped other users would like. Apple understood that the power of a smart phone primarily comes from the software, with the hardware only secondary. Even today, some wannabe smartphone makers still do not get that.



    I hope that Apple will be able to keep a clear view of how they get where they want to be, and not let their vision be troubled by sales figures or try to be the number one in sales. If they just keep making something that they believe in, the sales figures will follow.



    Nonetheless, with this pace RIM will soon be the no. 3, for all that's worth.



    Jan
  • Reply 7 of 39
    mactrippermactripper Posts: 1,328member
    What we need is less expensive iPhone plans, nearly $100 a month for two years is insane!



    I only pay $10-$15 a month for voice, would pay double that for data included no sweat and a flat rate for the device up front so Apple gets theirs.



    Take a look a this article and you'll see that carrier/hardware maker "deals" are killing more adoption of the iPhone.



    http://www.oecd.org/document/20/0,33..._1_1_1,00.html





    And yes the FCC needs to step in and stop this practice, or at least allow people to have the cash to buy their iPhone upfront and pay a much lower monthly rates and allow carriers to compete.



    Although I could easily buy several iPhones, I feel getting value for money and championing value for others so they can afford one is important.



    People who have money don't like to be gouged either, it's a insult.
  • Reply 8 of 39
    elrothelroth Posts: 1,201member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    In all, 40.9 smartphones were sold during the period



    I bought the .9 smartphone - every once in a while it just stares blankly, stutters for a few seconds, then gets back on track. It's mostly smart.
  • Reply 9 of 39
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post


    What we need is less expensive iPhone plans, nearly $100 a month for two years is insane!



    I only pay $10-$15 a month for voice, would pay double that for data included no sweat and a flat rate for the device up front so Apple gets theirs.



    Take a look a this article and you'll see that carrier/hardware maker "deals" are killing more adoption of the iPhone.



    http://www.oecd.org/document/20/0,33..._1_1_1,00.html





    And yes the FCC needs to step in and stop this practice, or at least allow people to have the cash to buy their iPhone upfront and pay a much lower monthly rates and allow carriers to compete.



    Although I could easily buy several iPhones, I feel getting value for money and championing value for others so they can afford one is important.



    People who have money don't like to be gouged either, it's a insult.



    Well I recently read in the news that the US, Spain and a couple of other countries were the most expensive countries for mobile phone contracts. Finland and the Netherlands, however, were the cheapest. I just think that geographically your mobile phone providers need to cover a larger area per head. Also the terrain in the US is a lot harder to cover. And therefore a lot harder to set up, maintain and upgrade. Unless a new technology is used to handle the signal, the US and other countries alike are going to be far more expensive. The Netherlands on the other handis flat and small. Making it much easier to set up, maintain and upgrade. Having more coverage per head, a lot more people share the same connection. So either move to Finland or the Netherlands or hope that a new technology will solve all the afore mentioned problems.
  • Reply 10 of 39
    aaarrrggghaaarrrgggh Posts: 1,577member
    The six-fold growth is based on effectively zero supply in CYQ2, right? The numbers are impressive, but I still have trouble understanding what exactly people see in Nokia's smart phone offerings to get that level of sales. I know the US-centric view isn't the best way to look at it, but I see far more HTC smartphones than Nokia. In Europe I saw more Samsung, and in Asia it was HTC, but that is a much more limited sampling.



    It will be interesting to see how things change with Palm in the mix, and if we will ever see rate plans drop in price in the US.
  • Reply 11 of 39
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    Ballmer should be axed. Seriously, this blockhead is an embarrassment. No vision, no understanding of tech, and completely out of touch with the pulse of the market.



    indeed. he'd be a very good used car salesman though!
  • Reply 12 of 39
    aaarrrggghaaarrrgggh Posts: 1,577member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacShack View Post


    Well I recently read in the news that the US, Spain and a couple of other countries were the most expensive countries for mobile phone contracts. Finland and the Netherlands, however, were the cheapest. I just think that geographically your mobile phone providers need to cover a larger area per head. Also the terrain in the US is a lot harder to cover. And therefore a lot harder to set up, maintain and upgrade. Unless a new technology is used to handle the signal, the US and other countries alike are going to be far more expensive. The Netherlands on the other handis flat and small. Making it much easier to set up, maintain and upgrade. Having more coverage per head, a lot more people share the same connection. So either move to Finland or the Netherlands or hope that a new technology will solve all the afore mentioned problems.



    I used to subscribe to that thesis, but... coverage in metro areas is still awful, and the phone companies really aren't trying to make things dramatically better. It seems like the technology of expensive base stations is kind of a losing proposition in metro areas, and the technology for coverage in rural areas doesn't really cover a large enough range.



    Every time I see an old Ricochet Modem strapped to a street light I think about how much nicer that architecture is than the cellular networks (with modern technology and cheaper access to T1 uplinks).



    Pricing in the US seems to be based on lock-in, and the stigma of pre-paid plans here.
  • Reply 13 of 39
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post


    What we need is less expensive iPhone plans, nearly $100 a month for two years is insane!



    Check my work on this, but I believe the least expensive plan is $79/month, which is competitive with other phones in this class. That being said, still too expensive for me. Not that I can't afford it, I simply don't use a mobile phone enough to justify the freight. Get me a more limited minute and data plan for $50/month and I'm on board. Keeping this on topic, I think the iPhone is breaking down the artificial "smart phone" vs. "dumb phone" barrier. They could smash that barrier if they tailored plans to fit the needs of people who would like to own a good phone, but don't live on their mobiles.
  • Reply 14 of 39
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by emulator View Post


    indeed. he'd be a very good used car salesman though!



    Which reminds me of...







    I will leave the requisite alterations to the Photoshop jocks.
  • Reply 15 of 39
    richlrichl Posts: 2,213member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    Huh? Where are the vaunted LGs and Samsungs (in the smartphone market), which have supposedly sold in the gazillions



    They aren't smartphones so aren't included in the figures.



    The above article gets the major reason why iPhone sales increased by such a large figure wrong. The real and very obvious reason is that the 2G iPhone was withdrawn from sale months before the 3G was released. However, I agree that international sales are very important for future growth.



    Making a concerted push into China, India, Russia and Brazil is far more important than releasing a CDMA iPhone for Verizon.



    On a different topic, I think all 5.4 million iPhones were sold in London. It seems like everyone has one these days!
  • Reply 16 of 39
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RichL View Post


    However, I agree that intentional sales are very important for future growth.



    Right, you just can't count on those unintentional sales!



    Sorry, but that has to be my favorite typo for the week.
  • Reply 17 of 39
    richlrichl Posts: 2,213member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    Right, you just can't count on those unintentional sales!



    Sorry, but that has to be my favorite typo for the week.



    Haha. Corrected!
  • Reply 18 of 39
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,743member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    Right, you just can't count on those unintentional sales!



    Sorry, but that has to be my favorite typo for the week.



    It is a fun typo, isn't it?
  • Reply 19 of 39
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RichL View Post


    They aren't smartphones so aren't included in the figures.



    Lies, damned lies, and statistics.....
  • Reply 20 of 39
    tenobelltenobell Posts: 7,014member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTripper View Post


    What we need is less expensive iPhone plans, nearly $100 a month for two years is insane!



    That's only your opinion. You also have to look at the billions per year that mobile phone carriers spend on their networks, this is not a cheap business.





    Quote:

    And yes the FCC needs to step in and stop this practice, or at least allow people to have the cash to buy their iPhone upfront and pay a much lower monthly rates and allow carriers to compete.



    The FCC cannot stop this practice. The iPhone is only one of hundreds of phones. Simply because its the most desired phone does not mean the FCC gets to dictate how it is sold, that is against the free market. Other phone manufacturers have to develop better phones and compete.
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