Apple's campaign to win the App Store publicity battle

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  • Reply 41 of 55
    tulkastulkas Posts: 3,744member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by scosee View Post


    Apple owns the app store .

    And they protect it for the benefit of all

    including the programers.



    anything else is bollocks



    Wow, I had no idea of their benevolence.



    Don't kid yourself. They 'protect' it for their own benefit. They are a business and should do so. It is a question of how they should go in doing so and how they go about it.
  • Reply 42 of 55
    ivan.rnn01ivan.rnn01 Posts: 1,822member
    Already wrote and am writing that again.

    AppStore is now rushing right in its midlife crisis. Developers drop functionality of their applications for the sake of development speed and reducing number of possible bugs. The applications implementing fresh ideas are banned on the request of "partners".

    All those same policies of Apple business model, which propelled the store's former success, now lead it to customer annoyance and frustration. Apple must review the situation.

    Apparently, seeing the top management active involvement in discussions, one can say they actually do.
  • Reply 43 of 55
    tulkastulkas Posts: 3,744member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post


    I stand corrected. I also agree that communication could be improved. But I wonder how we would all feel if Apple actually revealed the other side of rejections as publicly as the developers complain. I bet there would be a lot less sympathy for the jilted devs. Apple grew this store from 0-65,000 in a year. Did Palm do so well in its early days? Who else is facing this challenge and who is doing better. We do not hear about the rejections from BB, Palm, Android, and MS apps stores mostly because no body cares. I do not believe Apple is doing any worse than anyone else as far as rejections go. There is just a bigger microscope aimed at them and more people who have an axe to grind with them. As I stated in a previous post, Palm is taking the same approach as Apple. It seems all the other companies even agree on the 70-30 split. Go figure.



    I am sure the vast majority of rejected apps are rejected with good reason and probably for reasons that even the most rabid anti-Apple hater would accept or agree with. The problem is that they appear to be inconsistent, arbitrary and wrong in some of the high profile rejections.



    Apple 'grew' the App Store to 65,000 in a year, but those were 65,000 apps from developers...Apple did not do it alone. Also, Apple has the single most amazing marketing machine in the world, due in large part to Jobs. They build hype and media frenzy for their products and have built a 'cool' brand image, which are mainly responsible the explosive growth of the iPhone. If MS had released the identical device a year before, it would have likely been a success but would not have achieved nearly the levels that Apple has managed. They get far more attention as a company, positive and negative, than their products can justify. This has usually been a good thing. Even in the bad old days, when they were usually referred to as 'beleaguered' or 'soon to fail', they had us as such a dedicated fan base that they still received an undue amount of press and attention.



    But along with this attention, media coverage and hype that they have built, there will be negative coverage as well. This is important. We cannot expect only sunshine and rainbows in their coverage nor would this benefit Apple or the Apple community.



    I have long been accused of being a mac zealot and have used Apple products for almost 30 years, since my dad brought home our first Apple II (e or c). But lately, with the resurgence of Apple in the last few years, it seems like every newbie with an iPod or iPhone has decided to take on the mantle of Apple Protector. Unfortunately, they seem to have latched onto the concept of Apple Zealot and decided it means they need to turn their brains off. If Apple is criticized, even with good reason, then these nouveau Mac Zealots explode with accusations of Apple hating.



    The Apple community has always included spirited debate on their direction, products and policies. This has been to the benefit of Apple. If not for developer and community outrage over Taligent, we might not have had the Next acquisition. If not for user dissatisfaction over the stagnation of OS7, we might never have had OSX. If not for developers begging for a native API and SDK, we might never have even had an App Store.
  • Reply 44 of 55
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    I also find it sad and inexplicable that your sdatisfaction with the iPhone at large seems to rest on a single App that in the big picture of Apple and the iPhone (and what the iPhone brings to the table) doesn't mean a whole lot.



    So switch to a BlacckBerry or whatever other phone supports Google Voice. Dollars-to-donuts you'll quickly see why it would hardly be worth it.



    Yes, I'm an Apple fanboy. Apple makes it damn easy to be one.



    That's true. But when people around you own iPhones, it dampens the exclusivity. 6 people in my family already own iPhones excluding me although I have one..
  • Reply 45 of 55
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by scosee View Post


    Agreed.







    I think they protect it for the good of Apple first, then the "good" of the content producers with which they have agreements, then us users, and then the developers. Although the last two may be in the wrong order, but who knows. Most of us customers don't really need their protection from the content we want, just from malware. We, except maybe for you, are capable of deciding for ourselves what content we'd like, in what form, and from whom we'd like to get it.







    Bullsh!t. If they did this wouldn't have become the issue it has become. That could be changing, but we'll have to wait to know.







    Whatever. At least we agree that Apple owns the App Store.



    scosee



    The App Store space is still overwhelmed by Apple. Nothing is on par with it yet.
  • Reply 46 of 55
    I think the issue that Apple is probably seeing is that their current policy of no accountability when it comes to App rejections will inevitably lead to fewer and fewer good/innovative Apps .. and more and more copycat Apps. This would inevitably lead to the death of the App store as it becomes harder and harder to find worthwhile Apps in the sea of trash.



    With the current policy, why would developers continue to invest time in anything new when that newness actually decreases your chances of making a profit, because Apple is more likely to reject your App outright. Far better to produce something quick and safe.



    On the surface, this looks like a few whining devs - but followed to its logical conclusion, it does have serious consequences for the App store, Apple and the consumer.
  • Reply 47 of 55
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dr_lha View Post


    I'm no tech writer, but I'm pretty pissed off with the Google Voice thing. I speak as a Google Voice user who purchased GV Mobile from the App Store, and now will not be getting any of the promised upgrades to the software because Apple pulled it.



    I guess in your world Apple shouldn't care about tech savvy users like me, and only care about the majority of non-moaners. Still I personally have been responsible to turning a lot of people into Mac users, both in my personal interactions, and converting my work to almost 100% Mac in the last 5 years.



    The whole Google Voice thing has taken the shine off the iPhone for me. Defending Apple with arguments like "the majority don't care" is fanboyism of the highest order.



    Agreed!



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    I also find it sad and inexplicable that your sdatisfaction with the iPhone at large seems to rest on a single App that in the big picture of Apple and the iPhone (and what the iPhone brings to the table) doesn't mean a whole lot.



    So switch to a BlacckBerry or whatever other phone supports Google Voice. Dollars-to-donuts you'll quickly see why it would hardly be worth it.



    Yes, I'm an Apple fanboy. Apple makes it damn easy to be one.



    You're not getting it. Its not about just one app. Apple limits apps that can officially run on the iPhone to those purchased or obtained through the App Store. Apple then turns around and behaves somewhat inconsistently and erratically in their approval process up to and including pulling apps that had previously been approved and SOLD to users.



    Either loosen up and streamline the approval process or open the floodgates to 3rd party apps.
  • Reply 48 of 55
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,743member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by blogorant View Post


    Agreed!







    You're not getting it. Its not about just one app. Apple limits apps that can officially run on the iPhone to those purchased or obtained through the App Store. Apple then turns around and behaves somewhat inconsistently and erratically in their approval process up to and including pulling apps that had previously been approved and SOLD to users.



    Either loosen up and streamline the approval process or open the floodgates to 3rd party apps.



    Apple limits apps that can officially run on the iPhone to those purchased or obtained through the App Store.



    Fine by me. Been working out just fine for me so far. All my needs are met by the apps on offer on the App Store. I se no reason to go anywhere else. And it seems like the majority of iPhone users, who are very satisfied with the device, are alright with this as well. Why should I go anywhere else when everything's in one place? That's the entire point.



    Apple then turns around and behaves somewhat inconsistently and erratically in their approval process



    They're in brand new territory. Growing pains. It'll gte sorted out. The problem is hardly catastrophic. The competition can only wish it had this kind of problem.



    up to and including pulling apps that had previously been approved and SOLD to users.



    So Apple removed apps from users' iPhones without their permission AND without refunding them their money???
  • Reply 49 of 55
    tulkastulkas Posts: 3,744member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    Apple limits apps that can officially run on the iPhone to those purchased or obtained through the App Store.



    Fine by me. Been working out just fine for me so far. All my needs are met by the apps on offer on the App Store. I se no reason to go anywhere else. And it seems like the majority of iPhone users, who are very satisfied with the device, are alright with this as well. Why should I go anywhere else when everything's in one place? That's the entire point.



    Some people like choice. In fact, it is a sign of intelligence and independent thinking to be able to make choices and not have them made for you. If all of you needs are met by the App Store, that is great. I wouldn't mind Apple limiting what is available on the App Store, if they allowed customers to buy apps elsewhere. But they can't And so they are then in a position of having no choice in where to buy the apps and then limited in what apps they can buy from the one location available.



    It works for many. It really shows how easily some people are led and how much some people need instruction on what they want or need. I guess these people will waiting until they are told what to want or need next. Otherwise, since they already have everything they want or need from the App Store, they obviously will never buy another app...until they are told they can want another.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    Apple then turns around and behaves somewhat inconsistently and erratically in their approval process



    They're in brand new territory. Growing pains. It'll gte sorted out. The problem is hardly catastrophic. The competition can only wish it had this kind of problem.



    Probably. In the meantime, developers waste their time and money. I am sure they they appreciate your support as they lose money. After all, it's just growing pains. These are people's livelihoods that you are so cavalier in writing off. Fck the competition. This has nothing to do with the competition. I wish people would stop bringing up the competition. The inconsistency and outright wrong decisions, in some cases negatively impacts Apple's customers and developers.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    up to and including pulling apps that had previously been approved and SOLD to users.



    So Apple removed apps from users' iPhones without their permission AND without refunding them their money???



    No, they pulled the apps, thereby preventing the devs from ever being able to update their customers. Of course, this then led to significant numbers of refunds. Refunds come from the developers, so guess who loses? Oh wait, I forgot...it'll get sorted.





    I love Apple products and am a huge fan of the company. But after all these years, I still don't understand how some people are willing to swallow whatever they are told to by the company.
  • Reply 50 of 55
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    Apple limits apps that can officially run on the iPhone to those purchased or obtained through the App Store.



    Fine by me. Been working out just fine for me so far. All my needs are met by the apps on offer on the App Store. I se no reason to go anywhere else. And it seems like the majority of iPhone users, who are very satisfied with the device, are alright with this as well. Why should I go anywhere else when everything's in one place? That's the entire point.



    Apple then turns around and behaves somewhat inconsistently and erratically in their approval process



    They're in brand new territory. Growing pains. It'll gte sorted out. The problem is hardly catastrophic. The competition can only wish it had this kind of problem.



    up to and including pulling apps that had previously been approved and SOLD to users.



    So Apple removed apps from users' iPhones without their permission AND without refunding them their money???



    I'm guessing that the apps remain in the user's phone? Am I right?
  • Reply 51 of 55
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,743member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SGSStateStudent View Post


    I'm guessing that the apps remain in the user's phone? Am I right?



    Yes, they do, from what we're being told.
  • Reply 52 of 55
    tulkastulkas Posts: 3,744member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SGSStateStudent View Post


    I'm guessing that the apps remain in the user's phone? Am I right?



    yes they do, and they can never receive an update. You know, those funny things for bug fixes and enhancements that are part of what you paid for.
  • Reply 53 of 55
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,743member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tulkas View Post


    yes they do, and they can never receive an update. You know, those funny things for bug fixes and enhancements that are part of what you paid for.



    Well, you pay fort the app itself. Enhancements and bug fixes are are a by-product of that, but thr developer need not release any. Your money only buys you the app as it stands at the time of purchase.
  • Reply 54 of 55
    tulkastulkas Posts: 3,744member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    Well, you pay fort the app itself. Enhancements and bug fixes are are a by-product of that, but thr developer need not release any. Your money only buys you the app as it stands at the time of purchase.



    Mostly true. However, all customers expect at the very least, bug fixes to be a part of their purchase price. This is true of all software, PC, Macs, iPhones, etc. If a product is found to be broken, you expect you should be able to get it fixed. Apple has promoted the ability and ease of updating apps from the App Store as an important feature, and it is a great one. Killing an already selling app prevents customers from receiving these needed patches. They can opt to continue using it with problems or refund it and hurt the developer.
  • Reply 55 of 55
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,743member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tulkas View Post


    Mostly true. However, all customers expect at the very least, bug fixes to be a part of their purchase price. This is true of all software, PC, Macs, iPhones, etc. If a product is found to be broken, you expect you should be able to get it fixed. Apple has promoted the ability and ease of updating apps from the App Store as an important feature, and it is a great one. Killing an already selling app prevents customers from receiving these needed patches. They can opt to continue using it with problems or refund it and hurt the developer.



    You do have a point. Take the 3.0 OS upgrade, for example.
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