New Apple Mac ad features familiar face, Blu-ray PC adoption low

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 93
    davidwdavidw Posts: 1,408member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by teckstud View Post


    I agree. All those "I'm a Mac" ads for how many years yielded barely double digit percentage market share?

    And everyone agrees it was the iPhone and iPod that did that- not those adds no matter how entertaining Justin Long is. It's Justin Long that owes his career to Apple.



    In 2006 Mac market share was about 4%. It's now at about 8%. So Mac market share increased by 100% in about 3 years. AAPL was at about $75 in 2006 and it's now about $170. If you didn't panic and sell during the economic downturn, your investment in AAPL also increased by 100%. Don't worry about double digit market share. It's not how fast you go. It's how fast you go fast. And right now Apple is still out accelerating all the other PC makers in gaining market share.



    And it wasn't the iPod or iPhone that contributed the most to Apple market share growth. It was VISTA.
  • Reply 42 of 93
    I heard of a new disc that has like 50 times the capacity of BRD. Time keeps on slipping away.
  • Reply 43 of 93
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


    Seriously the writing is on the wall here, tablets will not have optical drives, so distribution needs a new vehicle. The rational vehicle is SD memory cards. Combine that with the need to eliminate optical drives from laptops and it becomes obvious that Blu-Rays future is extremely limited.



    The reliability and low power nature of SD flash storage is about to steam roll into the handheld and laptop market. Like it or not CD type drives are very legacy in nature.





    Dave



    DRM and cost of production count against this.
  • Reply 44 of 93
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    What made you switch? Just curious....



    Poor build quality (I went through 3 MBPs, all of which Apple stated were their own error.), I found that in college, Office on the Mac, and even more so iWork, was limiting in what I could do and who I was compatible with (I like to have complete control of my formatting for when the professor would see my work. It often got messed up in the conversion process.) I found that in the workplace, Windows was used more than Mac. In my free time I like to play some computer games (not a lot though) and the drivers for the Mobile graphics cards were usually way behind in windows (and games for the mac were limited).



    The only thing I was using a mac for was Final Cut Suite, and Garage Band. Everything else I could do perfectly well on a PC. The cost of the mac hardware doesn't continue to justify the two titles. I have a mac mini happily running away with an old G4 chip for those two titles. (I liked Adium too, a lot, but again, can't keep me on the Mac)



    Mainly: Its not worth it to me any more. Same hardware as a PC anyhow. I'm not a fan of labels, or the thin sleek cases. I want to tinker with my computer, replace the GFX cards, replace Hard drives, processors, motherboards, etc at will. A mac does not allow that freedom. And I don't find its OS that revolutionary to buy a mac currently. My old G4 mini suffices well enough. Also, I really am getting tired of the Apple mentality, of the company telling me what I can do with what I bought from them. Its a very closed off thought process that discourages me rather than invites me.



    I am trying to get away from Windows too mind you. Vista was a failure.



    Linux:

    iMovie/Final Cut Express - kdenlive (its available for OS X too)

    iPhoto - Picasa/FSpot

    iWeb - Kompozer

    GarageBand - Rosegarden + Qsynth

    iDVD - No real competitor here, but Apple hasn't updated that title anyway.

    iWork - OpenOffice (though keynote is a league ahead of everyone when it comes to animations. I never used it because it wasn't fully compatible with Powerpoint.)

    Adium/iChat - Pidgin

    Mail + iCal + Addressbook - Thunderbird

    Parallels - VirtualBox (also for Mac)

    WindowsXP - Wine (though not fully there, but impressive thus far! Also for Mac)



    For basics, it works quite well, and stable. You don't get all the templates and such, but a true artist would create their own.
  • Reply 45 of 93
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by camroidv27 View Post


    Poor build quality (I went through 3 MBPs, all of which Apple stated were their own error.), I found that in college, Office on the Mac, and even more so iWork, was limiting in what I could do and who I was compatible with (I like to have complete control of my formatting for when the professor would see my work. It often got messed up in the conversion process.) I found that in the workplace, Windows was used more than Mac. In my free time I like to play some computer games (not a lot though) and the drivers for the Mobile graphics cards were usually way behind in windows (and games for the mac were limited).



    The only thing I was using a mac for was Final Cut Suite, and Garage Band. Everything else I could do perfectly well on a PC. The cost of the mac hardware doesn't continue to justify the two titles. I have a mac mini happily running away with an old G4 chip for those two titles. (I liked Adium too, a lot, but again, can't keep me on the Mac)



    Mainly: Its not worth it to me any more. Same hardware as a PC anyhow. I'm not a fan of labels, or the thin sleek cases. I want to tinker with my computer, replace the GFX cards, replace Hard drives, processors, motherboards, etc at will. A mac does not allow that freedom. And I don't find its OS that revolutionary to buy a mac currently. My old G4 mini suffices well enough. Also, I really am getting tired of the Apple mentality, of the company telling me what I can do with what I bought from them. Its a very closed off thought process that discourages me rather than invites me.



    I am trying to get away from Windows too mind you. Vista was a failure.



    Linux:

    iMovie/Final Cut Express - kdenlive (its available for OS X too)

    iPhoto - Picasa/FSpot

    iWeb - Kompozer

    GarageBand - Rosegarden + Qsynth

    iDVD - No real competitor here, but Apple hasn't updated that title anyway.

    iWork - OpenOffice (though keynote is a league ahead of everyone when it comes to animations. I never used it because it wasn't fully compatible with Powerpoint.)

    Adium/iChat - Pidgin

    Mail + iCal + Addressbook - Thunderbird

    Parallels - VirtualBox (also for Mac)

    WindowsXP - Wine (though not fully there, but impressive thus far! Also for Mac)



    For basics, it works quite well, and stable. You don't get all the templates and such, but a true artist would create their own.



    Fair enough - sounds very reasonable (at least to me). However, as a Linux user, you're also part of a small minority, and I am not sure that you're Apple's target segment.



    Makes me wonder what you're doing in this forum, though.
  • Reply 46 of 93
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JupiterOne View Post


    Two new ads. Both kind of lame....!



    At least they're responding to the new Microsoft ads, but didn't those start months ago? Are they even still running? (I don't watch TV, so the only time I see the Apple or MS ads is when AppleInsider posts them!)
  • Reply 47 of 93
    wigginwiggin Posts: 2,265member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


    Seriously the writing is on the wall here



    Sure, but that wall is far, far away yet. Stamping out optical discs mechanically will have a significant manufacturing advantage over putting movies on SD cards for quite some time to come.
  • Reply 48 of 93
    nikon133nikon133 Posts: 2,600member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mjtomlin View Post


    The new ads did nothing for me. The same can be said for Blu-Ray: Zero desire to move to Blu-Ray content. I'm still happy with standard wide-screen definition. Don't even have high-definition cable yet. I'm also just as happy buying content/movies from my AppleTV.



    I figure making the leap twice was enough. (Although I did dabble in LaserDiscs)



    Audio Cassette -> CD -> digital file

    VHS Cassette -> DVD -> digital file



    I'm done.



    I'd like to have BR for long term backup (archiving).



    I am making around 4-6GB of raw images per trip. They are all stored on big HDD, but I am also archiving them on DVDs in case of HDD failure.



    Being able to copy 5 DVDs to 1 BD (or 10 to one dual layer BD) would reduce space for storing significantly... heck, all my photos, home videos, DivX, music could be archived in one not-so-big box of BD disks.



    But last time I have checked, single layer BD was nz$25. For that money you can get 50 DVDs. Now that is just too much... but once media goes down to reasonable price per GB, I'm expecting BR to take off quickly.
  • Reply 49 of 93
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post


    Sure, but that wall is far, far away yet. Stamping out optical discs mechanically will have a significant manufacturing advantage over putting movies on SD cards for quite some time to come.



    True, but I actually think the thing that will kill optical discs will just be internet delivery. CD's are going that way, DVD's will go the same.
  • Reply 50 of 93
    wigginwiggin Posts: 2,265member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by auxlepli View Post


    Jobs is right about Blu-Ray. With the up-converter on a DVD the quality is just as good and without the DRM.

    As for the ads, if you're tired of them stop watching them.



    Agreed.



    "HDTV owners we surveyed were only slightly more satisfied with the picture quality of high-definition Blu-ray discs than they were with that of DVDs"

    - Consumer Reports, March 2009, p. 33



    I would argue that Consumer Reports survey is much more representative of the general population that those of us on these boards who are a bit more, shall we say, "geeky." And I still think that 720p is going to be in that sweet spot of "good enough" for that vast majority of people. People will still buy Blu-ray players, but often only because they need to replace a DVD player that's died. And Blu-ray will eventually become the standard, but I don't think it will ever reach the market share DVD had.



    Apple should put a DVD player in the AppleTV and sell it at $150 (which would probably be break even or a slight loss) and use it as a Trojan horse into the living room. Then market the hell out of it. They'll also need to work to get more movie content into the iTunes store. I'd bet a lot of folks would find the iTunes 720p good enough and not bother with Blu-ray.
  • Reply 51 of 93
    al_bundyal_bundy Posts: 1,525member
    blu-ray doesn't have to beat DVD since i can play DVD discs in a blu-ray player. in a few years a new format is going to come out with another 2x jump in capacity and little by little DVD will be replaced. most important thing is that any future optical format will most likely play DVDs or play at least one generation back.



    SSD's and flash memory will always be more expensive than optical and will never become the primary storage medium for large medium files. there are people with blu-ray collections of dozens of movies. the price to buy enough flash to keep them all is too much compared to optical



    my DVD is dying so i'm torn between a PS3 for Blu-Ray capablity or an x-box 360 for the netflix capability. new PS3 slim is coming next week along with an x-box 360 price cut
  • Reply 52 of 93
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    Fair enough - sounds very reasonable (at least to me). However, as a Linux user, you're also part of a small minority, and I am not sure that you're Apple's target segment.



    Makes me wonder what you're doing in this forum, though.



    I like to see what people think Apple is going to do. Apple has this built-in, free advertising source called their fans. I sometimes like to guess right along with them, and at times, say my disdain for what I think will happen in a forum that Apple doesn't read.



    I also like to be the voice of a "non-Apple" to keep things in somewhat of perspective. Kinda like the lone Browncoat amongst the Alliance. (Firefly)



    And yes, as a Linux user, I am in the minority.
  • Reply 53 of 93
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post




    Apple should put a DVD player in the AppleTV and sell it at $150 (which would probably be break even or a slight loss) and use it as a Trojan horse into the living room.



    Couldn't agree more! And, allow us to stream anything that shows up on iTunes/iPhoto (since, after all, if there were copyright issues, they are there with iLife, i.e., Apple software on your computer already). And, given the price of Mini which would be its closest competitor, charge $249 so as to make a decent profit.



    While they're at it, make iLife available for Windows for $99 a pop, for a massive new revenue opportunity.
  • Reply 54 of 93
    wigginwiggin Posts: 2,265member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post


    SSD's and flash memory will always be more expensive than optical and will never become the primary storage medium for large medium files. there are people with blu-ray collections of dozens of movies. the price to buy enough flash to keep them all is too much compared to optical



    Not to mention that SD-based movie's biggest benefit is small size and portability. But most people watch movies sitting in their living rooms. The benefit there of SD over optical disc is pretty minor. Not enough to replace your equipment as you'd need both an SD player AND an optical disc player for all the stuff you already own.



    I can see SD becoming the standard for software delivery, but if it delivers movies it will always be a niche product as online delivery will have taken over by then.
  • Reply 55 of 93
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by camroidv27 View Post




    And yes, as a Linux user, I am in the minority.



    Why, then, do the Mac v. PC ads bother you so much (see your first post in this thread) - after all, you use neither? (None of the Mac/PC ads have anything to do with Linux).
  • Reply 56 of 93
    jfanningjfanning Posts: 3,398member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by auxlepli View Post


    Jobs is right about Blu-Ray. With the up-converter on a DVD the quality is just as good and without the DRM.

    As for the ads, if you're tired of them stop watching them.



    What do you mean? DVDs contain DRM
  • Reply 57 of 93
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    Why, then, do the Mac v. PC ads bother you so much (see your first post in this thread) - after all, you use neither? (None of the Mac/PC ads have anything to do with Linux).



    Because as I said in my original post, its how the ad demeans windows users. Even though I don't like windows, I still don't like how the windows users are portrayed in these ads. By saying windows is lackluster (regardless if it is or not) you are in turn saying that the windows users are also lackluster. I know many windows users who are incredibly creative and extremely artistic and the windows os is a portal to their tools. I wouldn't call them lack luster though, and wouldn't associate them with Hodge's character in the slightest. At least, that is how I perceive the ads. Others will most likely differ.



    I do use windows. I do use Linux. I do use Mac OS X. Each has their positives and negatives and I use each where I feel it is fit. And I understand this is just how business works. I just don't like it.



    And to be honest, no OS has yet fully impressed me thus far. Someday, but not today.
  • Reply 58 of 93
    davidwdavidw Posts: 1,408member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by camroidv27 View Post


    Because as I said in my original post, its how the ad demeans windows users. Even though I don't like windows, I still don't like how the windows users are portrayed in these ads. By saying windows is lackluster (regardless if it is or not) you are in turn saying that the windows users are also lackluster. I know many windows users who are incredibly creative and extremely artistic and the windows os is a portal to their tools. I wouldn't call them lack luster though, and wouldn't associate them with Hodge's character in the slightest. At least, that is how I perceive the ads. Others will most likely differ.



    I do use windows. I do use Linux. I do use Mac OS X. Each has their positives and negatives and I use each where I feel it is fit. And I understand this is just how business works. I just don't like it.



    And to be honest, no OS has yet fully impressed me thus far. Someday, but not today.





    The Apple ads don't "demean" Windows users. They demean the Windows OS. No where in their ads do they even mention the users. It's "I'm a PC" and "I'm a Mac". Not "I'm Windows user" and "I'm an OSX user". The two main characters represents the computers itselves, not the people using the computers.



    It's the Microsoft ads that demeans Window users.
  • Reply 59 of 93
    djrumpydjrumpy Posts: 1,116member
    I work in an IT shop. You're fooling yourself if you think you can only be infected from going to 'unsafe' sites and never opening questionable e-mail attachments.



    New vectors can click-jack your browser, even on 'safe' sites. E-mail messages can infect you without even opening an attachment. Exposed port vulnerabilities can infect you without you even doing anything at all. It's actually a little frightening to see how easy it can be to become infected on a PC. Every second Tuesday of the month we get our nice list of the latest vulnerabilities from MS that must be patched to keep our work environment safe. That is in addition to the critical vulnerabilities that simply can't wait for the monthly security patches.



    I agree that a properly protected windows system can be expected to give a somewhat trouble free experience, but I wouldn't call it comparable to a Mac. It simply takes more work on a PC to keep it free of malware. I run no virus scan or malware scanners on a Mac. It's just not necessary for the handful of primitive viruses (I use that word generously) in the wild. If you do buy a scanner for a Mac, it will sit there and scan for Windows viruses. I don't have to worry about the scanner quarantining system files. I don't have to worry about system lag from a virus scanner. I don't have to worry about keeping DAT's current.



    About the only thing you'll find for a Mac are a handfu of rather crappy trojans which can't self replicate without user intervention. They require the user to type in their administrator password after manually launching them, and even then it still can't infect another system without the target granting it admin rights as well. A very different experience from a malware infection on a PC. Infections can happen without any user intervention on a PC.



    I visit my father yearly just to clean up malware. This is all of the stuff that gets by his virus scanner and spyware/malware scans. I can't fault him. He simply has bad browsing habits and doesn't understand the risk. Even so, his experience is typical of a non-skilled PC user. If I let it go too far, I always end up wiping his system starting from scratch. I can expect maybe 2-3 years on an install at best. I actually switched one of his PC's to Ubuntu this past year to see if it helps. So far so good on the malware front under Linux.



    To say the two are the same from a security standpoint is disingenuous at best.



    As to general use, I'd say they both get the job done. I still use both for work and at home for various tasks. I still prefer the Mac just for it's simplicity of use and design. The PC usually always works as well, it just takes more patience to get there.
  • Reply 60 of 93
    areseearesee Posts: 776member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post


    Not to mention that SD-based movie's biggest benefit is small size and portability. But most people watch movies sitting in their living rooms. The benefit there of SD over optical disc is pretty minor. Not enough to replace your equipment as you'd need both an SD player AND an optical disc player for all the stuff you already own.



    I can see SD becoming the standard for software delivery, but if it delivers movies it will always be a niche product as online delivery will have taken over by then.



    Are SD cards too small for retail? While reading the posts on SD cards my mind was flashing on the number of movies that were "walking" out of the store. SD cards may be to easily hid to make them practical in a retail environment.
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